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St. Louis County man on Food Network’s ‘Chopped’ tonight

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St. Louis County man on Food Network’s ‘Chopped’ tonight

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – A Maryland Heights man will compete on an episode of Chopped tonight on the Food Network. Nico Shumpert graduated in 2007 from the Pattonville School District. Administrators are big fans and want you to know that the show airs at 8:00 pm in the Central timezone.

Shumpert visited Pattonville High School in 2018 to give a cooking demonstration. The school calls him a private chef and culinary influencer. The pictures attached to this article are from the visit to culinary arts students in Tracie Olson’s class.

Nico Shumpert posted this Facebook status update Monday:

“It’s going down tomorrow!! Tune in to @foodnetwork #Chopped at 9pm ET/PT and watch me go head to head with these amazing chefs! I’ve always wanted to compete on #Chopped so this was definitely one for the books.”

This statement is from an August Facebook post:

“I’m super excited to share that I competed on Food Network “Chopped” earlier this year. My episode will air Tuesday, September 14th at 9pm ET/PT. I’ve always been a huge fan of the show and now after actually competing, I can honestly say I have a new respect for each and every person who’s ever competed. It was intense but so much fun! Can’t wait for y’all to see how it went down. S/o to crew and everybody at Food Network who helped make this happen. ✊🏽🤙🏽”

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1 new death and 53 new cases in Albany’s September 27 COVID report

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102 new positive cases Albany County’s Sept. 17 COVID report

Posted: Updated:

Albany County

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Albany County Executive Daniel P. McCoy provided the latest report on the county’s progress on vaccinations and controlling the spread of the Coronavirus. 

As of September, 26, 71.3% of all Albany County residents have received at least the first dose of the vaccine, and 65.4% have been fully vaccinated. The first dose vaccination rate for the county’s 18+ population is now up to 82.3%.  

County Executive McCoy announced that the total number of confirmed cases of COVID in Albany County is now at 28,547 to date, with 53 new positive cases identified since September, 26. The county’s five-day average of new daily positive cases is now down to 82.6. Albany County’s most recent seven-day average of percent positive rates is now 3.8% and the Capital Region’s average rate is 3.7%.

Among the new daily cases of COVID identified in the county, 10 had close contacts to positive cases, 39 did not have clear sources of infection at this time, one had traveled out of state and three are healthcare workers or residents of congregate living settings.

There are now 505 active cases in the county, down from 540 yesterday. The number of people under mandatory quarantine decreased to 879 from 891. So far 89,543 people have completed quarantine to date. Of those who completed quarantine, 28,042 of them had tested positive and recovered – an increase of 83 additional recoveries.

The County Executive reported that there was one new hospitalization since September, 26, and 32 county residents are still hospitalized with the virus – a net decrease of three. There are now six patients in ICU’s. Sadly there is one new COVID death to report – a person in their 70’s. The death toll for Albany County stands at 402 since the outbreak began.

“Unfortunately, we have lost another Albany County resident to COVID-19 and I send my condolences to yet another family who has lost a loved one to the virus,” said County Executive McCoy. “Our new daily positive cases have gone down for a third day in a row and the number of new hospitalizations and those in the hospital are also seeing decreases. We need to remain vigilant and encourage those who are not vaccinated to get a shot.”

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Gov. Hochul: National Guard to help with potential hospital staffing shortages

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Gov. Hochul: National Guard to help with potential hospital staffing shortages

BRONX, N.Y. (WROC) — Gov. Kathy Hochul helped launch a community COVID-19 booster vaccination site in New York City Monday morning, where she also spoke about the state’s vaccine mandate for health care workers statewide; a mandate that went into effect Monday.

Booster shots

The governor announced this weekend that New York state has enough booster shots available to cover all of those who currently qualify. She said the state has endorsed the CDC recommendations on booster shots for at-risk New Yorkers.

The state has launched a “robust Implementation and outreach plan to ensure the availability and accessibility of booster doses statewide.” Additionally, there’s a new state website dedicated to booster shot information and resources.

