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Store employees, a cop, and a photographer were among those killed in the Colorado shooting.

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Store employees, a cop, and a photographer were among those killed in the Colorado shooting.
Store employees, a cop, and a photographer were among those killed in the Colorado shooting.

Store employees, a cop, and a photographer were among those killed in the Colorado shooting.

 

 

Three people were shot and killed while working at a supermarket in Colorado. Another was a police officer who dashed in to save them and others from the attack, which claimed the lives of ten people.

After being treated at a hospital, the suspect in the killings was booked into prison on murder charges and a photo of the victims started to surface a day later.

The victims at the King Soopers store in Boulder ranged in age from 20 to 65 years old. A magazine reporter, a Medicare worker with a passion for theatre, and others went about their business in a crowded shopping plaza.

Denny Stong, 20; Neven Stanisic, 23; Rikki Olds, 25; Tralona Bartkowiak, 49; Eric Talley, 51; Suzanne Fountain, 59; Teri Leiker, 51; Kevin Mahoney, 61; Lynn Murray, 62; and Jodi Waters, 65; police Officer Eric Talley, 51; Suzanne Fountain, 59; Teri Leiker, 51; Kevin Mahoney, 61; Lynn Murray, 62; and

Former coworker Jordan Sailas, who never got the chance to carry his baby son into the store to meet Leiker, Olds, and Stong, said they worked at the supermarket.

TALLEY, ERIC

According to his father, he entered the Boulder Police Department in 2010 with a master’s degree in computer communications.

Homer “Shay” Talley, 74, told The Associated Press from his ranch in central Texas that he chose to help his community at the age of 40. “He quit his office work. He just wanted to help, so that’s exactly what he did. He was just having a good time with the cops.”

Boulder Police Chief Maris Herold said Eric Talley was the first to arrive after a call about shots being fired and someone holding a gun.

According to Boulder County District Attorney Michael Dougherty, Talley was “by all means, one of the outstanding officers” in the department.

Talley’s father described his son as a loving father who “knew the Lord” and had seven children ranging in age from 7 to 20.

“He ran for it while everyone else in the parking lot was running away,” Shay Talley said.

He went on to say, “We know where he is.” “He valued his family above all else. He was unconcerned about death. He didn’t want to bring them through it.”

In 1988, Talley completed high school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The superintendent of the school there expressed his condolences and praised “Officer Talley’s example to us all.”

LYNN MURRAY MURRAY MURRAY MURRAY MU

Murray had been seen shopping at King Soopers by a friend’s daughter. John Mackenzie, her husband, received word and drove to the shop, where he began texting his wife.

“I just fell over in my chair,” he said, choking up, after getting no answer in about five minutes.

Murray had a long career as a photographer for magazines like Cosmopolitan and Vogue, according to Mackenzie.

When they met at a photography studio in New York City years ago, he said, “she charmed the pants off me.” Backgammon on the computer quickly turned into a relationship and, ultimately, two children.

“Hands down, she’s the nicest girl I’ve ever met. She exuded the coolest freakin’ aura you’d ever want to discover. Mackenzie described her as “just a cool chick.” “She just did have it all together.”

Before he “lost it” Tuesday morning, he said he spent hours consoling their children. Mackenzie sent the following message:

“Don’t be afraid of something. None of the victims, including my mom, will ever want you to be afraid. They’d like you to be more daring and live a more daring life. That is the aim of this establishment.”

SUZANNE FOUNTAIN SUZANNE FOUNTAIN SUZANNE FOUNT

Fountain worked as a Medicare agent, doing intensive analysis to find the best supplemental benefits for older people enrolling in the federal health insurance program, according to her life partner Phi Bernier.

He said, “She never scrimped, she never did anything just because it was easier.”

Fountain attended the Circle in the Square Theater School, and the two met around 30 years ago while playing lead roles in “The Glass Menagerie,” according to Bernier. They dated for a while before reconnecting in 2013 when Fountain came to see him perform in a play.

Fountain was also the founder of eTown, a nonprofit live music venue in Boulder, prior to the pandemic.

In a Facebook post, the organization said, “Suzanne was a bright light to everyone she met, and we were honored to have her represent eTown in our group as she welcomed people into our space hundreds and hundreds of times.”

Both critics and those who worked with Fountain praised her performance.

Brian Miller, who worked with her on a show, told The Denver Post, “She was completely lovely, a natural, someone you just didn’t forget.”

