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An extremely rare Japanese whisky once sold for $795,000 is now being offered again for $60,000

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Yamazaki 55 gets international release

Renowned Japanese whisky maker Suntory is gifting the world with its oldest release yet but at a much higher price than when it was initially released in Japan.

A taste of history: The Yamazaki 55, the oldest single malt Japanese whisky release in House of Suntory’s history, has a “deep amber color; robust aroma redolent of sandalwood and well-ripened fruit; sweet, slightly bitter and woody palate; and slightly bitter yet sweet and rich finish,” according to a press release.In 2020, the company initially released just 100 bottles of the 55-year-old whisky, which were sold via a form of lottery for $27,000 (or 3 million yen), Forbes reported.

Later that year, a Yamazaki 55 bottle was purchased for around $795,000 at an auction.According to the company, the release honors the legacy of “three generations of Master Blenders” as well as “the founding family of Japanese whisky.”Components of the blend were “distilled in 1960 under the supervision of Suntory’s founder Shinjiro Torii and then aged in Mizunara casks; and in 1964 under Suntory’s Second Master Blender Keizo Saji and then aged in White Oak casks. Suntory’s Fifth-Generation Chief Blender Shinji Fukuyo worked closely with Third-Generation Master Blender Shingo Torii.”

Fukuyo said that during the blending process of Yamazaki 55, he was inspired by “the passage of time and ‘Wabi-sabi’ – the Japanese belief that imperfections can help to ultimately contribute to perfection.”He added that he considers the resulting expression to be more like a “Buddhist statue: calm and mysterious, requiring time to truly enjoy the inner beauty.”Highly anticipated release: This month, limited quantities of Yamazaki 55 will be available in the U.S., the U.K., Mainland China and Taiwan with the same allocation and packaging, but at a more expensive price of $60,000. Beam Suntory, the American subsidiary of the Japanese company, has pledged to donate $5,000 for every bottle in the 100-bottle international release to the White Oak Initiative.

This organization works to ensure white oak forests’ long-term sustainability in the U.S. The official tasting notes said the expression treats the palate to a “mixture of sweet and slightly bitter, followed by a woody note from the Mizunara cask.”Yamazaki 55 reportedly has a “slightly bitter, a fragrance like scented wood and a hint of smokiness,” which amounts to a “sweet, rich, lingering finish.”

According to Robb Report, the initial sip from the whisky provides a “shock, soft and rich, almost rum-like in its sweetness, which transitions beautifully into Yamazaki’s characteristic tropical fruit notes. Then, a mildly bitter nuttiness with strong hints of smoked wood leading into a long, lingering finish, sweet and lightly smoky.”

Many people might not know this, but despite our large and loyal following which we are immensely grateful for, NextShark is still a small bootstrapped startup that runs on no outside funding or loans.Everything you see today is built on the backs of warriors who have sacrificed opportunities to help give Asians all over the world a bigger voice.

However, we still face many trials and tribulations in our industry, from figuring out the most sustainable business model for independent media companies to facing the current COVID-19 pandemic decimating advertising revenues across the board.We hope you consider making a contribution so we can continue to provide you with quality content that informs, educates and inspires the Asian community.

Even a $1 contribution goes a long way. Thank you for everyone’s support. We love you all and can’t appreciate you guys enough.

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More Colorado concerts canceled, postponed as frustrated ticket-holders get $3 million refund

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More Colorado concerts canceled, postponed as frustrated ticket-holders get $3 million refund

Head-spinning, COVID-related concert news continued this week as touring artists shelved local shows due to health concerns, even as promoters continued selling tickets to dozens of newly announced, metro-area events.

The mixed messages from the music industry follow increasingly tight COVID rules at music and sports venues, including the largest ones booked by corporate promoters AEG Presents Rocky Mountains and Live Nation. All concerts at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Mission Ballroom, the Fillmore Auditorium and most other large venues now require concertgoers to be masked and provide proof of vaccination.

A few touring artists have brought even more measures to bear, in some cases canceling shows at venues that can’t or won’t accommodate their stricter rules. That includes Canadian crooner Michael Buble’s cancellation this week of a Sept. 20 show in Austin, Texas.

