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Biden’s remark about Putin was deemed “very evil” by the Kremlin.

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Biden's remark about Putin was deemed "very evil" by the Kremlin.
Biden's remark about Putin was deemed "very evil" by the Kremlin.

Biden’s remark about Putin was deemed “very evil” by the Kremlin.

 

The Kremlin slammed US President Joe Biden’s remarks regarding Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday, threatening to reconsider its approach to relations with the US.

Russia announced on Wednesday that it would recall its ambassador to Washington for consultations after Vice President Joe Biden was asked in an interview whether he believes Russian President Vladimir Putin is a serial killer and replied, “I do.”

Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s spokesman, called Trump’s comment a “very poor statement” that made it clear that “he doesn’t want to normalize relations.”

“We will proceed accordingly,” Peskov said in a press conference call, adding that “nothing like that has ever happened before.” He refused to say if Russia could go so far as to break diplomatic relations with the US.

Biden’s “boorish speech,” according to Konstantin Kosachev, a deputy speaker of the Russian parliament’s upper house, marks a turning point.

Kosachev said, “These judgments are inadmissible for a statesman of his rank.” “Under no conditions are such statements permissible. They always result in a sharp escalation of our bilateral ties.”

“If the American side fails to give clarification and excuse,” Kosachev warned, Russia’s response will not be limited to recalling the Russian ambassador. He wouldn’t say what other steps the Kremlin would take.

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova blamed the US for taking bilateral relations to a “dead end,” adding that “we are interested in avoiding their irreversible degradation, if the Americans are aware of the related risks,” while announcing the decision to recall the Russian ambassador in Washington.

“We will be clear, we will speak out on places where we have concerns, and it will definitely be, as the president said last night — certainly, the Russians will be kept responsible for the acts that they have taken,” White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki said in response to the Russian move on Wednesday.

The tough comments come after a declassified report from the US National Intelligence Director’s Office found that President Vladimir Putin allowed influence operations to help Donald Trump win the presidential election last November.

When asked about the declassified article, Biden said, “(Putin) will pay a price.”

After Moscow’s 2014 invasion of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula, election meddling, hacking attacks, and, most recently, the jailing of Russia’s opposition leader Alexei Navalny, whom he blamed on the Kremlin, Russia’s relations with the United States and the European Union have already sunk to post-Cold War lows. The allegations were dismissed by Russian authorities.

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Mike Glennon, not Daniel Jones, could be Giants’ starting QB when they face Dolphins

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Mike Glennon, not Daniel Jones, could be Giants’ starting QB when they face Dolphins

A person familiar with the situation has told The Associated Press that New York Giants quarterback Daniel Jones has a neck injury and his status for Sunday’s game against the Miami Dolphins is uncertain.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity Tuesday because the Giants have not released their injury report and the team had the day off. The person said Jones’ name will be on the report on Wednesday.

NFL Network was first to report the injury.

Coach Joe Judge is scheduled to talk to reporters on Wednesday morning.

Jones has started every game this season for the Giants (4-7). He was 19 of 30 for 202 yards and a touchdown against the Eagles in a 13-7 win on Sunday.

Jones played every offensive snap against Philadelphia and did not appear to be injured on any play. He spoke with reporters after the game and showed no sign of injury.

Jones, the No. 6 pick overall in 2019, is having his best season. He is 232 of 361 for 2,428 yards and 10 touchdowns. He is hitting 64.3% of his passes and has seven interceptions. He also is second on the team in rushing with 298 yards on 62 carries.

The running has led to Jones taking a few big hits because he does not slide much. He suffered a concussion against Dallas on Oct. 10 trying to score on a bootleg on third down from the Dallas 1.

If he were unable to play, veteran Mike Glennon would start. He replaced Jones against Dallas and completed 16 of 25 passes for 196 yards and a touchdown.

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Colorado prep football: Future of 4A/5A state title games at Mile High unclear after 2022

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Colorado prep football: Future of 4A/5A state title games at Mile High unclear after 2022

The ultimate dream for big-school high school football teams in Colorado is to finish their season on the state’s grandest stage: Empower Field at Mile High.

“To have a chance to play here is a big, big deal for kids,” Cherry Creek head coach Dave Logan said.

But the future site of 4A and 5A football championship games is uncertain.

CHSAA has partnered with the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame, a nonprofit responsible for putting on the games since 2005, to crown football champions inside the home of the Denver Broncos. Their current agreement expires following the 2022 season. The CSHOF has offered CHSAA a new contract to keep state title games at Mile High through 2024, but a new deal has not been reached.

“We want to do it and the Broncos want to keep doing it,” CSHOF president and CEO Tom Lawrence said. “But we have received no response.”

