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House impeachment boss is suing Trump and his supporters over the riot.

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House impeachment boss is suing Trump and his supporters over the riot.

 

Rep. Eric Swalwell, who was a House manager during Donald Trump’s last impeachment trial, filed a complaint on Friday against the former president, his son, his lawyer, and a Republican congressman, alleging that their activities contributed to the insurgency in January.

The lawsuit, brought in federal court in Washington by a California Democrat, charges a plot to violate civil rights, as well as negligence, inciting a riot, and inducing emotional distress. It comes after Rep. Bennie Thompson filed a similar suit last month in an effort to keep the former president responsible in some way for his conduct after his Senate acquittal on Jan. 6.

Swalwell claims that Trump, his son Donald Jr., former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama made “false and incendiary accusations of fraud and theft,” and that “a violent mob stormed the United States Capitol in direct reaction to the Defendant’s express calls for violence at the rally.”

The complaint details how the Trumps, Giuliani, and Brooks spread false election fraud claims both before and after the 2020 presidential election was announced, as well as allegations that they helped to incite thousands of rioters to storm the Capitol. On Jan. 6, five people were killed in the violence, including a US Capitol Police officer.

Jason Miller, a spokesperson for Trump, branded Swalwell a “low-life” with “no legitimacy.”

Swalwell is threatening “our greatest President” with yet another witch hunt, Miller said in a tweet, after struggling miserably with two impeachment hoaxes. “It’s a shame that a tainted member of Congress like Swalwell continues to serve on the House Intelligence Committee.”

The lawsuit, according to Brooks, is frivolous and a “meritless ploy.”

He said he wore the lawsuit “like a badge of bravery” and made no apology for fighting for accurate and honest elections.

The lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting the riot, using many of the same playbook used by Swalwell and others during Trump’s impeachment trial — that his lies about election results led supporters to believe the 2020 election had been rigged, that he egged on the angry mob with his rally speech, and that he did nothing when confronted with the situation.

“According to those with experience, Trump was ‘delighted’ and ‘confused as to why other people on his team weren’t as excited as he was’ at this moment of national horror.’ According to the lawsuit, “others characterized Trump as ‘borderline enthusiastic’ about the unfolding violence.”

Unlike Thompson’s case, which was brought against Trump, Giuliani, and other far-right militant organizations whose members are accused of participating in the insurgency, Swalwell’s did not clarify whether he was suing in his personal or official capacity, which would necessitate additional House approvals and involve House attorneys.

Both cases invoke a federal civil rights law passed in response to the Ku Klux Klan’s harassment of government officials. Swalwell’s lawyer, Philip Andonian, praised Thompson’s case, which was brought under the Ku Klux Klan Act during Reconstruction, and said they were 100% behind it, but saw the need for this one as well.

He explained, “We see ourselves as having a different perspective on this, keeping Trump responsible for the incitement, the misinformation.”

Presidents have long enjoyed strong legal protection for acts taken in their capacity as commander in chief. The case, like Thompson’s, was filed in Trump’s personal capacity, not in his official capacity.

Swalwell also mentions being locked in the House chamber with a large number of other members of Congress as plainclothes Capitol Police officers barricaded the doors and attempted to fend off the crowd at gunpoint.

“Fearful for their lives, the Plaintiff and others disguised themselves as members of Congress, contacted loved ones in case the worst happened, and sought refuge in the Capitol complex,” according to the complaint.

Brooks “conspired with the other Defendants to discredit the election results by charging, without proof, that the election was rigged and by manipulating elected officials, judges, and eventually Congress to reject the results,” according to the lawsuit. It reports that he spoke at a pro-Trump rally outside the White House at the Ellipse, shortly before thousands of pro-Trump rioters descended on the Capitol, overwhelming police officers and forcing their way inside.

Swalwell is seeking unspecified damages, as well as a court order that all defendants give him written notice a week before they intend to hold a rally in Washington that will attract more than 50 people.

In a tweet, Swalwell said, “Unable to consider defeat, Donald Trump waged an all-out war on a peaceful transfer of power.” “He repeatedly lied to his supporters, saying the election was stolen from them, filing a mountain of baseless lawsuits — almost all of which were dismissed — attempting to bully election officials, and eventually calling on his supporters to descend on Washington, D.C. to’stop the steal.’”

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Bo Byram is back. Nathan MacKinnon is returning. The Avalanche’s NHL-leading scoring clip is bound to surge.

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Bo Byram’s return sparks Avalanche in victory over Nashville Predators

Avalanche coach Jared Bednar said if rookie Bo Byram had shot quicker a couple of times on Saturday night, the dynamic young defenseman would have had three goals against Nashville.

Following Colorado’s 6-2 victory, Bednar also could have said if star center Nathan MacKinnon was in the lineup, the Avs could have reached seven goals for the fourth time in eight games.

Bottom line: Colorado proved in November that it is loaded offensively, and has the ability to become more dangerous when MacKinnon rejoins Byram in the lineup on Wednesday at Toronto. The Avs are 7-1 in MacKinnon’s latest absence and 5-1 without both MacKinnon and Byram this month.

They have averaged 5.4 goals in the past eight games to lead the NHL in scoring at 4.00. And their .750 winning percentage in November (7-2-1) is a club record.