“Our top priority remains staying ahead of this constantly changing virus and protecting New Yorkers with effective, long-lasting vaccines,” said Gov. Kathy Hochul. “As we’ve heard from our federal and State medical and health experts, as with many other vaccines, the protection from the COVID-19 vaccine can wane over time. A booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine will help particularly at-risk New Yorkers stay protected from the virus for longer. While the focus of our vaccination effort remains ensuring all unvaccinated New Yorkers get vaccinated, those who are booster eligible should waste no time receiving maximum protection from COVID-19 as soon as possible.”

According to officials from the governor’s office:

New Yorkers who received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine should receive their booster dose at least six months after their primary vaccine series IF:

  • They are 65 years and older or residents in long-term care settings.
  • They are 50-64 years of age with underlying medical conditions. 

New Yorkers who received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine may receive their COVID-19 booster dose at least six months after their primary vaccine series IF:

  • They are18-49 years with underlying medical conditions, based on your individual benefits and risks.
  • They are 18-64 years and are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of your occupational or institutional setting, based on your individual benefits and risks. 

CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky endorsed a CDC advisory committee’s recommendation to allow older or otherwise vulnerable Americans to get the Pfizer booster. The CDC has not yet endorsed Moderna or Johnson & Johnson boosters. According to CDC reccomendations:

“People 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series.

People aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine atleast 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series.

People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks.

People aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks.”

“Getting New Yorkers vaccinated still remains our top priority as we work to stop the spread of COVID,” Gov. Hochul said.

If you’re eligible and would like to get the booster, you can book an appointment through the NYS’s website, here.

Health care vaccine mandate

The deadline for hospital and nursing home workers in New York state to be vaccinated against COVID-19 arrived Monday with the prospect of severe staff shortages fueled by workers getting suspended or fired for refusing to be inoculated.

With thousands of workers still thought to be holding out, hospital administrators prepared contingency plans that included cutting back on noncritical services and limiting admissions at nursing homes.

Gov. Hochul said this weekend she was prepared to call in medically trained National Guard members and retirees, or vaccinated workers from outside the state, to fill any gaps. The governor reiterated that sentiment during Monday morning’s press conference, adding that she would sign an executive order to authorize the National Guard resources should they be nedded.

The governor has held firm on the mandate in the face of pleas to delay it and multiple lawsuits challenging its constitutionality.

All health care workers in New York state at hospitals and nursing homes are required to be vaccinated with at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by Monday. Employees who refuse the shots face suspensions and termination.

The rules apply not just to people like doctors and nurses, but also to others who work in health care institutions, like food service workers, administrators and cleaners.

The mandate comes as hospitals are already reeling from staff shortages fueled in part by workers retiring and employees seeking other jobs after 18 months of the pandemic.

Health care workers can apply for a religious exemption, at least for now. A federal judge on Oct. 12 will consider a legal challenge arguing that such exemptions are constitutionally required.


Check back with News 8 WROC as we will continue to update this developing story.

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$6M awarded to local schools to expand internet access

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$6M awarded to local schools to expand internet access

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Congressman Paul Tonko has announced that nearly 20 schools in the Capital Region will be receiving over $6 million to help expand and improve internet access for students and teachers. The funding is part of the American Rescue Plan to help schools and libraries update services for remote learning during the pandemic.

“Throughout this COVID-19 crisis we have heard about the hardships millions of Americans are facing without access to broadband,” said Tonko. “We have heard from students unable to connect to their classes and submit assignments, and from educators who have to drive to parking lots with public Wi-Fi and teach from their cars.”

The funding is available for the purchase of laptops, tablets, Wi-Fi hotspots, modems, routers, and broadband connections for off-campus use by students, school staff, and library patrons in need.

This is the first round of funding from the Emergency Connectivity Fund Program established under the American Rescue More than $1.2 billion will go to schools and libraries across the United States during this first round.