But there was good news, too: On Tuesday, Attorney General Phil Weiser announced that 8,688 Colorado ticket-holders who had been on the hook with San Francisco-based ticket reseller Stubhub will receive refunds totaling $3,120,442, or about $359 per ticket-holder.

The refunds apply to people who bought tickets under the company’s pre-pandemic refund policy for events that were canceled due to COVID-19, investigators said. Instead of honoring its “FanProtect Guarantee” — that the purchase price and fees for all shows would be refunded if the events were canceled — Stubhub stiffed its customers starting in March 2020.

The company instead said that ticket-holders would receive account credits equal to 120% of their purchases, to be used for future events, while denying them their money.

“Consumers should not be out of their money when a service they paid for was never provided,” Weiser said in a press statement. “My office is committed to protecting consumers, and we will continue to take action to ensure that consumers, like those of Stubhub, receive the refunds they are owed.”

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Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His $17.9 Million Pacific Palisades Mansion

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Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His $17.9 Million Pacific Palisades Mansion
Matt Damon is parting ways with his Pacific Palisades mansion.

Just over a month after Matt Damon lowered the price of his Pacific Palisades mansion down to $17.9 million, the actor has found a buyer for the home. Damon and his wife, Luciana Barroso, first listed the palatial 13,508-square-foot abode for a hefty $21 million in January 2021, but didn’t manage to net any major interest from potential buyers.

The over $3 million discount seems to have done the trick, as Damon and Barroso have accepted an offer on the Los Angeles estate, as first spotted by the New York Post.

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1631891187 598 Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His 179 Million Pacific
The sprawling home spans 13,508 square feet.

Even though Damon had to lower his expectations a tad, if he scores the entire ask, he’s still netting a profit from the $15 million he paid for the California property back in 2012.

An atrium with 35-foot mahogany ceilings leads into the airy, Zen-inspired home, per the listing held by The Agency broker Eric Haskell. There’s an open living room with a stone fireplace, as well as a dining room with a wall of glass.

The sleek kitchen is equipped with dark wood cabinetry, stainless steel appliances, marble countertops and a center island, and is open to a family room that, in turn, leads to the backyard via sliding glass doors.

1631891187 341 Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His 179 Million Pacific
There’s wine storage and a tasting room. Courtesy Alexis Adams/The Agency

Elsewhere in the home, there’s a game room, office, bar and movie theater, as well as a wine cellar (complete with a private tasting room) on the lower level.

The owner’s suite is outfitted with two dressing rooms complete with wood built-ins, in addition to a bathroom with a soaking tub and separate glass-enclosed shower.

Outside, there’s a pool and a spa, a waterfall and a very crucial koi pond, as well as various lounging and entertaining spaces, including a covered lanai for an al fresco dining situation.

1631891187 91 Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His 179 Million Pacific
The atrium features 35-foot mahogany ceilings. Courtesy Alexis Adams/The Agency

Damon and Barroso decided to sell their Pacific Palisades home of nearly 10 years because they’re just not spending that much time on the West Coast anymore; they relocated to New York with their four children earlier this year, as the couple finally moved into their massive penthouse in Brooklyn Heights, for which they paid a reported $16.75 million in 2018.

Matt Damon Found a Buyer for His $17.9 Million Pacific Palisades Mansion

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‘My heart bled for them’: Director Justin Chon’s ‘Blue Bayou’ aims to change the fate of American adoptees facing deportation

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blue bayou justin chon adoptees deportation

In a shotgun home in the Louisiana bayou, a Korean adoptee’s small-town world is rocked when he finds out that in the 30 years he’s lived in America, he is not considered a citizen and is at risk of deportation.

Justin Chon, the writer, director and star behind “Blue Bayou” plays the character Antonio LeBlanc, a financially struggling New Orleans-based tattoo artist who was adopted from South Korea when he was 3. The film peers into the lives of Antonio and his pregnant wife Kathy, played by Alicia Vikander, as parents of Kathy’s young daughter from a previous marriage.

The first scene opens with Antonio in a job interview that feels more like an interrogation as the disembodied voice of a motorcycle shop owner poses a familiar and microaggressive question, “Where are you from?” and then immediately presses with “What did you steal?”

Antonio is a flawed character and Chon intended for him to be that way. “I wanted to tell a story of a real person, not a perfect individual,” he told Vanity Fair. “This film represents what America feels like and looks like.”