Her 2002 success as a nurse in “Wit,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning play about a woman diagnosed with cancer, was praised by the Boulder Daily Camera as bringing “a clear but critical compassion to the play.”

RIKKI OLDS RIKKI OLDS RIKKI OLDS

Olds, a front-end manager at King Soopers, aspired to work her way up the store’s ranks, according to her family.

She was 25 years old, just starting out in life, bubbly, cheerful, and charismatic, according to her uncle Robert Olds.

He recalled his preschool-aged niece accompanying him and his sons to baseball tournaments and insisting on going to McDonald’s afterward.

Robert Olds said, “We are devastated.” He went on to say that one of her friends told the family that she had been trying to lock the store doors since the shooting started in the parking lot.

On the call, her grandmother sobbed as she identified the young woman she had a hand in raising.

Jeanette Olds, 71, of Lafayette, Colorado, described her as “just a very sweet and caring, bubbly girl who lit up the room when she came in.”

MAHONEY, KEVIN

His daughter Erika Mahoney said in a touching tweet that included a wedding picture and received a lot of publicity on social media that he “represents all things Love.”

“I’m so grateful he was able to walk me down the aisle last summer,” Mahoney, who works as the news director for a public radio station in California, said.

She also revealed that she is expecting a child and that her father “wishes for me to be strong for his granddaughter.”

TERI LEIKER TERI LEIKER TERI LEIKER

Band director Matt Dockendorf told The Denver Post that the former King Soopers employee enjoyed seeing the University of Colorado marching band participate in a kickoff celebration called the Pearl Street Stampede on Friday nights before home football games on the Boulder campus.

Dockendorf said, “She was there even before we began gathering, which was half an hour before the stampede started.” “She was just a regular,” says the narrator. She was like the band’s own cheerleader.”

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Schnucks changes hours because of ‘challenging labor market’

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Schnucks changes hours because of ‘challenging labor market’

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Schnucks says that they are updating their store hours because of the “challenging labor market” and evolving shopping patterns. Starting on October 4, 2021 most stores will be open from 6:00 am to 9:00 pm.

There are exceptions to the new hours. Nine St. Louis area stores will remain open until 10:00 pm. They include Arsenal, Cross Keys, Dorsett, Hampton Village, Ladue Crossing, Lindell, Loughborough, Richmond Center, and South City. The deli, meat, and seafood departments will be open daily from 10:00 am until 7:00 pm.

Schnucks is hosting a company-wide career fair to help fill a variety of positions. Anyone hired through the event who remains employed by Schnucks until January 2, 2022, is eligible for a performance and retention bonus. The career fair is on October 7 from 1:00-500 pm at all 111 stores.

Schnucks is offering a performance and retention bonus to some employees. They will get a bonus up to $600 bonus in January based on hours worked. This is the fourth bonus Schnucks has given employees since spring 2020.

New holiday hours have been announced for all Schnucks stores. This year the grocery chain is also closing on the day after Christmas.

Here is a list of all 2021 holiday days and hours:

Thanksgiving:

  • November 24 – Close at 9:00 pm
  • November 25 – Closed
  • November 26 – Open at 9:00 am

Christmas:

  • December 24 – Close at 5:30 pm
  • December 25 – Closed
  • December 26 – Closed
  • December 27 – Open at 6:00 am

New Years:

  • December 31 – Close at 8:00 pm
  • January 1 – Open at 9:00 am

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Missouri records 760 new COVID-19 cases; 4th time below 1,000 cases in September

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Missouri records 760 new COVID-19 cases; 4th time below 1,000 cases in September

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – For the fourth time in a month, Missouri has recorded less than 1,000 new COVID-19 cases. This comes as the state’s average number of cases drops to a 7-week low.

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, the state has recorded 672,849 cumulative cases of SARS-CoV-2—an increase of 760 positive cases (PCR testing only)—and 11,332 total deaths as of Monday, Sept. 27, no increase over yesterday. That’s a case fatality rate of 1.68%.

Please keep in mind that not all cases and deaths recorded occurred in the last 24 hours.

State health officials report 53.5% of the total population has received at least one dose of the vaccine. Approximately 64.8% of all adults 18 years of age and older have initiated the process.

The state has administered 54,707 doses of vaccine in the last 7 days (this metric is subject to a delay, meaning the last three days are not factored in). The highest vaccination rates are among people over 65.

