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Georgia Democrats are introducing new laws in response to the spa killings.

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Georgia Democrats are introducing new laws in response to the spa killings.
Georgia Democrats are introducing new laws in response to the spa killings.

Georgia Democrats are introducing new laws in response to the spa killings.

 

In reaction to the recent shootings at massage parlors in metro Atlanta that left eight people dead, including six women of Asian descent, Democratic lawmakers in Georgia have introduced a slew of bills, but it’s doubtful they’ll see action anytime soon.

The plans would impose a five-day waiting period for gun sales, establish a statewide 911 call translation system, and improve law enforcement training with an emphasis on outreach in other languages. Democrats say they’re reacting to reports that people who didn’t speak fluent English had difficulty communicating with responding officers, as well as reports that the gunman purchased a gun the morning of the shootings.

The bills are unlikely to pass this year because they are too late for procedural deadlines and there are just a few days left in the legislative session, which ends on March 31. Furthermore, any legislation restricting gun purchases is likely to be met with fierce resistance in the Republican-controlled legislature.

“We’re certainly looking forward to next session, only because of the way the process is going,” Democratic state Rep. Marvin Lim, who is one of the Asian American legislators supporting the bills, said. “However, that isn’t the point. He said that “we needed to act now and send a message” to the mourning communities, as well as begin a dialogue with law enforcement agencies about accessibility.

“The three bills seek to address different device failures,” Lim said.

Robert Aaron Long, a 21-year-old white man, is accused of murdering eight people at three different massage parlors in the Atlanta area. Another individual was wounded, but he or she was unharmed.

Rep. Sam Park, a Democrat, is the prime sponsor of a bill that would impose a five-day waiting period for gun purchases.

“This is a common-sense initiative to minimize gun abuse, based on impulsivity, based on rage,” Park said. “I think we’re all astounded that this man, the gunman, was able to get a gun and kill eight people in less than 24 hours.”

Park agreed that the bill would be impossible to pass in Georgia, where Republicans hold the governorship and the General Assembly. However, he predicted that gun control would be a major concern in the 2022 gubernatorial election, as all of those positions will be on the ballot.

“It’s important to show the people that we’re fighting for them, that we’re fighting to protect our community so that these kinds of tragic events don’t happen again,” Park said.

Tyler Harper, a Republican state senator who has introduced gun-rights bills in the past, says he opposes a five-day waiting period.

Harper said, “I believe it is an undue burden on law-abiding citizens’ ability to access and exercise their constitutional rights.”

In the aftermath of the killings, Democrats introduced two more bills aimed at improving communication between minority communities and law enforcement. One plan calls for the Georgia Emergency Response Authority to set up a statewide 911 call translation system. The other will require the Georgia agency in charge of law enforcement training to provide community response and strategic outreach training in languages other than English.

Sen. Sheikh Rahman, a Democrat from Bangladesh, was the first person of Asian origin to be elected to the Georgia state Senate.

“I have people from over a hundred different countries that speak over a hundred different languages. In our culture, reporting is a major issue,” said Rahman, whose first language is Bengali.

Although 911 center leaders admit that translation is a problem, they claim that many 911 centers have already solved it by using on-call translation services.

The secretary of the Georgia Emergency Response Authority, which aims to strengthen emergency communications in Georgia, is William Wright, the manager of Barrow County E-911. He said that although each emergency dispatch center is managed on a local level and can vary, the use of translation services is popular nationwide.

“The dispatcher will call a number and an interpreter will come on the line,” Wright explained.

He claims that this is a more realistic choice than attempting to employ multilingual operators. “Our city and our country are so diverse now that staffing a 911 center with someone who can speak every language is extremely difficult,” Wright said.

Rahman said that he wanted law enforcement officers to receive “basic instruction” as well as easy access to interpreters. “Just to get the conversation started,” he said, officers could carry a simple reference card with some basic phrases in popular foreign languages.

“You don’t have to be a linguist,” Rahman said.

Mario Gonzalez, the husband of shooting victim Delaina Ashley Yaun, was detained, according to Park, and his arrest is just one example of why police need to be better at dealing with minorities. Gonzalez, who survived the assault, claims he was kept in handcuffs for four hours after the incident.

An email sent to the Georgia Public Safety Training Center, which trains several police officers throughout the state, was not immediately returned.

On Tuesday, the Democrats who are sponsoring the bills released a joint statement calling for action.

The statement said, “We look to our past and where this country has been, and we look forward to the change we need to see.”

