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Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi-George declare victory in Boston mayoral preliminary

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Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi-George declare victory in Boston mayoral preliminary

Either Michelle Wu or Annissa Essaibi-George will be Boston’s next mayor, the voters appear to have decided in a historic preliminary election that advanced the two female city councilors to the November general.

Wu, a 36-year-old at-large councilor from Roslindale who’s commanded solid polling leads in the race, was the first to declare victory, doing so shortly after 10 p.m., two hours after polls closed.

Essaibi-George, a 47-year-old at-large councilor from Dorchester, followed about an hour and a half later as Acting Mayor Kim Janey and City Councilor Andrea Campbell conceded.

“I’m overjoyed to share with you in our home neighborhood of Roslindale that we are confident that we are in the top two,” Wu told several hundred supporters who gathered at Distraction Brewing Co. to watch as the results came in.

“I’m grateful for everyone’s love and support,” Essaibi-George said in her late-night speech at the Venezia Restaurant in Dorchester. “Your voices must drive the work in City Hall. You voices will drive the work in City Hall.”

The vote count remains unofficial — and slow. City election workers scrambled late into Tuesday night to count more than 7,000 mail-in ballots received on Election Day, which had to be cross-referenced with the completed voter lists returned from each polling location, officials said, vowing all ballots would be counted that night. As of 6 p.m. more than 83,600 votes were cast.

Well after midnight, the city’s elections department website showed not a single precinct reporting.

But in a a morning update, the city posted it’s full unofficial report.

With 100% of precincts reporting, Wu claimed first with 35,888 votes, representing 33% of the ballots. Essaibi George was in second with 24,186, for 22%.

Separated by fewer than 300 votes were Andrea Campbell, with 21,221 and Kim Janey with 20,946.

The candidates maintained Wednesday morning that they had been tracking votes on their own through the evening.

Boston’s election systems are nonpartisan; this is a preliminary election, where the top two overall vote-getters make it through to the Nov. 2 general.

All five major candidates in the historic field were people of color in a city that’s never elected anyone besides a white man. Either Wu, whose parents are from Taiwan, or Essaibi-George, whose father is Tunisian and mother was born in a displaced-persons camp in Poland, will be the first woman and first person of color to be elected mayor of Boston.

“Boston is changing — the policies, the politics, who is at the table together,” Wu said during her 15-minute victory speech in which she said she was “humbled” to share a ballot with so many other people of color.

Campbell, who was locked in a tight race for the second ticket for the general with Essaibi-George. and Janey, conceded just before 11:30 p.m., telling supporters at her Grove Hall event to “hold your heads up high” and vowing to “continue to push” for equity in education, public health and more.

Janey never showed at her own party in the South End. Her campaign simply sent everyone home and then emailed a statement to reporters conceding and congratulating Wu and Essaibi-George.

The Wu-Essaibi-George clash between two politicians with different views on governance is full of storylines that write themselves. A staunch progressive in Wu against a more centrist Essaibi-George; an ally of former Mayor Martin Walsh — Essaibi-George — against Wu, his frequent antagonist; the idea to reallocate money from the police department versus adding officers.

Both women, who served on the council together since 2016, alluded to this in their speeches. Wu said this was the time for Boston to move away from the “status quo” and toward big ideas, while Essaibi-George garnered big cheers when she took a couple of shots at a couple of Wu’s big-banner policy goals in making the MBTA free and implementing rent control.

This race began to get in gear a year ago when Wu and then Campbell both jumped into the race last September against Walsh. Walsh, a popular incumbent, was gearing up for a run at a third term when he shocked the Boston political world by becoming President Joe Biden’s pick for Labor secretary — a job about which he’d pooh-poohed rumors for months.

Walsh’s departure wasn’t set in stone until March 22, but it was quickly apparent he wasn’t long for this city. That opened the floodgates, with Essaibi-George and city economic development director John Barros — two Walsh supporters — to dive into the race. State Rep. Jon Santiago also jumped in, but he dropped out in July and has since backed Janey.

Rumors swirled around other candidates, including the resigning Police Commissioner William Gross, Sheriff Steve Tompkins and state Sen. Nick Collins, but they all ultimately didn’t run themselves. Gross has since endorsed Essaibi-George, and Tompkins supports Wu.