The character sports a small rap sheet of two felonies for stealing motorcycles in his youth. He’s since moved past that and wants to continue living a quiet life with his family, but his story gets muddied after a racist encounter is escalated and immigration services are brought in. The couple are then left to deal with the titanic revelation of his possible deportation to South Korea.

It’s a devastating reality for adoptees brought to the U.S. and who’ve only ever known life in it. 

Chon spent over five years researching, reading articles and listening to stories from Korean American adoptee friends about the underbelly of a flawed and crushingly rigid adoption and foster care system that stranded thousands of adoptees without many options.

Between loopholes and faulty, incomplete paperwork from their adoptive parents, “these people, now adults, would find out that they were never officially U.S. citizens,” Chon told NextShark.

Specifically for Korean adoptees, the Korean War orphaned and separated around 2 million children from their families. In 1953, Congress passed the Refugee Relief Act, which would enable thousands of Korean adoptees to immigrate to the U.S. under visas. Two years later, it was when evangelical Christians Harry and Bertha Holt adopted eight Korean War orphans, and later facilitated the process for others through the Holt International adoption agency, that more Americans were racing to adopt these displaced children.

Treated like a hot commodity and like they were in desperate need of “saving,” the number of adoptions from Korea continued to grow until more than 160,000 Korean children were adopted into Western homes in the years following the war and required a lengthy naturalization process, NPR reported.

In 2000, a sliver of hope was given to children from other countries who were under 18. Congress passed the Child Citizenship Act that protected them and gave them automatic citizenship, according to NBC Washington. But this left out the adoptees who were brought over during the ‘70s and ‘80s and had already built established lives at the age of 40 or 50. They would be doomed to starting over and going back to a “motherland” they have nothing but birth ties to.

“I was absolutely appalled,” Chon said. “My heart bled for them and figured that people needed to know.”

“Listen to him, look at him, he’s American,” Kathy says in an impassioned plea to an immigration lawyer in one of the film’s released clips. Her husband speaks with a Southern drawl, has a large eagle tattoo defiantly emblazoned across his neck and is the father of two children. Yet the titanic revelation of a looming deportation to South Korea begs the elusive question: “Who gets to decide who is American?” and “What does it mean to be American?”

Chon wants the viewer to empathize with these characters, with the Asian community who are made to feel like perpetual foreigners despite their birth status and with these adoptees who represent an overlooked part of America. He said the film “represents the idea of who we choose as our families.”

It’s also part of the reason why he got attached to the script, wound up playing Antonio and cast actors who weren’t American. He wanted them to study what it meant to be one, to define it for themselves, and to “make more intentional choices” in their acting, he told Dig IN Magazine. Vikander, who is from Sweden, took extra steps to submerge herself into it—thinking of every detail, down to her hair and the scrubs she wears as a physical therapist in the film.


(Exclusive clip courtesy of Focus Features)

“As the country continues to grow and evolve I think it’s important to look at ourselves and become more tolerant of one another,” he said. “It’s the reason I placed the film in the South. It’s not a red or blue issue but rather a film that hopefully sparks honest conversations.”

As a filmmaker, he opts to use his creative strengths in storytelling to change this bleak narrative. By empathizing with Antonio’s story, he hopes to bring enough awareness to have it shared and eventually reach the eyes of a legislator, while also serving as a warning to the large number of Asian American adoptees who aren’t aware that they are undocumented.

“If the right people see it, the right people share it, maybe the right person picks it up and there can be some legislation change, and someone who is going through this can stay and someone who has been deported can come back,” he said.

He also believes that the community needs to take more creative liberties and “branch out of just our own Asian ethnicities and tell each other’s stories respectfully” to build more unity and cohesion.

“I feel like the conversation a lot of the time focuses on Koreans, Japanese and Chinese people. We need to use our platforms for our Southeast Asian counterparts as well. It’s the reason that my next film will focus on Indonesian characters,” Chon said, referring to the one he finished filming with musician Rich Brian a few days ago and features an Indonesian father and son.

His biggest goal for his films is for people to “think about the characters one more time” as they lay in bed—that’s when he considers it a success.

“Blue Bayou” will debut in theaters on Sept. 17.