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An Italian Masterpiece from the 17th Century Found in a Random New York Church

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An Italian Masterpiece from the 17th Century Found in a Random New York Church
The 17th century masterpiece had been hanging in the church since the 1960s. WABC

In a stroke of good fortune, an Italian Baroque painting by the artist Cesare Dandini was discovered in New Rochelle, New York early last year by an unsuspecting Iona College art history professor. The academic, Tom Ruggio, recently recounted his story, saying that as soon as he laid eyes on the canvas, he was certain that “a quest had begun.” While visiting the Church of the Holy Family, a place of worship located close to Iona College, Ruggio was stunned to lay eyes on a painting that was very much like similar ones in churches he’d seen when visiting Italy. Upon closer investigation, Ruggio became certain that the painting was authentic.

“I realized immediately it was an Italian Baroque painting,” Ruggio told ABC7. “And I sort of did a double take, why is it here? I immediately got up and started to take some bad pictures with my cellphone.” Using his art history connections, Ruggio sent the images to colleagues in Italy and Manhattan, who determined that the canvas was one in a series of paintings completed by Dandini in the 1630s. The painting, entitled Holy Family with the Infant St. John, features beautifully rendered Biblical figures.

The “central figures are the Virgin Mary and the Christ child,” Ruggio explained. “We’ve got Joseph and we have the infant St. John. Saint John the Baptist.” For years, experts and art enthusiasts believed that the painting had been missing, but it was in the Church of the Holy Family for more than six decades. For the next three months, the painting will be on display at Iona College.

How did the painting get to the church? “The former pastor Monsignor Fitzgerald went over to I believe London and was going through different galleries because he wanted to get paintings for over the door here and on the other side of the church,” Dennis Keane, a Monsignor with the Church of the Holy Family, explained. “He purchased two of these paintings in a gallery, but we don’t know the name of the gallery.”

An Italian Masterpiece from the 17th Century Found in a Random New York Church

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Trailblazing Chinese American WWII hero and Philly police commander dies at 93

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Philadelphia PD Anthony Wong

Anthony Wong, a trailblazing retired Philadelphia Police Department commander, died last week at 93 years old.

The details: Wong, a World War II and Korean War hero who was the son of Chinese immigrants, passed peacefully surrounded by family on Sept. 8, according to his obituary on Stretch Funeral Home.

  • He was the highest-ranking Chinese American in the history of the Philadelphia Police Department,” Jim Trainor, Wong’s son-in-law who is also a member of the department, told CBS Philadelphia. “I would say he broke all barriers when it came to Asians coming into the police department.”
  • Wong joined the Philadelphia PD in 1953 after serving in the United States Army in two wars. He was the only Chinese American officer in the department at the time.
  • He mentored thousands of cadets in the department and attained the rank of Chief Inspector before his retirement 18 years ago.
  • What a terrific father figure for me, friend, mentor,” Trainor said. “My 33rd year in the police department, he’s guided me the whole way. He’s been with me the whole way.”

His services: Wong had served in various areas of policing, including Narcotics and Vice Enforcement. He was a two-time commanding officer of the Training Bureau and also commanded the Patrol Bureau, Emergency Planning and Community Relations Division during his service. 

  • He endured so much to be able to kick the door open for so many and keep it open,” Police Commissioner Danielle Outlaw said in a statement. “What an amazing accomplishment and we thank him for his service.”
  • Wong joined the police department to serve as a bridge between the authorities and the Asian community in order to help Asians gain access to government and agency services.
  • “[Being a police officer] provides the opportunity to prevent suffering,” Wong said in his speech at the Students for Asian Affairs in 1993, Daily Pennsylvania reported. “I also wanted to [reach out] to the Asian community. They don’t always have the access they need to government agencies and services.”
  • Wong had also served on the board of directors of the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation (PCDC), which he was also a co-founder of, and On Lok House, a senior citizen center in Philadelphia.

Featured Image via Stretch Funeral Home

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Lowry: Why Democrats won’t be able to pay for ambitions

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Lowry: Why Democrats won’t be able to pay for ambitions

Benjamin Franklin was right about death and taxes, but new taxes only become inevitable when a Democrat is elected president.

The House Ways and Means Committee released an outline of tax proposals to offset President Biden’s jaw-dropping spending plans, and it’s the expected assortment of tax increases on business and the affluent that Democrats like to pretend can fund a social welfare state of the sort that Bernie Sanders has long pined and advocated for.