The race — which has continued to play out under varying levels of pandemic restrictions — was largely quiet throughout the spring and summer, with candidates opting to focus on raising money and beefing up their own organizations rather than making splashy headlines and attacking each other.

But that’s changed over the past month, as multiple candidates — mostly Campbell, but also Essaibi-George and Barros, to some extent — have trained their fire on Janey, using the acting mayor as a foil, creating news stories with criticisms that they’ve used to tout their own policy pushes.

Each of the candidates made their own pitch to voters. Wu, who conventional wisdom and polling alike had shown to be a frontrunner and the expected recipient of the first ticket into the general, framed herself along ideological lines as the big-ideas true progressive in the race, the woman with the plans, like her mentor U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who campaigned for her over the weekend.

Essaibi-George also went with an ideological pitch to some extent, framing herself as something of a centrist candidate who supported law enforcement in a field full of progressives.

Janey focused on using the power of quasi-incumbency and the historic nature of her acting mayorship, as she’s the first Black person and first woman to serve as the city’s chief executive.

She also went to great lengths to distance herself from the “acting” part of her official title, requiring just “Mayor Kim Janey” be used at City Hall, and as a big part of her branding on the campaign trail.

She will remain acting mayor until the votes are certified in the November election.

Campbell went a couple of different routes, focusing on the lived experiences of her very difficult upbringing and staking herself out as the candidate with views closest to the “defund the police” movement on law enforcement funding.

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New York’s Philharmonic is Back, but Change Is Still Underway

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New York’s Philharmonic is Back, but Change Is Still Underway
Musicians perform during the New York Philharmonic’s concert on September 17, 2021. KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images

After a 556 day, coronavirus-induced hiatus from conventional concerts, New York’s Philharmonic returned last Friday for its return performance in the midst of drama surrounding the performance group. Jaap van Zweden, the Philharmonic’s music director, announced last week that he’ll be stepping down at the conclusion of the 2023-2024 season. Additionally, the Philharmonic’s David Geffen Hall is currently closed for renovations, and will once again be available to be visited in 2022. Overall, it’s been a period of intense upheaval for the iconic orchestra, which happens to hold the distinction of being America’s oldest.

In the past, the New York Times writes, van Zweden sometimes staged performances in which he made questionable decisions with the material; nevertheless, the director is prepared to steward the orchestra through his last season with aplomb. Plus, the feeling of being back out in front of a live audience was thrilling for the performers who’d been denied such an experience for so long.

“That kind of feeling, when we walk out and see a full audience, it’s very inspirational to us because we want to share the music with as many people as possible,” Frank Huang, the Philharmonic’s first violinist, told NY1. Huang acknowledged that many musicians onstage will now be wearing masks, but that “the familiarity of being on stage and performing for an audience, it is going to be there. You know, we feel very comfortable playing together as a group.”

Similar changes have been put in place for both performers and attendees of Broadway shows, which recently made their triumphant comeback after being teased for months by New York’s leaders. Proof of vaccination is required for Broadway audiences and stars alike, and children under the age of 12 wishing to attend a show are required to offer negative coronavirus tests.

New York’s Philharmonic is Back, but Change Is Still Underway

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Houston officer dead, another wounded while serving warrant

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Houston officer dead, another wounded while serving warrant

HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston police officer was killed and another was wounded Monday morning during a shooting that also killed a 31-year-old man whom the officers were attempting to arrest on drug charges, authorities said.

The veteran officers were each shot multiple times while attempting to serve an arrest warrant at an apartment complex on the city’s northeast side, Mayor Sylvester Turner said during a news conference.

“This has been a tragic day today,” Turner said. “It is another reminder that police work is inherently dangerous.”

Senior Officer William Jeffrey, who joined the Houston Police Department in 1990, was pronounced dead at a hospital following the shooting, authorities said. He was 54. Sgt. Charles Vance, who joined the department in 1998, was in stable condition, according to police Chief Troy Finner. Vance is 49.

The officers arrived at the apartment around 7:30 a.m., knocked on the door and spoke with a woman who answered it, Finner said. He said the man then came out and began shooting at the officers.

“You’ve got a suspect with a female girlfriend with small kids in that apartment complex and he still fired upon our officers,” Finner said. He said police returned fire and that the man died on the scene.

Authorities didn’t identify the man the officers were attempting to arrest. The Harris County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the shooting.

___

This story has been corrected to show that Vance joined the department in 1998.