The schools in the Capital Region receiving funding include:

  • Albany City School District, Albany, $1,329,750
  • Schenectady City School District, Schenectady, $1,382,500
  • Amsterdam City School District, Amsterdam, $740,000
  • Shenendehowa Central School District, Clifton Park, $342,764
  • North Colonie Central School District, Latham, $94,707
  • Rensselaer City School District, Rensselaer, $41,908
  • Watervliet City School District, Watervliet, $241,240
  • Menands Union Free School District, Menands, $86,800
  • Albany Public Library, Albany, $59,144
  • Scotia-Glenville Central School District, Scotia, $299,424
  • Mohonasen Central School District, Schenectady, $449,314
  • St. Anne Institute, Albany, $6,792
  • Brighter Choice Charter for Girls, Albany, $146,589
  • Henry Johnson Charter School, Albany, $46,560
  • Commission on Economic Opportunity Administrative Offices, Troy, $3,955
  • Green Tech High School, Albany, $238,540
  • Albany Leadership Charter School, Albany, $166,000
  • Kipp Albany Community Charter School District, Albany, $340,000

Applications for a second round of funding will open September 28 and close October 13 and will provide funding for eligible equipment and services received or delivered between July 1, 2021 and June 30, 2022.

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John Hinckley, who shot Reagan, to be freed from oversight

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John Hinckley, who shot Reagan, to be freed from oversight

By BEN FINLEY

A federal judge said Monday that John Hinckley Jr., who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan four decades ago, can be freed from all remaining restrictions next year if he continues to follow those rules and remains mentally stable.

U.S. District Court Judge Paul L. Friedman in Washington said during a 90-minute court hearing that he’ll issue his ruling on the plan this week.

Since Hinckley moved to Williamsburg, Virginia, from a Washington hospital in 2016, court-imposed restrictions have required doctors and therapists to oversee his psychiatric medication and therapy. Hinckley has been barred from having a gun. And he can’t contact Reagan’s children, other victims or their families, or actress Jodie Foster, who he was obsessed with at the time of the 1981 shooting.

Friedman said that Hinckley, now 66, has displayed no symptoms of active mental illness, no violent behavior and no interest in weapons since 1983.

“If he hadn’t tried to kill the president, he would have been unconditionally released a long, long, long time ago,” the judge said. “But everybody is comfortable now after all of the studies, all of the analysis and all of the interviews and all of the experience with Mr. Hinckley.”

Friedman said the plan is to release Hinckley from all court supervision in June if all goes well.

A 2020 violence risk assessment conducted on behalf of Washington’s Department of Behavioral Health concluded that Hinckley would not pose a danger if he’s unconditionally released from the court-ordered restrictions.

The U.S. government had previously opposed ending restrictions. But it took a different position Monday, with attorneys saying they would agree to unconditional release if Hinckley follows the rules and shows mental stability for the next nine months.

Kacie Weston, an attorney for the U.S. government, said that it wants to make sure Hinckley can adapt well to living on his own after his mother died in July. Another concern is the impending retirement of one of his therapists and the looming end to a therapy group, which has provided a lot of support and social interaction for Hinckley.

Hinckley was 25 when he shot and wounded the 40th U.S. president outside a Washington hotel. The shooting paralyzed Reagan press secretary James Brady, who died in 2014. It also injured Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy and Washington police officer Thomas Delahanty.

Jurors decided Hinckley was suffering from acute psychosis and found him not guilty by reason of insanity, saying he needed treatment and not life in prison.

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Troy man charged for allegedly possessing handgun

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Rochester man charged in hatchet murder back in custody after ‘Less is More’ release

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – According to the United States Attorney Antoinette and Special Agent in Charge of the Albany Field Office of the FBI. Justin Smith, 21, of Troy, was ordered detained on Friday, September 24 while he awaits his trial on unlawful possession of a firearm as a felon charge.

Smith, a felon, allegedly possessed a handgun in Troy on or about March 5.

The charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, a fine of up to $250,000, and a term of post-imprisonment supervised release of up to 3 years.  

This case is being investigated by the FBI and the Troy Police Department, and is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Dustin Segovia. 

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  • President Biden to get COVID-19 booster shot Monday
  • Dunkin’ donates 300 pounds of coffee to Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York ahead of National Coffee Day
  • Pfizer testing COVID-prevention pill
  • Fall fun! Nine Pin Cider and Samascott Orchards to host popular cider events

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What are the odds of winning Monday’s $545 million Powerball drawing?

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What are the odds of winning Monday’s $545 million Powerball drawing?

ST. LOUIS (KTVI) — You have a chance to become a multi-millionaire Monday night when a near-record Powerball jackpot goes up for grabs.