The individual tax rate would increase from 37% to 39.6%, the capital gains rate from 20% to 25%, and the corporate tax rate from 21% to 26.5 %, among sundry other provisions befitting the hideously complex U.S. tax regime.

It’s a sign of the scope of Biden plans that the committee version represents a step back from his tax proposals, yet still clocks in at an enormous $2.2 trillion in estimated new revenue over ten years.

The corporate taxes are particularly noxious. Democrats love the politics of taxing corporations, based on the lazy and wrongheaded idea that the corporate tax is the way to stick it to executives and shareholders. To the contrary, if businesses are taxed at a higher rate, they have less resources available for the capital investments that improve worker productivity over time. This ultimately means lower wages for workers.

According to the Tax Foundation, a top corporate rate of 28% would once again give the U.S. the highest rate in the OECD at 32.3% once state level corporate taxes are factored in as well.

What’s the sense in instantly making the business environment in the United States less favorable and giving a competitive advantage to foreign countries?

While the Way and Means draft rejects Biden proposals such as taking the capital gains rate all the way up to 39%(!), it does everything it can to try to hold anyone making less than $400,000 harmless. As The Washington Post puts it, “The efforts are designed to avoid even the appearance of affecting middle- and lower-income households.”

This is where the Democrats are willing to talk the talk about a cradle-to-grave welfare state, but not walk the walk. There can be no European-style welfare state, at least not sustainably so, without European-style taxes.
The dirty secret about the Scandinavian countries that the left constantly holds up as a model is that they aren’t afraid to tax the middle class. These alleged models of social justice tax more than we do and tax much more broadly, realizing that taxing the rich and corporations isn’t enough to fund extensive and generous social programs.

The Tax Foundation calculates that if the U.S. had a tax system comparable to Denmark, we would be taxing all income over $70,000 at 55.9%, Denmark’s top rate.

The Ways and Means tax hikes would, sure enough, create Denmark-like rates. But the rates wouldn’t reach down into the middle class. In fact, Democrats from high tax states are determined to raise the cap on federal tax deductions for state and local taxes to reduce the tax bite on their relatively affluent constituents.

Maybe don’t increase taxes in the first place?

Indeed, rather than trying to spend historic amounts of money while their slender majorities last, it’d be better for the country if Democrats sought to fund their priorities by reallocating dollars within the already vast federal budget. But standing the aforementioned Benjamin Franklin on his head, they believe that a trillion saved is a trillion wasted.


Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.

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Rochester woman mourns child’s father killed in Wis. quadruple homicide

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Rochester woman mourns child’s father killed in Wis. quadruple homicide

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mackenzie Fjerstad was at her home in Rochester, Minnesota, surrounded by family and friends, when she found out her 2-year-old daughter Maelahni was never going to be with her father again.

Fjerstad, 22, learned Monday afternoon, Sept. 13, that her ex-boyfriend and Maelahni’s father, Matthew Pettus, was one of four people found fatally shot Sunday, Sept. 12, in an abandoned SUV in a cornfield in Dunn County, Wis.

“I just broke,” Fjerstad said. “I just broke down bawling. I’ve never felt this type of pain before. Ever.”

Pettus, 26, and the three other victims — his sister Jasmine Christine Sturm, 30, of St. Paul; Nitosha Lee Flug-Presley, 30, of Stillwater, Minnesota, and Loyace Foreman III, 35, of St. Paul — were found in the SUV by a farmer Sunday afternoon. The night before, they had been 65 miles west at a bar in St. Paul, where Pettus was living, Dunn County Sheriff Kevin Bygd said during a news conference on Tuesday, Sept. 14.

Authorities believe the four “were randomly brought to” Dunn County.

Bygd said there is no connection between the victims and Dunn County, and at this time there are no indications the motive behind the killings involved drugs or organized crime activity.

Fjerstad met Pettus in Rochester in 2017 while in line at a Taco Bell drive-thru. Pettus was working there and the two were flirting while she was waiting for her food, she said.

Matthew Pettus, 26, of St. Paul, with his daughter, Maelahni. (Courtesy of Mackenzie Fjerstad)

“I did a Facebook status like, ‘Oh, whoever the Taco Bell drive-thru guy is is pretty cute,’” she said. “And then he found me on Facebook a week later.”

That started a three-year relationship that led to the birth of their daughter in 2019. They separated in 2020 and Pettus moved to St. Paul, but that didn’t stop him from being an active part of Maelahni’s life.