CHSAA assistant commissioner Adam Bright confirmed there have been no “real serious conversations yet” regarding future plans for hosting big-school football championship games beyond 2022. CHSAA is weighing all of its venue options moving forward.

“It’s something where we need to sit down and address a contract that has been in place for (many) years. It’s probably time to make some adjustments to it,” Bright said. “The beauty of it is that it’s not something we have to rush into. We don’t have to make a decision today. We know where we’re going to be next year and we have a great partnership. It’s something we can take some time to really look at and decide what’s best for the sport of football as a whole in the state of Colorado at the high school level.”

On Tuesday, select players and head coaches from the four big-school state finalists — No. 5 Erie vs. No. 7 Chatfield (4A) and No. 1 Valor Christian vs. No. 2 Cherry Creek (5A) — spoke with reporters to preview their respective title games Saturday. They were nearly unanimous in support of playing at Empower Field.

“I definitely think it should be played at Mile High. It’s such a great opportunity to be able to play here. It’s a dream for some kids,” Valor Christian senior running back Gavin Sawchuk said. “I thank the Broncos and CHSAA for being able to put it on this year. I’d love to have it here in (future) years.”

Chatfield senior kicker/punter Andre Haddad said: “If it were not to be held at Mile High anymore, I think that would be a letdown for a lot of future generations of players. Because this is something that we look forward to and something you work for. It’s a landmark for us.”

One reason CHSAA might seek an Empower Field alternative? The opportunity to feature state championship games for all seven classifications at the same location.

Bright said the idea is to “celebrate all levels of football.” But the natural grass field at Mile High is ill-equipped to handle seven title games while maintaining an NFL-ready playing surface.

“I was in Limon last night being with our six-man coaches and talking with them about next season and the idea that you can create a culminating event — like our state wrestling tournament — and how awesome it is to have all classifications together,” Bright said. “Those are things we want to explore and see. Rather than reinvent the wheel, I want to talk to other state associations that have pulled it off.”

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Colorado hunts for omicron variant as health officials caution that much is still unknown about new COVID strain

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Colorado hunts for omicron variant as health officials caution that much is still unknown about new COVID strain

Colorado public health officials are expanding their search for the new omicron variant of the coronavirus — including by monitoring communities’ wastewater — and said Tuesday that it’s just a matter of time before the new strain is detected in the state.

Omicron, which has not yet been confirmed in the U.S., was identified last week as having been discovered in South Africa. But officials said Tuesday it had been detected in the Netherlands at least a week before the World Health Organization labeled it a “variant of concern.”

Emily Travanty, director of Colorado’s state lab, said during a news briefing Tuesday that the state is reviewing a portion of all positive COVID-19 tests to look for the variant.

“We continue to ensure that we are getting (test) samples in from all across the state and make sure we are seeing a subsampling of everything that is happening in the environment,” she said, adding, “I’m confident that… we are able to see omicron when it does appear in Colorado.”

Public health officials are concerned that mutations found in the omicron variant could make it more transmissible or that immune response may not be as effective, which could raise the possibility of reinfections, said Dr. Rachel Herlihy, the state epidemiologist, during the briefing.

However, she stressed that there is still much that remains unknown about the variant, including the severity of illness that it may cause.

“The reality is we do have a lot to learn still,” Herlihy said.

Colorado’s health department is searching for the omicron variant using diagnostic testing and clinical sequencing. About 16% of all positive PCR tests are genetically sequenced by the state in an effort to identify which variant of COVID-19 has infected the person, according to the agency.

But public health officials believe the state’s wastewater surveillance program, which began in August 2020, will discover the presence of the new variant more quickly than other methods. The health department updated the program this weekend so that it can now detect genetic markers of omicron in wastewater.

Almost 50% of people with COVID-19 shed the virus in their stool even if they don’t have symptoms. So the state is partnering with 21 utilities to identify the virus and detect specific variants within broader communities via their wastewater, said Rachel Jervis, an epidemiologist with the health department. But wastewater monitoring cannot identify COVID-19 infections in individual people.

That wastewater surveillance is how the agency first confirmed the delta variant’s presence in Colorado, she said. The first delta infections were discovered in Mesa County in May.

Before that, however, Colorado was the first state to identify a COVID-19 variant in the U.S. when it detected what later became known as the alpha variant in Elbert County last December. That case was confirmed by the state lab and was notable because public health experts said the U.S. lacked the infrastructure needed to quickly find genetic variations of the coronavirus.

The more contagious delta variant is driving the state’s most recent surge in COVID-19 cases, with it making up most cases since July, Travanty said.

The state is in the middle of one of its worst waves of the pandemic, and while public health officials said the decline in new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in recent days is a sign that the situation is improving, they cautioned that the Thanksgiving holiday could be skewing the numbers as fewer people get tested and data can lag around the holidays.

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