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Gophers in the NFL: Maxx Williams, De’Vondre Campbell stand out in Week 2

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Gophers in the NFL: Maxx Williams, De’Vondre Campbell stand out in Week 2

Before Sunday, Maxx Williams’ most productive day in the NFL came during his rookie season in 2015.

The former Gophers tight end from Waconia had career highs of seven receptions for 94 yards in the Arizona Cardinals’ 34-33 win over the Vikings at State Farm Stadium on Sunday. The seventh-year veteran’s previous bests were six receptions for 53 yards for the Ravens six years ago.

RELATED: Maxx Williams got ‘bragging rights’ in Arizona’s win over his home state Vikings

De’Vondre Campbell, one of Williams’ teammates on the Gophers in 2013-14, had his own big game for the Packers on Monday Night Football. He had 13 total tackles and an interceptions in the 35-17 win over the Lions. It was the fourth time Campbell has eclipsed 10-plus tackles in a game across his six-year career; his best tackle total was 17 for the Falcons two years ago.

His fourth-quarter interception was the Packers’ first pick of the season; it helped seal the NFC North win to put Green Bay (1-1) first in the division.

Four other former Gophers registered tackles this week: Jaguars’ Damien Wilson (six); Texans Eric Murray (five); Bucanneers’ Antoine Winfield Jr. (four); Washington’s Benjamin St-Juste (three). Giants’ Carter Coughlin played nearly 30 defensive snaps Sunday, but didn’t record a stat for a second-straight week.

Buccaneers wideout Tyler Johnson had his first reception of 2021, a five-yard grab against the Falcons. He played on three offensive plays in the season opener and had 17 snaps in Week 2.

Kicker Ryan Santoso was released by the Panthers after making his first NFL points in Week 1. He was picked up by the Titans for it’s practice squad, but was then waived Sunday.

Nine other former Gophers players were inactive, injured or on practice squads for Week 2.

After being cut by the Panthers in preseason, ex-U linebacker Jon Celestin is now coaching at Eden Prairie.

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Jersey City police catch baby thrown from balcony

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Jersey City police catch baby thrown from balcony

Jersey City Police Officer Eduardo Matute holds a baby he saved after the infant was thrown from a balcony on Sept. 18, 2021, officials said. (Credit: Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office)

JERSEY CITY, N.J. (PIX11) — Jersey City police officers were hailed as heroes this weekend after they quickly sprung into action to catch a 1-month-old baby who was thrown from a balcony.

Officer Eduardo Matute was among several officers who responded to the scene on Saturday after someone called police and reported a child was in danger, according to officials. Upon arrival, they encountered a man who was dangling the baby from a second-story balcony and threatening to drop the infant, officials said.

Police set up a perimeter and several officers positioned themselves below the balcony as the man continued to threaten to throw the baby over the railing, according to officials. After a lengthy standoff, officials said the man dropped the infant, and Matute and other officers caught the child.

The baby was taken to a hospital for evaluation but was unharmed, according to officials. The man was arrested and faces charges.

Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop praised the officers on social media Saturday evening. “We are lucky to have the men and woman of the JCPD, as every single day I see it firsthand they rise to meet any/all challenges,” he wrote in a Facebook post.

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Illinois schools, hospitals begin vaccine mandate with Covid-19 testing option

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Illinois schools, hospitals begin vaccine mandate with Covid-19 testing option

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (NEXSTAR) — A new state vaccine mandate is now in place for hundreds of thousands of teachers, nurses, and other medical professionals in Illinois. Staff at schools, hospitals, and clinics will now have to show proof they’ve been vaccinated or submit to weekly Coronavirus testing after a new statewide requirement went into effect on Sunday.

The Pritzker administration delayed the initial vaccine mandate to buy enough time to negotiate a testing option with schools and hospitals. Most school districts are now offering rapid saliva tests from the University of Illinois’ SHIELD testing system. Some others are using PCR or antigen tests from a provider named Achieve. Both programs use federal funding to pay for the tests, which are available at no cost to teachers in many school districts. Hospitals report using a wide variety of tests.

“It was hard for some of them to implement that,” Governor Pritzker said at a press conference in Peoria on Monday. “Particularly the healthcare institutions, interestingly, because of not having enough personnel.”