Monday night’s drawing is worth an estimated $545 million. If the winner chooses the upfront cash payout, they will receive $392 million. The drawing will be done at 10:59 p.m.

The odds of winning the jackpot are 1 in 292.2 million.

Here are five things more likely to happen:

  1. Being killed by hornets, wasps or bees. The odds are 1 in 59,507.
  2. Becoming president of the United States. Those odds are about 1 in 1 million.
  3. Becoming a movie star. The odds are 1 in 110,501.
  4. Going to the emergency room with a pogo stick-related injury. Those odds are about 1 in 115,300, according to Deseret News.
  5. Having conjoined twins. The odds of birthing conjoined twins are about 1 in 200,000, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

If hit, the jackpot would be the 10th-largest in the game’s history.

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  • Dunkin’ donates 300 pounds of coffee to Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York ahead of National Coffee Day
  • Pfizer testing COVID-prevention pill
  • Fall fun! Nine Pin Cider and Samascott Orchards to host popular cider events
  • 13-year-old girl missing in New York believed to be suicidal

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Broncos Fifth Quarter: Pass rush gets cranked up (five sacks) against Jets

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Broncos Fifth Quarter: Pass rush gets cranked up (five sacks) against Jets

Upon Further Review

1. Pass rush cranks up. After a non-descript start to the season, the Broncos’ pass rush got going against the New York Jets. The Broncos had 11 total disruptions (three sacks, five knockdowns and three pressures) in Weeks 1-2, but a whopping 16 against the Jets (five sacks, four knockdowns and seven pressures) of Jets QB Zach Wilson. The sacks came in 2.75 (ILB Alexander Johnson), 4.82 (DE Shelby Harris), 3.26 (OLB Von Miller), 3.95 (OLB Malik Reed) and 3.03 seconds (Johnson). The Broncos rushed at least five players at Wilson on 10 of his 40 drop-backs (25%) and he was 4 of 10 for 37 yards against extra rushers.

2. Stretching the field. Broncos QB Teddy Bridgewater was 4-of-8 passing on attempts that traveled at least 16 “air” yards, but those completions accounted for 110 of his 235 yards. The plays were 28 yards to WR KJ Hamler and 27, 24 and 31 yards to WR Tim Patrick. A downfield attempt negated by penalty was WR Courtland Sutton drawing a 19-yard pass interference penalty on Jets CB Brandin Echols on third-and-10; RB Melvin Gordon scored on the next play.

3. Moving Miller around. Minus OLB Bradley Chubb (ankle surgery), the Broncos shuttled Miller on at least five snaps to go against LT George Fant. Another cool wrinkle by coach Vic Fangio was using Johnson as a defensive end (three-point stance) for a third-and-1 play in the first half. Johnson was a part of the pass rush on the play that gained six yards.

4. Penalty script flipped. The Broncos flipped their penalty script, from defense in Week 2 to offense in Week 3. The offense had only two penalties in the first two games, but was called for six against the Jets — two on TE Noah Fant and one apiece on LG Dalton Risner, RG Graham Glasgow, Sutton and Bridgewater. Risner’s penalty was for taunting S Marcus Maye after Gordon’s touchdown. Risner told Fangio he didn’t do anything, but replays clearly showed him jawing toward Maye instead of, you know, celebrating with Gordon and Co., in the end zone. The defense had no penalties.

5. Few big rushes. Fangio wasn’t exaggerating when he said the Jets’ defense sold out to stop the run. The Broncos had 37 carries for 121 yards, but didn’t have an attempt of longer than 14 yards. We booked the Broncos with 10 “bad” run plays (gain of one or fewer yards) and 3 1/2 went to unblocked players. Risner and C Lloyd Cushenberry had 1 1/2 apiece and RT Bobby Massie one.

6. Strnad’s debut. ILB Justin Strnad made his first NFL start in place of Josey Jewell (season-ending chest injury). Strnad played 41 snaps and made four tackles. In man coverage, he allowed two completions for eight yards in four targets.

Four Key Numbers

3,288 — Consecutive snaps streak for safety Justin Simmons, dating back to Week 1 of 2018, that ended Sunday.