“He was great. He was always supportive. He was always making sure she had more than she needed. He would take her unnecessarily shopping,” Fjerstad said. “He always wanted to do something with her … He just always made sure she had everything she needed and she loves him so much.

“It definitely made me feel lucky that I was blessed with my child’s father actually wanting to be there.”

Fjerstad also described Pettus as a “stubborn” person, but also welcoming to others. Pettus did have a criminal record in Olmsted County.

“He struggled with a lot of things, but no matter what, he tried. And he was there,” Fjerstad said.

Pettus’ sister, Jasmine Sturm, also played an involved role when it came to her niece.

“(Maelahni) loved her auntie,” Fjerstad said. “Every time she saw her, she would get excited. Jasmine did everything she could to help me, too. She would take Maelahni sometimes on weekends and just take her out.”

Even after they separated, Fjerstad said she was comfortable reaching out to Pettus and always wanted him to be a part of her and Maelahni’s lives.

“No matter what happened, I knew that I could call him and cry to him about something that didn’t even involve him or my child,” she said. “He was there … He was my first love. I’ve always cared about him and I told him ‘No matter what, I’m always going to care about you and always have a love for you. You’re the father of my child. I don’t want anything to happen to you.’”

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NASCAR Cup Series returns to Watkins Glen in late August 2022

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NASCAR Cup Series returns to Watkins Glen in late August 2022

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. (WETM) – The NASCAR Cup Series will return to Watkins Glen International and New York State on Sunday, August 21, two weeks later than the race’s typical weekend.

The race was announced as part of the 2022 NASCAR Cup Series schedule and will be the second-to-last NASCAR Cup Series regular season race of the season.

“The on-track intensity is going ramp up even more for next year’s race,” WGI President Michael Printup said. “Moving our race to later in August means the drivers will be in desperation mode to secure one of the few remaining chances at the championship. Dreams will be made, and title hopes dashed, on the twists and turns at The Glen.”

The race at Watkins Glen will lead up to the regular season finale at Daytona International Speedway to set up the Playoff field of 16 drivers.

Schedules for the NASCAR Xfinity Series, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series and ARCA Menards Series 2022 seasons will be announced in the near future. In addition, start times and television network information for Cup Series races will be also announced at a later date.

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Concert series hosted at Laclede’s Landing

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Concert series hosted at Laclede’s Landing

ST. LOUIS – Local promoter Jamo Presents is hosting a concert series in partnership with the STLmade campaign.

The concerts will take place at Laclede’s Landing on the St. Louis Riverfront from Sept. 16 to Oct. 10. The list of acts includes:

  • Sean Canan’s Voodoo Players
  • Talib Kweli + Reggie Son and NandoSTL
  • Cherub
  • The Dead South
  • Keller Williams’ Grateful Grass ft. The Hillbenders
  • Marquise Knox’s #iknowtheblues Festival
  • Aaron Kamm and the One Drops

For more information about the dates and times for the events, visit here.

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Chauvin pleads not guilty to violating teen’s civil rights

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Chauvin pleads not guilty to violating teen’s civil rights

By AMY FORLITI

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The former Minneapolis police officer convicted of murder in the death of George Floyd pleaded not guilty Thursday to violating the civil rights of a teenager in a separate case that involved a restraint similar to the one used on Floyd.

Derek Chauvin was convicted earlier this year on state charges of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s 2020 death. He was sentenced to 22 1/2 years. He’s also charged in federal court with violating Floyd’s civil rights when he knelt on the Black man’s neck for about 9 1/2 minutes as Floyd was facedown on the pavement, not resisting and pleading for air.

But another indictment against Chauvin alleges he carried out a similar act against a then-14-year-old boy in 2017. This indictment alleges Chauvin deprived the teenager, who is Black, of his right to be free of unreasonable force when he held the teen by the throat, hit him in the head with a flashlight and held his knee on the boy’s neck and upper back while he was prone, handcuffed and not resisting.

When U.S. Magistrate Judge Hildy Bowbeer asked how he would plead to the charge, Chauvin replied, “Not guilty, your honor.”

Thursday’s hearing was held via videoconference, and Chauvin appeared from the state’s maximum security prison, where he’s being held following his murder conviction. He was in a large room, and wearing a plain T-shirt as he sat at the head of a long table. No one was visible in the room with him, but a man was seen behind a window pane over Chauvin’s shoulder. He had some paper on the table in front of him and appeared to take notes.

Thursday’s hearing also addressed some pretrial motions, which were routine.