Featured Image via Focus Features (left, right)
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Caine & Plaza chemistry make ‘Best Sellers’ a must-watch

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Caine & Plaza chemistry make ‘Best Sellers’ a must-watch

MOVIE REVIEW

“BEST SELLERS”

Not rated. On VOD.

Grade: A-

Can anyone have anticipated a scenario in which Michael Caine and Aubrey Plaza play a variation of “The Odd Couple”? In the small, gem-like, screwball comedy “Best Sellers,” Plaza plays Lucy Stanbridge, a young, rich, well-educated woman who inherits a venerable New York publishing house from her father. The house is in trouble and on the verge of being sold off at a loss to former executive Jack Sinclair (Scott Speedman), who was once romantically involved with Lucy, although things have chilled down.

Aubrey Plaza in ‘Best Sellers.’

Lucy and her wryly funny assistant Rachel Spence (an indispensable Ellen Wong) are desperate to find a best seller to publish to save the company. The only candidate they come up with is Harris Shaw (Michael Caine), who hasn’t published a book in 50 years. But his first and only effort, “Atomic Autumn,” which Lucy’s father supposedly carefully edited, was a smash hit, and an old contract confirms that Harris owes them a book. The set-up is simple, elegant and full of potential.

Directed by first-time feature filmmaker and actor Lina Roessler, “Best Sellers” has the nerve to open to the sound of someone pounding on a typewriter, something some people in the audience might not recognize. Harris, an old, angry geezer and widower, picks up a ringing phone and spews the words, “He’s dead; bugger off,” into it and hangs up. We see him type the words THE END at the bottom of a page. We learn something of Harris’s background. He was “thrown out of Ireland” and lives in Westchester, N.Y. (the film was shot in Quebec). He’s a “drunk, a recluse and a madman.” His house faces imminent foreclosure.

Thus, he is persuaded by Lucy to go on a book tour to promote “The Future is X-Rated,” his newest effort, a bleak, “Children of Men”-type, extinction-level work of dystopiana. But instead of reading from the book, Shaw, who shares his name with a certain Anglo-Irish playwright and polemicist, scandalously reads a missive from the letter section of a 1977 issue of Penthouse Magazine. Harris catchphrase “It’s all bullshite” is trending. Twitter loves the curmudgeon.

Lucy, who has to learn to drive Shaw’s oddly reliable, right-hand drive vintage Jaguar, goes on the road, touring dive bars with the old man, who sits in the back of the Jag, smoking cigars and dozing. It’s clear that as much as she disapproves of Shaw’s outrageous behavior, Lucy grows increasingly fond of him.

Caine, 88, has a blast acting like the most scandalous member of the Sex Pistols. Plaza, a gifted comic actor with a razor-sharp. sarcastic screen presence, has not had this sort of chemistry with a male colleague, maybe ever. For his part, Caine does very little outside of talking to his beloved dead wife, to make Shaw likable.

Actor-screenwriter Anthony Grieco sticks to the rules of the traditional screwball comedy. But instead of a romance, he gives us a surrogate father-daughter bond. Shaw rubs off on Lucy, and she becomes more and more like the old man, chanting, “It’s all bullshite,” with the hipsters at the bars, enjoying long swigs of neat Johnnie Walker Black Label and smoking the old man’s cigars. Later, she will quote his favorite lines from “The Great Gatsby.” Apparently, these two were meant for each other. But their “romance” has little future.

That’s the Kinks performing “Last of the Steam-Powered Trains” over the final credits, a suitable send-off for this very pleasant surprise.

(“Best Sellers” contains profanity, drunkenness and a scene in which someone pees on a burning book.)

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Thousands without power in Twin Cities following early Friday morning storm

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Thousands without power in Twin Cities following early Friday morning storm

Residents in the East Metro awoke Friday morning to downed trees and power outages following a thunderstorm that blew through the area about 3 a.m.

As of 8 a.m., about 50,000 Xcel Energy customers in Minnesota and 11,000 in western Wisconsin were without power. Dakota Electric, which has customers in Dakota, Goodhue, Rice and Scott counties, reported about 3,000 without power.

“We just thank people for their patience,” said Joe Miller, spokesman for Dakota Electric. “I think it’s been a number of years since we saw something this significant move through our area. We’ve got all crews out there working to restore power as quickly and safely as possible.”

Xcel had about 300 employees and contractors out working to restore power Friday morning, with more expected to be added later today, the company said in a statement.