While most teachers and nurses are already vaccinated, administrators at school districts and hospitals are now bracing for tough conversations with some of their unvaccinated employees who may refuse to submit to testing. A small group of protesters, including some health care workers, rallied outside the state Capitol on Saturday to voice opposition to the vaccine mandate. Since unvaccinated workers have a week to show their employers a negative Coronavirus test, the first hard deadline will come at the end of this week.

“If they do not test or provide the beginning of their vaccination, then we can we cannot let them then work in the school building after this week,” Springfield’s District 186 superintendent Jennifer Gill said.

Worker shortages have plagued the the education and health care sectors since long before the pandemic began. Now employers are concerned they may lose some ground in filling open positions if the mandate forces some workers off the job.

“My primary job in an education system is to educate our students, and we are also in the middle of a very deep and important employee shortage that we have across the state,” Gill said. “It’s not just the teacher shortage. It’s paraprofessional shortage, it’s bus driver shortage, it’s all of the above. And operating a district to educate students is my primary goal. And that is something that we have to keep in mind.”

“Of course, I’m concerned about people who will refuse to get vaccinated and refused to get tested,” Governor Pritzker responded when asked about the potential for the vaccine mandate exacerbating staffing shortages. “We don’t want to cause any shortages, but we do want to keep everybody safe,” he said. “We do have these alternatives available to people. But again, vaccination is the safest thing that people can do for themselves for their communities for the schools, as well as healthcare groups for their health care.”

Vaccine mandates have caused unintended consequences in other areas. A hospital in New York recently had to suspend services in the birthing unit after several nurses resigned in protest to a vaccine mandate.

The Illinois Health Care Right of Conscience Act does provide civil protections for patients who decide to refuse vaccines or medical tests. Gill says the new state vaccine mandate policy allows teachers to decline the vaccine for medical or religious objections, but she cited new emergency rules from the Illinois State Board of Education, and said that a religious exemption “does not apply to testing.”

A spokeswoman for the State Board of Education said any school district that does not enforce the vaccine mandate “risks state recognition,” which could result in a school district losing state funding.

“ISBE will investigate all complaints of noncompliance,” spokeswoman Jackie Matthews said in an email. “School districts will maintain records at the local level to ensure the compliance of all school personnel.”

School districts have to identify personnel in three categories: “fully vaccinated, unvaccinated workers in compliance with testing requirements, or excluded from school premises.”

The Pritzker administration expects legal challenges to the vaccine mandate.

“I know that there are people who are attempting to challenge these things in court,” Pritzker said. “I would just say that this is a very unhelpful thing to do, and it is going to make schools and healthcare settings less safe.”

Most teachers and students who are old enough to be vaccinated have already had their shots. Gill said 72.3% of teachers in Springfield schools are fully vaccinated, while 20% have not yet responded to the district’s questions, and 6.4% say they will refuse the vaccine despite the mandate.

More than a year-and-a-half into the pandemic, the virus is still spreading so quickly through unvaccinated populations that it’s putting severe strain on health care systems, especially in Central and Southern Illinois.

Region Five, which consists of 20 of the state’s southern-most counties, has no ICU hospital beds left available, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. St. Anthony’s hospital in Effingham set a pandemic record with 24 patients hospitalized with Covid-related illness last week. All but two of them were unvaccinated.

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Odds you’ll run into someone contagious with COVID in Colorado are at their highest point this year

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Odds you’ll run into someone contagious with COVID in Colorado are at their highest point this year

The odds that a Colorado resident will run across someone who’s contagious with COVID-19 in any large group are now higher than they’ve been since the start of 2021 — though how much people should worry about that depends on whether they’ve been vaccinated.

With the state now experiencing its fifth wave of the virus, about one in every 99 people was estimated to be contagious as of last Wednesday, according to a new report from the Colorado School of Public Health’s COVID-19 modeling team. During the fall surge last year, about one in every 40 people was contagious.

When so many people are contagious, it means that interactions will remain relatively risky, even if cases start to go down, said Beth Carlton, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the School of Public Health. Getting vaccinated, wearing masks and avoiding high-risk activities will help speed up the return to the relative freedom we had in the early summer, but “it takes a while,” she said.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s COVID-19 data paints a mixed picture of whether the situation is improving. But what is clear is that unvaccinated people remain highly vulnerable, Carlton said. The state reported about 83% of those who are hospitalized now aren’t fully vaccinated.