According to a police report from the 2017 encounter, Chauvin wrote that the teen resisted arrest and after the teen, whom he described as 6-foot-2 and about 240 pounds, was handcuffed, Chauvin “used body weight to pin” him to the floor. The boy was bleeding from the ear and needed two stitches.

That encounter was one of several mentioned in state court filings that prosecutors said showed Chauvin had used neck or head and upper body restraints seven times prior to Floyd’s death dating back to 2014, including four times state prosecutors said he went too far and held the restraints “beyond the point when such force was needed under the circumstances.”

Chauvin and three other former officers — Thomas Lane, J. Kueng and Tou Thao — were arraigned on civil rights violations in Floyd’s death on Tuesday. All four pleaded not guilty to those charges. The indictment in the 2017 case was filed the same day as the one for Floyd’s death.

According to the indictment in Floyd’s death, the officers allegedly deprived Floyd of his rights while acting under government authority. The federal indictment alleges Chauvin violated Floyd’s right to be free from unreasonable seizure and from unreasonable force by a police officer. Thao and Kueng are charged with violating Floyd’s right to be free from unreasonable seizure by not intervening to stop Chauvin as he knelt on Floyd’s neck. All four officers are charged with depriving Floyd of his rights when they failed to provide medical care.

Floyd repeatedly said he couldn’t breathe as Chauvin pinned him to the ground. Kueng and Lane helped restrain Floyd; Kueng knelt on Floyd’s back, and Lane held Floyd’s legs, according to evidence in state court. Thao held back bystanders and kept them from intervening.

___

Find AP’s full coverage of the death of George Floyd at: https://apnews.com/hub/death-of-george-floyd

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Barbara Kruger and Mark Bradford are Included in This Year’s ‘TIME 100’ List

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Barbara Kruger and Mark Bradford are Included in This Year’s ‘TIME 100’ List
Barbara Kruger’s “Untitled” at Art Basel Switzerland in 2018. Harold Cunningham/Getty Images

Every year, TIME magazine takes it upon itself to determine which public figures are the most influential, and in 2021, several prominent artists have made the roster. It stands to reason that this would be the case, given that 2021’s turbulence has begged for cultural interpretation, but even so, the names chosen for the list are appropriately diverse and wide-ranging in terms of the subject matter they deal with. The artists chosen for the final tally include Barbara Kruger, whose feminist art insists upon itself with blazing boldness, as well as Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara, a Cuban dissident artist who’s recently been involved in antigovernment protests.

Also included: Mark Bradford, a large-scale abstract painter whose artworks have tackled subject matter including AIDS and isolation. Bradford was one of many artists who used his talents to try to capture the mood of the coronavirus pandemic, and Anita Hill, who wrote the TIME blurb praising the painter, was careful to point this out. “While in quarantine, he created paintings that convey the isolation, violence, struggles and resilience that marked our time apart,” Hill writes. “Mark’s work gives me hope that the challenges we’ve faced will help to connect us. Though future disasters may seem inevitable, Mark’s art has shown us how we might avoid them, if only we are brave enough to see.”

Art critic and historian Hal Foster is similarly effusive on the subject of Kruger. “Last year she had copies of a 1991 version of this work pasted on the streets of Szczecin, Poland, in response to restrictive new abortion laws there,” Foster says. “Always alert to questions of audience and venue, Kruger forever seeks new ways to intervene in the public sphere, drawing political debate into artistic practice and vice versa.”

Finally, none other than Ai Weiwei was tasked with summing up Alcántara. “Although he has since been imprisoned, his life, behavior and expression as a whole are so powerful that they can resist the aesthetic and ethical degeneration of authoritarianism,” Weiwei writes. He should know, given how much trouble he continues to get himself in back in Hong Kong.

Barbara Kruger and Mark Bradford are Included in This Year’s ‘TIME 100’ List

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South Korean President Moon Jae-in to bring BTS along with him on trip to America

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President Moon accompanied by BTS

K-pop mega group BTS will accompany South Korean President Moon Jae-in as special presidential envoys at the 76th session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York next week.

Awarding ceremony: The seven-man group was awarded the certificates on Tuesday appointing them as “Special Presidential Envoys for Future Generations and Culture” in a ceremony at the Blue House, according to Korea JoongAng Daily.