The city of Joplin, St. Louis, St. Charles, and Boone counties are the only jurisdictions in the state with at least 50% of its population fully vaccinated. Eighteen other jurisdictions in the state are at least 40% fully vaccinated: Atchison, Cole, Jackson, Franklin, Greene, Jefferson, Cass, Nodaway, Andrew, Cape Girardeau, Ste. Genevieve, Carroll, Callaway, Gasconade, and Christian counties, as well as St. Louis City, Kansas City, and Independence.

Vaccination is the safest way to achieve herd immunity. Herd immunity for COVID-19 requires 80% to 90% of the population to have immunity, either by vaccination or recovery from the virus.

(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

The Bureau of Vital Records at DHSS performs a weekly linkage between deaths to the state and death certificates to improve quality and ensure all decedents that died of COVID-19 are reflected in the systems. As a result, the state’s death toll will see a sharp increase from time to time. Again, that does not mean a large number of deaths happened in one day; instead, it is a single-day reported increase.

At the state level, DHSS is not tracking probable or pending COVID deaths. Those numbers are not added to the state’s death count until confirmed in the disease surveillance system either by the county or through analysis of death certificates.

The 7-day rolling average for cases in Missouri sits at 1,367; yesterday, it was 1,387. Exactly one month ago, the state rolling average was 1,810. 

The 10 days with the most reported cases occurred between Oct. 10, 2020, and Jan. 8, 2021.

Approximately 49.4% of all reported cases are for individuals 39 years of age and younger. The state has further broken down the age groups into smaller units. The 18 to 24 age group has 83,277 recorded cases, while 25 to 29-year-olds have 57,527 cases.

People 80 years of age and older account for approximately 43.6% of all recorded deaths in the state.

Month / Year Missouri COVID cases*
(reported that month)
March 2020 1,327
April 2020 6,235
May 2020 5,585
June 2020 8,404
July 2020 28,772
August 2020 34,374
September 2020 41,416
October 2020 57,073
November 2020 116,576
December 2020 92,808
January 2021 66,249
February 2021 19,405
March 2021 11,150
April 2021 12,165
May 2021 9,913
June 2021 12,680
July 2021 42,780
August 2021 60,275
September 2021 41,822
(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

Missouri has administered 686,639 PCR tests for COVID-19 over the entirety of the pandemic and as of Sept. 26, 16.9% of those tests have come back positive. People who have received multiple PCR tests are not counted twice, according to the state health department.

According to the state health department’s COVID-19 Dashboard, “A PCR test looks for the viral RNA in the nose, throat, or other areas in the respiratory tract to determine if there is an active infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A positive PCR test means that the person has an active COVID-19 infection.”

The Missouri COVID Dashboard no longer includes the deduplicated method of testing when compiling the 7-day moving average of positive tests. The state is now only using the non-deduplicated method, which is the CDC’s preferred method. That number is calculated using the number of tests taken over the period since many people take multiple tests. Under this way of tabulating things, Missouri has a 9.3% positivity rate as of Sept. 24. Health officials exclude the most recent three days to ensure data accuracy when calculating the moving average.

The 7-day positivity rate was 4.5% on June 1, 10.2% on July 1, and 15.0% on Aug. 1.

As of Sept. 24, Missouri is reporting 1,543 COVID hospitalizations and a rolling 7-day average of 1,732. The remaining inpatient hospital bed capacity sits at 17% statewide. The state’s public health care metrics lag behind by three days due to reporting delays, especially on weekends. Keep in mind that the state counts all beds available and not just beds that are staffed by medical personnel.

On July 6, the 7-day rolling average for hospitalizations eclipsed the 1,000-person milestone for the first time in four months, with 1,013 patients. The 7-day average for hospitalizations had previously been over 1,000 from Sept. 16, 2020, to March 5, 2021.

On Aug. 5, the average eclipsed 2,000 patients for the first time in more than seven months. It was previously over 2,000 from Nov. 9, 2020, to Jan. 27, 2021.

The 2021 low point on the hospitalization average in Missouri was 655 on May 29.

Across the state, 405 COVID patients are in ICU beds, leaving the state’s remaining intensive care capacity at 18%.

If you have additional questions about the coronavirus, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is available at 877-435-8411.

As of Sept. 27, the CDC identified 42,850,746 cases of COVID-19 and 686,639 deaths across all 50 states and 9 U.S.-affiliated districts, jurisdictions, and affiliated territories, for a national case-fatality rate of 1.6%.

