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‘The Nowhere Inn’ Intentionally Evades the ‘Grotesquely Capitalist Artistic Bullseye’

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‘The Nowhere Inn’ Intentionally Evades the ‘Grotesquely Capitalist Artistic Bullseye’
Annie Clark and Carrie Brownstein in The Nowhere Inn. IFC Films

Carrie Brownstein’s work has always turned our expectations of the world on their head. As a musician, in Sleater-Kinney and Wild Flag, Brownstein has written songs with real meaning, taking on political and social topics other artists avoided. As an actress and writer, Brownstein has perfected the art of satire, first with breakout series Portlandia and now with The Nowhere Inn, a film co-written by Brownstein and St. Vincent’s Annie Clark.

The film, in theaters and on digital September 17th, is deeply unexpected—and one that’s best to go into knowing as little as possible. It’s framed as a documentary about St. Vincent, intercut with musical performances, but The Nowhere Inn becomes a pensive, tongue-in-cheek look at identity and persona. Brownstein plays a version of herself, a filmmaker tasked with making the documentary about St. Vincent interesting, and she and Clark also explore their real-life friendship as the story unfolds.

For Brownstein, who has recently penned a biopic of the band Heart (which she also plans to direct), The Nowhere Inn was a way to explore some significant questions about who we are and how we present ourselves to each other. We spoke with Brownstein about how the film came to be, its inspirations and why she feels art is best created off-center.

Observer: Where did the idea for this film come from?

Brownstein: It started from conversation that Annie and I have had kind of perennially as friends who happen to be in similar creative spheres, about authenticity and relatability and veracity. Also, our genuine affection for music documentaries and what they reveal and what they keep hidden. It stemmed from an ongoing discourse. But as we started to write it we realized that we didn’t want to approach music in a linear way. Part of the magic that draws us to it is indescribable and ineffable. We wanted to capture some of that impossibility and to ask to more questions than we provided answers. And to turn things on their head. It was a process that kept revealing itself to us until we were able to draw a handful of influences and throw out the idea of a straight-up documentary and make something that embraced what we love about film and music.

What were some of those influences?

Things like Persona. Things like The Man Who Fell to Earth. Phantom of the Paradise. Lots of Nicolas Roeg. The movie Privilege. Weird, esoteric movies, I guess.

Had you and Annie written anything together before this?

No. We hadn’t really. As Annie was beginning her Mass Seduction press cycle she had asked me to help her write some little interstitials for fake interview answers. So I remember we sat down in L.A. and spent an afternoon working on that. But our friendship has always entailed certain kinds of collaborative give and take. We sent each other snippets of songs or lyrics or ideas. We have a lot of trust in each other’s feedback and constructive criticism, so it wasn’t at odds with the dynamic we already have.

Would you describe this film as a documentary or is it something else?

It’s completely scripted, so I don’t know. That would be a real mindfuck to be like, “No, this a pure documentary. That’s Annie’s family and this is how we both are.” People would be like, “Whoa, that’s crazy.” That’s a great question because I don’t think I’ve had to describe it to anyone. I always just say, “You have to see it.” I haven’t been tasked with describing it. Someone in an earlier interview said, “This movie has been described as a meta documentary.” I didn’t come up with that, but sure. Maybe it is a meta documentary. I guess it requires some kind of neologism. But it’s just a movie.

One of my favorite ways to see something is with no background. Like when someone recommends a film to me I usually say, “Stop there. Don’t tell me anything about it.” No matter what the genre is. That just allows a submersion without preconceived ideas. You’re always operating in relation to the narrative you had going into it. If somebody tells you “The movie is like this” then your experience is shaped by what you assume you’re going to be watching.

As you were considering the concept of identity, did you come up with any sort of answer as to why we’re so obsessed with the rock star persona?

I don’t feel like we were seeking answers as much as we were aiming to explore and ask questions and enjoy the 360-degree trip of exploration and discovery. If anything, I’m more interested in maintaining mystery than I am in unraveling it.

What was the main question you wanted to pose?

For a practical and almost personal level we were thinking about why there is such an onus on celebrity—and often female celebrities are more tasked with this—of being relatable and being likable. Of exposing something vulnerable and tender, but then also simultaneously needing to be larger than life and unattainable. It seems like an impossible contradiction to uphold. I think that was definitely one of our questions. Why it’s necessary to know. Why you would want all of that magic exposed and revealed. To me, that seems antithetical in the space that art occupies, and not just music. To surrender to something I don’t think requires full cerebral awareness. There’s an emotional relationship to art that I don’t think requires biographical detail.

We were exploring that, but we were also interested in reveling the unknown of someone. Respecting and even allowing oneself to be kind of frightened and disarmed by how much you don’t know. How much you might never be able to know. To question what your relationship is to something that always feels just out of reach. Especially in this age of hyperawareness and instant gratification and a very voracious desire for detail. I think we were trying to explore that in a friendship, too. You’re always trying to peel back that layer, like “Is this really you? Is this really you?” And ending up at the answer of “Oh, maybe this isn’t really me either.” Which is one life’s longest journeys: Trying to get the core of who we are. And, for the most part, we were trying to have fun with all these things. Do a dance around all of these ideas in a way that is hopefully entertaining and not heavy-handed.

In the film, your characters talk about how making art can mean always feeling at odds with the world at large. Do you actually feel that way?