New cases were down for a second week, with 11,561 reported in the week ending Sunday. But the percentage of tests coming back positive was up, reaching 6.58% over the last three days. That suggests the state might not have a complete picture of how widely the virus is spreading.

So far, Colorado has been spared the large increase in seriously ill children that some states have endured, though about 26% of new coronavirus cases are in people younger than 20.

Hospitalizations also were difficult to interpret. As of Monday afternoon, 980 people were hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. That’s an improvement over the previous Monday, but a worsening compared to Saturday and Sunday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone wear masks in indoor public places when their community has 50 or more cases for every 100,000 people. Only three Colorado counties have case rates lower than that: San Juan, Hinsdale and Lake. More than 10% of tests in Lake County were positive, though, suggesting the virus is spreading more widely than the case numbers show, and residents might want to mask up.

It appears that the rapid increase in cases and hospitalizations Colorado saw in August has slowed down, but it’s not clear if a decrease is starting, Carlton said.

“I think we’re at a very uncertain moment,” she said. “We’re seeing these kind of wild swings in the data.”

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Electrical workers charged up for Annissa Essaibi-George

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Electrical workers charged up for Annissa Essaibi-George

Annissa Essaibi-George has connected with another union in her bid for mayor.

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 103 endorsed her Monday at the union’s office on Freeport Street in Dorchester. IBEW Local 103’s membership includes 10,000 highly skilled electricians and technicians in the Boston area.

“IBEW Local 103 is incredibly proud to stand with Annissa Essaibi-George in her candidacy for Mayor of Boston,” said Lou Antonellis, Business Manager for IBEW Local 103. “As a former union member herself, Annissa knows our values firsthand. She will advocate and fight for us every single day as our Mayor, and will always govern with Boston’s hard working residents and families in mind.”

Essaibi-George said she will “work hand in hand with our unions to fight for fair wages, increase benefits, and maintain safe working conditions for all. Labor will always have a seat at the policymaking table in order for us to do this work, together.”

Michelle Wu, the other finalist for mayor of Boston, has also lined up a few key endorsements — Suffolk Sheriff Steven Tompkins, to name a big one — as the Nov. 2 final looms.

Jamaica Plain State Sen. and gubernatorial hopeful Sonia Chang-Díaz also endorsed Wu during a rally in the South End on Saturday.

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J&J: Booster dose of its COVID shot prompts strong response

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J&J: Booster dose of its COVID shot prompts strong response

LONDON — Johnson & Johnson released data showing that a booster dose to its one-shot coronavirus vaccine provides a strong immune response months after people receive a first dose.

J&J said in statement Tuesday that it ran two early studies in people previously given its vaccine and found that a second dose produced an increased antibody response in adults from age 18 to 55. The study’s results haven’t yet been peer-reviewed.

“A booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine further increases antibody responses among study participants who had previously received our vaccine,” said Dr. Mathai Mammen, global head of research and development at J&J. The company previously published data showing its one-shot dose provided protection for up to eight months after immunization.

J&J said it is now in talks with regulators including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency and others regarding using booster doses of its vaccine.

J&J’s vaccine is approved for use in the U.S., across Europe and there are plans for at least 200 million doses to be shared with the U.N.-backed COVAX effort aimed at distributing vaccines to poor countries. But the company has been plagued by production problems and millions of doses made at a troubled factory in Baltimore had to be thrown out.

The J&J vaccine has been considered critical by numerous health officials to ending the pandemic because it requires only one shot, but fears about the easier-to-spread delta coronavirus variant have prompted numerous governments to consider the use of booster shots for many approved vaccines.

Last week, experts at the FDA recommended people 65 and older get a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine made by Pfizer-BioNTech while Britain previously authorized booster shots for people 50 and over in addition to priority groups like health workers and those with underlying health conditions. Other countries including Israel, France and Germany have also begun offering third vaccine doses to some people.

The World Health Organization has urged rich countries to stop administering booster doses until at least the end of the year, saying vaccines should immediately be redirected to Africa, where fewer than 4% of the population is fully immunized. In a paper published last week in the journal Lancet, top scientists from the WHO and FDA argued that the average person doesn’t need a booster shot and that the authorized vaccines to date provide strong protection against severe COVID-19, hospitalization and death.