  • At the ceremony, BTS member Kim Nam-joon, better known as “RM,” said it was a “great honor to be able to do something with the title of a special presidential envoy for future generations and culture.”
  • We always thought about whether we could repay all the love we have received and give back at the same time, and we are honored that the president has given us such a great opportunity and will work hard as special envoys,” the band’s leader added.
  • The theme of next week’s U.N. General Assembly meeting is: “Building resilience through hope — to recover from Covid-19, rebuild sustainability, respond to the needs of the planet, respect the rights of people, and revitalize the United Nations.”
  • BTS will reportedly accompany Moon during his U.S. trip from Sept. 19 to 23, ABC News reported. The group has accompanied the South Korean president to a U.N. General Assembly in the past, where RM delivered a speech as part of the ongoing UNICEF “Love Myself” campaign.

Their duties: Named as special envoys in July, BTS is expected to “deliver a message of comfort and hope to young people worldwide” and “facilitate diversity, environment and equality around the world.”

  • BTS’ first duties as special envoys will begin when they accompany Moon to the U.N. General Assembly next week for the second meeting of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG Moment).
  • The band’s attendance at the meeting will “serve as a meaningful opportunity to expand communication with future generations around the world and draw their sympathy on major international issues,” the Blue House said in a statement, referring to the band’s considerable reach with younger people.

Share your story: BTS announced a new project, titled “Youth Today, Your story,” following the special envoy announcement.

  • “What were the past 2 yrs like for you, and what’s your world like today?” the group asked their followers on Twitter. “Express the precious things that make up your world or show who you are now with an image, an emoji or a word.”
  • The group also has an online concert in October called “Permission to Dance on Stage.” The upcoming concert will be BTS’ first online concert for 2021, NME reported.

Featured Image via SBS

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The best looks for spring on the New York Fashion Week runway

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The best looks for spring on the New York Fashion Week runway

Last week, New York Fashion Week didn’t just come back, it came roaring back. After being sent largely online for the last few seasons, a decent portion of its presentations were finally in person (while other contingents were either streamed online, offered as high-production videos or in-person but private visits).

We thought it was worth looking back at the full bounty of what was presented in all of the shows, and picking a few of the highlights. Here’s a snapshot of my five favorite, standout looks that I can’t wait to see worn once the weather starts getting warm next year.

Sandy Liang’s deconstructed creamy, dreamy dress
There’s something extra cool about a dress that’s romantic to begin with, but has been meticulously deconstructed. That’s what’s going on with this number. With its off-white hue and flowy layers, it’s artful enough to be worn on its own with some delicate jewelry and heels to a patio party, and original enough to counterbalance a moto jacket and black boots.

A model walks the runway for Sandy Liang during NYFW: The Shows at Abrons Arts Center on September 12, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images)

Rodarte’s acid yellow fringe dress

Rodarte has long been a creator of magical, almost surreal pieces in the fashion arena, bringing a trippy California vibe and dovetailing it with modern colors, strategically frayed fabrics and otherwise interesting spins on modern, handcrafted design. And that’s why the line’s all-fringe, all-bright yellow frock caught my eye. I can’t wait to see one light up a party.

Brandon Maxwell’s shimmer meets leather look

It was a match made in runway heaven: Flowy, feminine silks and satins in psychedelic swirls and endless shimmer were paired with casual T-shirts and structured leather and croc pieces. And it worked best in a look I could see wearing from a work meeting straight to dinner out: a blue pleated, holographic silk maxi skirt paired with a robin’s egg-blue leather jacket.

1631813553 923 The best looks for spring on the New York Fashion
A model walks the runway for Brandon Maxwell during New York Fashion Week. (Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Tom Ford’s head-to-toe purple

Ford truly loves to put on a show. And this one was full of celebratory color, sequins and silk cargo pants. I especially loved his head-to-toe lilac look — a deluge (and yet a still-very-wearable deluge) of deep purple knickers, a satin button-down shirt tied seductively at the waist and velvet smoking jacket. Whatever is going on with COVID next spring, it’s a look with in-person presence and — dare I say it — true exuberance.

1631813553 489 The best looks for spring on the New York Fashion
A model walks the runway for Tom Ford SS22 during NYFW: The Shows at David H. Koch Theater, Lincoln Center on September 12, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images)

Adam Lippes’ minimalist separates

Sometimes you just can’t beat an impeccably made, solid color piece that moves just the way you want it to. That’s the practical-but-ethereal sense you get from Adam Lippes in this latest collection, thanks to flowy and well-tailored pants in dusty rose, and white lace, pouf-sleeved blouses that evoke special occasions but are incredibly easy to toss on and wear just about anywhere.

 

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