+50 — Point differential for Broncos in Weeks 1-3, tied with Buffalo for best in NFL.

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Ballston Spa National Bank hosting drive-thru food pantry

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Ballston Spa National Bank hosting drive-thru food pantry

BALLSTON SPA, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Ballston Spa National Bank (BSNB) is teaming up with the Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York to host its 16th contactless drive-thru food pantry. The event is September 28 at 9 a.m. at 990 Route 67 in Ballston Spa.

The pantry is open to families and individuals in need of food assistance. Food is on a first-come, first-served basis while supplies last.

BSNB says an anticipated 18,000 pounds of food will be distributed during the event. Items include produce, dairy, frozen meats and non-perishable items. Since spring 2020, BSNB food pantries have distributed 270,000 pounds of food to people in need.

BSNB has also received donations from the community totaling $34,000. With the money raised from the bank, the Regional Food Bank has received more than $109,000 to combat food insecurity.

The bank is matching new community donations up to $5,000 through September 28.

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The Two Degree Difference: Warming fall temperatures

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The Two Degree Difference: Warming fall temperatures

Break out the sweaters, boots and pumpkin spice because fall is here! And while we will still get to enjoy all that fall has to offer in our region, the fall season has seen some major changes over the last few decades, all because of climate change.

Across the country, the most drastic changes regarding fall season warming can be felt in the western United States and the northeast. Some locations have seen multiple degrees of warming since 1970.

In Burlington, the average fall temperature has climbed by about four degrees in the last 50 years according to Climate Central. Along with an average of 18 more days above normal.

Fall warming can have many impacts including an extended mosquito and tick season, pollen allergies and worsening air pollution.

For the northeast, this can impact the fall foliage we have grown to know and love.

“We have had summer like weather linger into early fall, that tends to make it more of a gradual development” said Michael Snyder, the commissioner for Vermont Forests, Parks and Recreations.

Warmer temperatures are known to delay the foliage season and higher than average rainfall totals can act top keep leaves healthy and green for longer.

“All factors are in place right now and if we have that classic fall weather, bright sunny crisp days, cold night and a little bit of moisture that is when you see it go up to that next level of vibrancy throughout the state.” said Snyder.

For more on how climate change is impacting fall foliage, you can head here.

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Video of NYC sanitation workers tossing produce from street vendor sparks outrage

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Video of NYC sanitation workers tossing produce from street vendor sparks outrage

NEW YORK (WPIX) – New York City’s Sanitation Department came under fire after videos showed workers throwing away fresh produce from an unlicensed street vendor.

The videos, posted by the Street Vendor Project on Saturday morning, showed at least two workers tossing individual fruits and vegetables as well as crates of produce into the back of a garbage truck.

The organization, which advocates for street vendors in New York City, alleged that thousands of dollars in fresh produce were trashed.

CONTENT WARNING: The video in the tweet below contains strong language.

An official with one of the involved agencies told WPIX the sanitation workers had no choice but to trash the produce due to New York City regulations and protocol regarding fresh food.

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection was issuing a violation to the unlicensed vendor when they abandoned the items, the official said. The NYPD called in the sanitation workers to dispose of the crates of produce left behind when the vendor failed to return, according to DCWP.

City law states agencies should attempt to donate confiscated fresh food items, however, a Department of Health representative must first certify the food is safe.

The official said the Department of Sanitation had to trash the produce because the chain of custody of the food could not be verified as safe to consume, but the workers were forced to leave after a crowd of angry residents gathered at the scene.

When the workers returned later in the day, most of the food had been removed from the location by unknown individuals, the official said.

The video sparked outrage on social media and quickly went viral. A rally was held Sunday to condemn the city’s actions and call for fewer restrictions on street vendors.

“This video shows a small portion of an unfortunate situation, where abandoned material needed to be disposed of for the safety of the community. The Department of Sanitation is committed to our mission of keeping streets and neighborhoods safe, clean, and healthy,” the spokesperson said.

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection told WPIX it would work with the involved city agencies to ensure this doesn’t happen again.

“The results of this multi-agency vending enforcement are not in line with the city’s policies. DCWP and its sister agencies who assist with confiscations when necessary will work together to ensure this type of wastefulness does not happen again,” the spokesperson said.

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