In St. Paul, 5,757 Xcel customers lost power. Stillwater reported about 3,190 and in Hudson, 7,691 were in the dark.

Dakota Electric customers were hardest hit in Burnsville, Apple Valley and Eagan, Miller said.

The company could not give specifics, as the power outage map on its website had been knocked offline.

Residents out and about Friday are cautioned to stay away from downed power lines. Always assume an electric line, even one that is on or near the ground, is energized and dangerous. Never touch or move a downed power line. Downed power lines should be reported immediately by calling 1-800-895-1999.

The overnight storms also delayed classes at several schools across the metro including Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan schoo, district.

“Due to significant storm damage in parts of the district, all schools will start two hours late today, September 17, 2021. Rosemount Elementary and Rosemount Middle are canceled as Xcel Energy works to restore power. All after-school activities and events are also canceled at these schools,” the district said in a post on social media.

Stillwater Area Schools also announced delays and, in some cases, canceled in-person instruction due to the storms. For more information go to https://www.stillwaterschools.org/

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Unvaccinated New Yorkers with event tickets facing dilemma

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Unvaccinated New Yorkers with event tickets facing dilemma

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) — Following a bombshell announcement from Gov. Kathy Hochul about vaccine requirements at sports events, many ticketholders were left with questions.

If roughly 30% of Erie County is not vaccinated, that means several thousand fans with tickets now have a little over a week to decide whether to get their first shot or sell their tickets. One, Kylie, is selling her floor seat tickets for the Eric Church concert 10 days before he performs at the KeyBank Center.

She says she doesn’t feel comfortable getting the vaccine as required. “Those that are going, I hope they enjoy the concerts, and those that can’t, stand your ground and do what you think is right for yourself,” Kylie said.

Kristen Pachucki is also selling her tickets on Facebook for less than face value because she can’t be sure she’ll get a refund. “We’ve contacted the insurance company because we did get insurance on them, and we’ve also contacted Ticketmaster and Key Bank, and we’ve heard nothing,” she said. “Except Ticketmaster said that currently, their policy is not changing.”

Nick Giammusso runs VIP TIX, which resells tickets. He said that, even though Bills season ticket holders can get a refund if they commit by Friday night, they would lose their seniority. “It’s frustrating because we don’t have the answers right now,” Giammusso said. “Fans would use a service like ours to resell their tickets so they could keep their seniority.”

Attorney Corey Hogan says his office is considering legal action based on the flood of calls he’s received over the vaccine requirement at both Highmark Stadium and KeyBank Center. “Probably have now received between 75 and a hundred calls from obviously very upset, disgruntled fans feeling that the Bills have pulled the rug out from underneath them,” he said.

Many Bills tickets and concert tickets will likely sell for less than market value over the coming days because of this new rule and the uncertainty of refunds.

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Colorado extends $11.3 million in tax incentives to four companies

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Colorado extends $11.3 million in tax incentives to four companies

The Colorado Economic Development Commission on Thursday morning approved $11.3 million worth of job growth incentive tax credits to four companies that are considering the creation of 610 jobs over the next eight years in the state.

The largest of the awards, worth up to $7.7 million, went to a foreign maker of medical devices and health care technology products that was given the code name Project Tempus to protect its identity. The company is looking to set up a North American headquarters as well as a global headquarters for one of its subsidiaries.

The company told the state that it is looking to create 300 jobs at an average annual wage of $154,957, double the average annual wage in Denver. The positions are in management, administration, marketing and finance.

“Our challenge right now is that we have team members residing in the U.S. We are really trying to find a North American headquarters. We want to bring together several hundred people,” said a representative for the company, which is also looking at locations in Texas and New Jersey.

Project Linin, an early-stage company working on a molecular detection technology that can detect foodborne pathogens rapidly, received approval for $1.4 million in credits in return for the creation of 144 net new jobs paying an average annual wage of $124,573.

The jobs will include microbiologists, production and test engineers, sales and marketing and managers. The company, currently based in California, is considering metro Denver, Austin or the Bay Area for a headquarters, and research and development and production facilities.

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Franks: We can’t let inner-city Catholic schools go extinct

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Franks: We can’t let inner-city Catholic schools go extinct

A former Catholic cardinal, Theodore McCarrick, is facing trial on charges of sexually assaulting a 16-year-old boy. He is the only current or former U.S. cardinal to be criminally charged with child sex crimes.