How do COVID deaths compare to other illnesses, like the flu or even the H1N1 pandemics of 1918 and 2009? It’s a common question.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), preliminary data on the 2018-2019 influenza season in the United States shows an estimated 35,520,883 cases and 34,157 deaths; that would mean a case-fatality rate of 0.09 percent. Case-fatality rates on previous seasons are as follows: 0.136 percent (2017-2018), 0.131 percent (2016-2017), 0.096 percent (2015-2016), and 0.17 percent (2014-2015).

The 1918 H1N1 epidemic, commonly referred to as the “Spanish Flu,” is estimated to have infected 29.4 million Americans and claimed 675,000 lives as a result; a case-fatality rate of 2.3 percent. The Spanish Flu claimed greater numbers of young people than typically expected from other influenzas.

Beginning in January 2009, another H1N1 virus—known as the “swine flu”—spread around the globe and was first detected in the US in April of that year. The CDC identified an estimated 60.8 million cases and 12,469 deaths; a 0.021 percent case-fatality rate.

For more information and updates regarding COVID mandates, data, and the vaccine, click here.

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Amtrak train that derailed was going just under speed limit

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Amtrak train that derailed was going just under speed limit

JOPLIN, Mont. (AP) — An Amtrak train that derailed in rural Montana over the weekend was going just under the speed limit at about 75 mph (121 kph) when it went off the track along a gradual curve, killing three people and possibly ejecting passengers, federal investigators said Monday.

ABC7 reports family members identified him as Zach Schneider from Fairview Heights, Illinois, just over the border from St. Louis.

Investigators do not know the cause of the accident, but they are studying video from the train and another locomotive that went over the same track a little over an hour earlier, National Transportation Safety Board Vice Chairman Bruce Landsberg said.

“We have experts that are studying the camera footage frame by frame to make sure that we see exactly what the engineer saw — or maybe didn’t see,” Landsberg said.

The train derailed before a switch in the line, where one set of tracks turned into two, on a stretch of track that had been inspected just two days before, he said.

The westbound Empire Builder was traveling from Chicago to Seattle when it left the tracks Saturday afternoon near Joplin, a town of about 200. The train, carrying 141 passengers and 16 crew members, had two locomotives and 10 cars, eight of which derailed, with some tipping onto their sides.

When asked about wooden ties that were seen along the side of the tracks, and whether there was recent maintenance on that section, Landsberg did not answer directly.

“That will be one of the questions that we look at,” he said. “Maintenance will be a really big concern for us. We don’t know, at this point, exactly what happened, whether it was a track issue, whether it was a mechanical issue with the train. So all of these things are open.”

He said a preliminary report on the derailment is expected within 30 days.

Investigators will look at “everything,” including the switch, wheels, axles and suspension systems, as well as the track geometry and condition, including any cracks, said Steven Ditmeyer, a rail consultant and former senior official at the Federal Railroad Administration. He said a switch like the one in Joplin would be controlled by the BNSF control center in Fort Worth, Texas.

Sometimes rail lines can become deformed by heat, creating buckles in the tracks known as sun kinks, Ditmeyer said. That was the cause of a derailment in northern Montana in August 1988, when an Empire Builder train veered off the tracks about 170 miles (274 kilometers) east in Saco, Montana.

The NTSB concluded that an inspection failed to catch a problem in the track, and officials did not warn trains to slow down on that stretch. The crew saw the track had shifted, but the train was going full speed and could not stop before derailing.

Temperatures were in the high 80s Saturday near Joplin, according to the National Weather Service.

Russ Quimby, a former rail-accident investigator for the NTSB, said heat is the most likely explanation. He is convinced because the locomotives in front did not derail, but eight lighter coach cars behind them did.

“This has all the earmarks of a track buckle also,” Quimby said. “Sometimes a locomotive, which is heavier, will make it through” a buckled track, “but the cars following won’t. You saw that in this accident,” he said.

A malfunction of the switch seems less likely, Quimby said, because the switch would have been inspected when the track was checked last week.

Another possibility was a defect in the rail, said railroad safety expert David Clarke, director of the Center for Transportation Research at the University of Tennessee. He noted that regular testing does not always catch such problems.

Speed was not a likely factor because trains on that line have systems that prevent excessive speeds and collisions, which appear to have worked in this case, Clarke said.