What happens when MacKinnon follows Byram in rejoining the lineup in the next game on Wednesday at Toronto? Perhaps MacKinnon will realize he doesn’t have to be the superstar for this team to score more goals than it allows, and that diminished pressure will add to the team’s chemistry.

“He’s one of the best players in the world,” Mikko Rantanen, who had three goals and four points against the Preds, said of MacKinnon. “Getting one of the best players back to the team is only going to help us.”

Byram is certainly an important side piece, and he adds to what already is the NHL’s most multi-faceted blue-line corps.

Byram, who settled for the game-winning goal and four shots in logging 22:00 after missing six games with another concussion, was the second coming of Cale Makar against the Preds. That’s a big statement as Makar, the 2021 Norris Trophy finalist who is on an offensive tear, had seven goals and 12 points in his career-high six-game points streak.

Bednar had high praise for Byram for how quickly the 20-year-old returned to his dominant nature while coming off at least his third concussion of 2021.

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WATCH: Broncos’ Javonte Williams’ 9-yard touchdown run against Chargers

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WATCH: Broncos’ Javonte Williams’ 9-yard touchdown run against Chargers

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Dolphins crush Panthers behind Tua-Waddle connection, win fourth straight

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Dolphins crush Panthers behind Tua-Waddle connection, win fourth straight

The Miami Dolphins showed their midseason momentum is real and displayed what can become of the young Alabama connection of quarterback Tua Tagovailoa and receiver Jaylen Waddle.

In a key game to determine if the Dolphins could legitimately swing their sudden surge into a reinsertion in the AFC playoff conversation, they responded. Clicking on all cylinders in a 33-10 victory over the Carolina Panthers on Sunday at Hard Rock Stadium, Miami won its fourth consecutive game.

The Dolphins, after starting 1-7, now find themselves at 5-7 with home games against the lowly New York Giants (4-7) and Jets (3-8) on the horizon and a path to getting back to .500 looking more and more realistic, especially after demoralizing the Panthers (5-7).

Tagovailoa completed just under 90 percent of his passes, going 27 of 31 for 230 yards and a touchdown. More than half of that passing yardage went to Waddle, the rookie wideout who finished with nine receptions for 137 yards and the touchdown. It all came against a Carolina pass defense that entered Sunday ranked No. 1 in the NFL.

The Dolphins defense held the Panthers to pedestrian numbers. Starting quarterback Cam Newton was 5 of 21 for 92 yards, two interceptions and a rushing touchdown. Star running back Christian McCaffrey was held to 35 rushing yards on 10 carries.

Miami finished outgaining the Carolina, 315-198. The Dolphins held the Panthers to 4 of 12 on third downs, forced three turnovers on defense and even scored on special teams.

A pair of second-quarter touchdowns gave the Dolphins a 21-7 lead. First, Waddle caught a 9-yard touchdown from Tagovailoa that followed an interception and return into the red zone by cornerback Xavien Howard.

Later in the half, Waddle’s 57-yard catch and run over the middle from Tagovailoa eventually set up running back Myles Gaskin to score on a direct snap for a 3-yard touchdown. It was one of two Gaskin rushing scores out of the Wildcat, adding on from 3 yards out again in the third quarter.

Before halftime, The Dolphins were in position to add to the two-touchdown lead, but it backfired when center Austin Reiter skipped a shotgun snap past Tagovailoa that Panthers linebacker Frankie Luvu recovered and ran the other way to the Miami 23-yard line. Receiver Isaiah Ford made a touchdown-saving tackle, but it left a second on the clock for a Zane Gonzalez 41-yard field goal. Miami led, 21-10, at halftime.

The Dolphins struck first on special teams when linebacker Duke Riley blocked a first-quarter punt deep in Panthers’ territory that cornerback Justin Coleman recovered for a touchdown. Riley also had a big third-down hit on Panthers receiver DJ Moore that forced the punt.

Carolina answered with a Newton 1-yard rushing touchdown that was set up by a long pass for 64 yards from Newton to Moore, who got open over the top on what appeared to be a miscommunication between Howard and fellow cornerback Byron Jones, both on the same side with no safety help.

Miami’s secondary recovered from there, intercepting Newton twice in the first half. Rookie safety Jevon Holland had the first one while Howard had the later one that set up the Waddle touchdown.

The Dolphins got to the Panthers’ 24-yard line on their opening possession, but former American Heritage High and FSU standout Brian Burns swooped past right tackle Jesse Davis for a strip-sack of Tagovailoa. Davis recovered the fumble, which was followed by a Michael Palardy punt to the Carolina 5-yard line before the Miami special teams score.

Aside from the Howard and Holland interceptions, cornerback Nik Needham had a diving interception late against Panthers backup quarterback PJ Walker. Jaelan Phillips had three sacks, and Emmanuel Ogbah and Christian Wilkins added one apiece.

Dolphins kicker Jason Sanders made a pair of fourth-quarter field goals, but he also missed an extra point off the upright.

Sunday’s game was only the seventh meeting all time between the Dolphins and Panthers. Carolina, a 1996 expansion franchise in the NFC, is Miami’s least-faced opponent in the NFL.

The Dolphins host the Giants next Sunday before their bye week.

This story will be updated.

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