The Catholic Church has been paying millions of dollars to settle such cases for decades. Inner-city children (Black and Hispanic) are suffering the collateral damage.

The Archdiocese of Hartford paid more than $50 million to settle abuse allegations against dozens of its priests. The archdiocese admitted in a financial statement that such payments harmed its ability to provide other services. Among its major assets would be school buildings.

Connecticut could be on the verge of ending Catholic school choice for inner-city high school kids, with only one such school left, Kolbe Cathedral.

Just imagine if the state’s public schools denied inner-city children the opportunity to get an education but allowed students from white communities to have that opportunity. The entire nation would be outraged. Now imagine the villain in this scenario is a very unlikely institution: the Catholic Church and its Catholic schools. The church is allowing white communities to have an opportunity at a Catholic school education in neighborhood high schools while denying the same opportunity to Black and Hispanic students by closing all of its inner-city Catholic high schools in Connecticut. It could rightly be called discriminatory.

The record is clear. After the closing of seven inner-city Catholic high schools, there will be only one Catholic high school in Connecticut not in an affluent white community. The schools can try to segregate themselves like the schools in the South did in the 20th century, prompting the Brown v. Board of Education decision. But like Bob Jones University in the 1980s, which also condoned discriminatory practices, these schools cannot be allowed to receive federal funding and, in most states, state funding.

The graduation rates at Catholic schools in Connecticut are much higher than at most inner-city public schools. The prospects for college scholarships are much better in Catholic schools, and the values that a Catholic high school education offers are superior as well, in my opinion.

Yet, the Catholic high schools for inner-city children in Connecticut are on the verge of extinction, soon to become a memory and thing of the past, ending Catholic school choice for inner-city high school kids.

Connecticut is not an aberration. Inner-city Catholic schools have been closing nationwide.

There are many thousands of Blacks and Hispanics who have benefited from a Catholic education. All of us would owe a part of our success in life to having this opportunity. As possibly the first Black product of a Catholic high school education to enter Congress, I find the pulling up of the “ladder of opportunity” on millions of other Black people and Hispanics by the Catholic Church very disheartening. Let us pray that something positive can happen. We must not hurt those who are in the greatest need of help.


Gary Franks is a former U.S. representative from Connecticut and visiting professor/adjunct at Hampton University, Georgetown University and the University of Virginia. He is now a public policy consultant and columnist.

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Phase II Schenectady’s ‘smart city’ project

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Phase II Schenectady’s ‘smart city’ project

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Thursday, the City of Schenectady and National Grid kicked off Phase two of an innovative project that will transform neighbors into a “smart city” through advanced technology deployed on National Grid’s streetlight infrastructure.

The City has partnered with National Grid in advanced LED streetlights and expanding public access to Wi-fi in neighborhoods.

“By expanding our deployment of advanced LED streetlights, public Wi-Fi, and smart city technologies throughout our neighborhoods, Mayor McCarthy said. “We can bridge the digital divide, increase internet access, and improve quality of life for residents in our community.”

All 4,200 of National Grid’s high-pressure sodium streetlights across the entire city will be replaced
using energy-efficient advanced LED streetlights outfitted with network lighting controls, which will improve lighting services, automatic outage detection, and create dimming scheduled during off-peak hours to enable additional energy savings.

In addition to a connected network of advanced LED streetlights, the City of Schenectady plans to evaluate “smart city” technologies of each zone to improve municipal services such as public safety, traffic management, planning, and environmental sustainability.

In Phase One of the project, National Grid completed streetlight replacement in Zones A and B,
approximately half of the City of Schenectady, including the Stockade, Hamilton Hill, and parts of
the Central State Street, Goose Hill, and Mont Pleasant neighborhoods.

For additional information on the National Grid REV Demo Project, please visit the City of Schenectady’s website.

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Rare white squirrel spotted in Staunton State Park

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Rare white squirrel spotted in Staunton State Park

A leucistic squirrel, commonly known as a white squirrel, was spotted and captured on video in Staunton State Park.

A Colorado Parks and Wildlife Twitter post from Sept. 10 of the sighting includes a still frame image and a 17-second video clip of the squirrel scampering up a pine tree.

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