“Did the switch play some role? It might have been that the front of the train hit the switch and it started fish-tailing and that flipped the back part of the train,” Clarke said.

The site of the derailment is about 150 miles (241 kilometers) northeast of Helena, Montana, and about 30 miles (48 kilometers) from the Canadian border. The tracks cut through vast, golden brown wheat fields that were recently harvested and roughly parallel to U.S. Highway 2.

Allan Zarembski, director of the University of Delaware’s Railway Engineering and Safety Program, said he did not want to speculate but suspected the derailment stemmed from an issue with the track, train equipment or both.

Railways have “virtually eliminated” major derailments by human error after the implementation of a nationwide system called positive train control, which is designed to stop trains before an accident, Zarembski said.

The derailment comes as Congress works toward final passage of a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package that includes $66 billion to improve Amtrak service. That’s less than the $80 billion that President Joe Biden — who famously rode Amtrak from Delaware to Washington during his time in the Senate — originally asked for, but it would be the largest federal investment in passenger rail service since Amtrak was founded 50 years ago.

The biggest chunk of money would go toward repairs and improvements along the rail service’s congested 457-mile-long Northeast Corridor as well as intercity routes with higher commuter traffic. About $16 billion also is aimed at building out Amtrak’s national service to wider America, particularly in rural regions.

Amtrak CEO Bill Flynn said the company was working with the NTSB, the Federal Railroad Administration and local law enforcement and shared their “sense of urgency” to determine what happened in Montana.

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NHL Winter Classic tickets between Blues and Wild go on sale Wednesday

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NHL Winter Classic tickets between Blues and Wild go on sale Wednesday

CHESTERFIELD, Mo. – Cardinals Manager Mike Shildt, his wife Michelle, and brother-in-law Joe Morrisey are starting a business together in Chesterfield. They are opening a Stretch Zone franchise. The studios use a strapping system to isolate muscles for stretching.

“It is an amazing sports town, with the St. Louis Cardinals, St. Louis Blues, St. Louis City SC, and the best fans. Introducing this concept that I believe in, to athletes and fans alike, is really exciting for us and a great way to give back to the community,” writes Mike Shildt.

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Two ‘Show Me Cash’ tickets worth $30,000 sold in St. Louis County

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Two ‘Show Me Cash’ tickets worth $30,000 sold in St. Louis County

CHESTERFIELD, Mo. – Cardinals Manager Mike Shildt, his wife Michelle, and brother-in-law Joe Morrisey are starting a business together in Chesterfield. They are opening a Stretch Zone franchise. The studios use a strapping system to isolate muscles for stretching.

“It is an amazing sports town, with the St. Louis Cardinals, St. Louis Blues, St. Louis City SC, and the best fans. Introducing this concept that I believe in, to athletes and fans alike, is really exciting for us and a great way to give back to the community,” writes Mike Shildt.

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18-year-old sentenced to 30 years in prison for 2019 shooting that left teen dead

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Teen sentenced to life in prison for shooting death of Cherokee Trail rugby player

An 18-year-old Aurora man was sentenced to 30 years in prison for shooting and killing a teen in 2019, the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office announced Monday in a news release.

Edgar Hernandez-Flores in May pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for shooting a fellow Colorado Early College student, Jeremy Jamaal Rudolph, on March 18, 2019 near the intersection of East Sixth Avenue and Sable Boulevard in Aurora.

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Nuggets, Michael Porter Jr. agree to five-year, max extension, source says

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Nuggets, Michael Porter Jr. agree to five-year, max extension, source says

The Denver Nuggets have agreed to a five-year max rookie extension with forward Michael Porter Jr., a league source told The Denver Post.

The deal is worth up to $172 million unless Porter reaches designated max criteria, which could take the deal to $207 million.

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Illinois emergency rule requires hospitals, health care facilities to track staff vaccination records, test results

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Illinois emergency rule requires hospitals, health care facilities to track staff vaccination records, test results

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (NEXSTAR) — All hospitals and health care facilities in Illinois must begin keeping records that monitor vaccination status and Coronavirus test results for all of their staff, according to a new emergency rule issued by the state on Friday.

The Illinois Department of Public Health quietly filed the emergency rules with the Secretary of State’s office at the close of the first week under Governor Pritzker’s new vaccine mandate for health care workers. Pritzker’s mandate would require all workers at health care facilities and schools to be fully vaccinated or submit to weekly testing. The new reporting and record-keeping rules apply to hospitals, assisted living centers, skilled nursing facilities, sheltered care facilities, veterans homes, and a variety of other health care facilities licensed with the state, and go into effect immediately.