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Police charge Albany man in connection with May shooting incident

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Police charge Albany man in connection with May shooting incident

WASHINGTON COUNTY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Tuesday, September 21 Washington County reported their daily COVID update.

For Monday, September 20 case activity, 18 new COVID cases were added/processed, there were 24 new recoveries of active cases, nine current cases are hospitalized. 12 of the 18 new cases with ties to other cases/investigations (including household spread cases, workplace spread, and other school and/or community activities) and the remaining six cases have no identified origin of exposure at this time. Of the Tuesday, September 21 new cases were added, six have been fully vaccinated (five received the Pfizer series, one received the Moderna series).

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Where is Brian Laundrie? Timeline of FBI search for Gabby Petito’s boyfriend

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Where is Brian Laundrie? Timeline of FBI search for Gabby Petito’s boyfriend

(NEXSTAR) – The search is still on for Brian Laundrie, a person of interest in the disappearance and death of his girlfriend, 22-year-old Gabby Petito.

Petito had been traveling around the country with Laundrie, 23, documenting the road trip on Instagram and YouTube. Remains fitting her description were found in Wyoming Monday.

So while the search for Petito has ended, Laundrie is now the one who has disappeared. Here’s what we know about where he was last seen, where he might be now.

Sept. 1: Laundrie returns home

Police say Laundrie returns to his parents’ home in North Port, Florida on Sept. 1 with the white van the couple had been traveling in. The van was registered in Petito’s name.

Sept. 11: Petito reported missing

After Petito’s family hadn’t heard from her since August, they report her missing. At this point, Laundrie was not named a person of interest or taken into custody.

Sept. 14: Petito’s family begs Laundrie to help, search warrant executed for the van

Petito’s family releases a statement asking Laundrie to cooperate with the investigation and help find their daughter, saying, “the one person that can help find Gabby refuses to help.”

An attorney for Laundrie’s family releases a statement saying he would be “remaining in the background at this juncture and will have no further comment.”

“It is our hope that the search for Miss Petito is successful and that Miss Petito is reunited with her family,” reads the statement from his family.

Petito’s van is towed away from Laundrie’s parents’ house to be processed as evidence. Police find an external hard drive inside.

Sept. 15: Laundrie named person of interest

Police name Laundrie a person of interest, but not a suspect, in Petito’s disappearance.

Police say Laundrie “has not made himself available to be interviewed by investigators” and hasn’t “provided any helpful details.”

They request a warrant to search the hard drive found in Petito’s van.

Sept. 16: Investigation continues

North Port Police hold a press conference asking for the public’s help finding Petito. The police chief says he knows Laundrie’s whereabouts, but is frustrated he isn’t being more helpful.

“Two people went on a trip. One person returned. And that person that returned isn’t providing us any information,” says Chief Todd Garrison.

Sept. 17: Laundrie goes missing

Police and the FBI enter the Laundries’ home and search the property. Brian’s parents say they haven’t seen their son since Tuesday, Sept. 14.

Law enforcement announce they’re now searching for two missing people: Petito and Laundrie.

Sept. 18: Search for Laundrie begins

More than 50 North Port police officers, FBI agents and members of other law enforcement agencies search the 24,000-acre Carlton Reserve in Sarasota, Florida. They start the search there because his family says it’s where he went earlier in the week with just a backpack.

Authorities use drones, scent-sniffing dogs and all-terrain vehicles in the reserve, which has more than 100 miles of trails, as well as campgrounds. Investigators took some of his clothing from his parents’ home Friday night to provide a scent for the search dogs.

Sept. 19: Petito is found, Laundrie still missing

The FBI says remains matching the description of Gabby Petito are found in Wyoming. Meanwhile, the search for Laundrie in Florida continues.

Sept. 20: FBI, police search Laundrie’s home for hours

Law enforcement announces they are no longer searching the Carlton Reserve for Laundrie. Instead, FBI agents and North Port police begin searching the Laundrie home, tape it off and start collecting evidence.

WFLA reporters on scene see FBI agents carry suitcases and documents into the home and photograph a shed on the property.

A few hours later, a tow truck arrives and tows away a Ford Mustang.

The search of the Laundrie home lasts about eight hours.

What comes next?

While officers have stopped searching the wildlife reserve, the search for Laundrie continues. An attorney for the Laundrie family originally planned a press conference for Tuesday afternoon in New York, but later canceled it at the FBI’s request.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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