“Each establishment shall maintain a record of fully vaccinated staff, unvaccinated staff, and weekly testing,” the rules say, though they offer no specific instructions on how facilities should report that information to the state.

“The emergency rule is silent on how they are going to collect,” Danny Chun with the Illinois Health and Hospital Association said in a phone call on Monday. “You can’t just turn on a light switch and start a new reporting system ‘effective immediately.’”

The new emergency rules don’t appear to allow any room for unvaccinated health care workers to decline a Coronavirus test.

“Staff who are not fully vaccinated may be permitted to enter or work at the establishment while they are waiting to receive the results of their weekly test,” the rules say. Otherwise, the state rules mandate that any workers who refuse the vaccine for religious or medical reasons “shall undergo the testing requirements.”

The Illinois Health Care Right of Conscience Act says, “It is the public policy of the State of Illinois to respect and protect the right of conscience of all persons who refuse to obtain, receive or accept…health care services and medical care…and to prohibit all forms of discrimination, disqualification, coercion, disability or imposition of liability upon such persons or entities by reason of their refusing to act contrary to their conscience or conscientious convictions in providing, paying for, or refusing to obtain, receive, accept, deliver, pay for, or arrange for the payment of health care services and medical care.”

When asked last week if his new executive orders mandating vaccines and tests clashed with state law, Pritzker dodged the legal question, and shifted the focus to public safety.

“What we put in place is something that is workable, something that the vast majority of people are going to be following,” Pritzker responded. “I know that there are people who are attempting to challenge these things in court. I would just say that this is a very unhelpful thing to do, and it is going to make schools and healthcare settings less safe.”

New medical research released by the CDC earlier this month showed unvaccinated people were 10 times more likely to be hospitalized and 11 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than people who were fully vaccinated.

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Facebook puts Instagram for kids on hold after pushback

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Facebook puts Instagram for kids on hold after pushback

Facebook is putting a hold on the development of a kids’ version of Instagram, geared toward children under 13, to address concerns that have been raised about the vulnerability of younger users.

“I still firmly believe that it’s a good thing to build a version of Instagram that’s designed to be safe for tweens, but we want to take the time to talk to parents and researchers and safety experts and get to more consensus about how to move forward,” said Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, in an interview Monday on NBC’s “Today” show.

The announcement follows an investigative series by The Wall Street Journal which reported that Facebook was aware that the use of Instagram by some teenage girls led to mental health issues and anxiety.

Yet the development of Instagram for a younger audience was met with broader opposition almost immediately.

Facebook announced the development of an Instagram Kids app in March, saying at the time that it was “exploring a parent-controlled experience.” Two months later, a bipartisan group of 44 attorneys general wrote to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, urging him to abandon the project, citing the well being of children.

They cited increased cyberbullying, possible vulnerability to online predators, and what they called Facebook’s “checkered record” in protecting children on its platforms. Facebook faced similar criticism in 2017 when it launched the Messenger Kids app, touted as a way for children to chat with family members and friends approved by parents.

Josh Golin, executive director of children’s digital advocacy group Fairplay, urged the company Monday to permanently pull the plug on the app. So did a group of Democratic members of Congress.

“Facebook is heeding our calls to stop plowing ahead with plans to launch a version of Instagram for kids,” tweeted Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey. “But a ‘pause’ is insufficient. Facebook must completely abandon this project.”

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Haunted house actor accidentally stabs boy he was trying to scare, police say

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Haunted house actor accidentally stabs boy he was trying to scare, police say

BEREA, Ohio (WJW)– An actor at an Ohio haunted house accidentally stabbed an 11-year-old boy on Saturday, police said. Officers were called to the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds in Berea shortly after 8 p.m.

The boy arrived at the haunted house and was approached by one of the actors who was carrying a large bowie knife. The police report said the 22-year-old man scraped the knife along the ground in the front of the group and then stabbed at the ground near the boy’s feet to scare him.

The knife went through the child’s Croc-style shoe and cut his toe. Staff and officers treated his injury, then the boy put his shoe back on and insisted on finishing the haunted house.

Police said the actor admitted that using the knife was a bad idea. He said he didn’t intend to hurt anyone.

Officers confiscated the knife, and the boy’s mother requested no criminal charges.

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