My feeling is that I’m very perplexed by this idea that the things we value are always at the center or the zeitgeist. We value the nowness. When you look back so much of what resonates are things that are actually out of step with their time. They’re ahead of it. They’re concomitant to it. They’re maybe behind it. But they’re not in lock step. And I think we’re just in this strange time where we’re supposed to be showing up fully formed and maybe that’s good for people and relationships, but I don’t know how good it is for art. The artist’s job is vacillate and find the outer edges of things and not just be aiming for the exact bullseye. There shouldn’t be a bullseye. To me, that is just the most conformist thing.

Personally, I struggle because we’re like, “Oh, we’ve got to be aiming for that bullseye.” But there’s something that feels so grotesquely capitalist about this idea of an artistic bullseye. How could that bullseye not be a product of mediocrity and capitalism. But then you’re like, “Wait—I do want that!” So you aim for that far edge and hope people come meet you over there. There’s a lot of value on things hitting now in the moment and it takes a lot of patience and faith in yourself to trust that if you’re not right in that fiery core of normalcy that people will still find you.

‘The Nowhere Inn’ Intentionally Evades the ‘Grotesquely Capitalist Artistic Bullseye’

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Argyle, Fort Edward fire departments no longer have to travel 28+ miles for training

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Argyle, Fort Edward fire departments no longer have to travel 28+ miles for training

ARGYLE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Over the weekend, two Washington County fire departments came together to make life easier for both of them.

Firefighters and community members from Argyle and Fort Edward fire departments gathered on Saturday outside a new, three-story training facility that will keep both departments closer to home.

The new building will mean an end to both departments taking their staff, equipment and firefighting vehicles to Saratoga County’s training facility in Milton, a regular practice in previous years.

Doing so meant taking those personnel and assets far away from where they would be needed in case of fire; about 28 miles away for Fort Edward, and nearly 35 for Argyle.

Pete Kitchner, Fort Edward Fire Department’s Chief of Training, thanked those who helped bring the structure into being.

It’s built out of shipping containers, allowing for a variety of training options and different layouts in order to simulate different real-life scenarios firefighters might find themselves in.

Trainees can get experience with live fires, indoor burns, roof operations and rescue, wall breaches, emergency escape, FAST (Firefighter Assist Search Team), standpipe operations and more.

The $200,000 project was several years in the making. Among those thanked on Saturday were Fort Edward Fire District Commissioners; Chiefs Matthew Hurlbert and Tom Plude; and the Fort Edward Fire Department and J.A. Barkley Hose Co. No 1. Inc in Argyle.

Funding for the new training came with help from both departments, with Fort Edward securing funds needed to build the structure, and Argyle getting the money for work onsite to get it built.

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Cherry Creek School Board candidate files lawsuit against the school district

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Cherry Creek School Board candidate files lawsuit against the school district

A Cherry Creek School Board candidate with disabilities has filed a federal lawsuit against the school district, seeking a temporary restraining order that would allow her to run for the board without having to wear a COVID-19 mask during her candidacy at public forums.

Schumé Navarro, in a complaint and motion for a temporary restraining order filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Denver, claims that she is “disabled and unable to wear certain face coverings due to her disabilities.”

A candidate for the District D seat, Navarro’s disability stems from “severe child abuse incidents that included suffocation,” according to the complaint. “The disability causes her to panic and have substantial difficulty concentrating when her mouth or nose is covered.”

A licensed cosmetologist, Navarro graduated from Cherry Creek High School in 2004. She owns and operates Peacock Vanity.

“She simply wants to compete on an equal playing field with the other candidates, without being discriminated against based on her disabilities,” said Dan Burrows, legal director of Public Trust Institute, a Colorado nonprofit organization. Burrows and PTI represent Navarro.

Navarro has filed the necessary documents to run for the board and her name will appear on the November 2021 election ballot, according to the complaint.

On Sept. 14, Navarro was instructed to wear a mask at a candidate forum at Overland High School. She took it off because she was having “difficulty breathing, substantial anxiety, and overwhelming distraction.” the lawsuit said.

On Sept. 21, the school district sent an email to all board members saying they must wear a mask while speaking or be considered a “trespasser” and be barred from school property, according to the lawsuit.

Navarro is seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to allow her to run for the board without wearing a mask. She claims the district is “unlawfully discriminating against her based on her disabilities.”

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Hochul addresses Police Officers’ Memorial Ceremony

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Hochul suspends state hiring freeze

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Gov. Kathy Hochul spoke at the Annual Police Officers’ Memorial Ceremony at the Empire State Plaza. This year’s ceremony recognizes 101 officers:

  • Eight officers from the state Attorney General’s Office, CSX Police Department, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, New York City Police Department (NYPD), and Port Authority Police Department who died in the line of duty before 2019
  • 10 NYPD officers who died in the line of duty in 2019 and 2020
  • 83 officers from the NYPD, PAPD, New York State Police, state Department of Environmental Conservation Police, Cayuga County Sheriff’s Office, Harrison Police Department, and Suffolk County Police Department who died of illnesses from their work at Ground Zero in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001

With their names added, the memorial now honors 1,668 fallen officers.

“We’re remembering 101 brave women and men who gave their lives in order to protect and serve the people of New York State, and it’s vital that we honor their contributions to our public safety,” Hochul said. “These brave officers put their lives in harm’s way so the rest of us could stay safe, and we will never forget the selfless contributions they, their families, and their loved ones have made.”

Hochul also directed the following landmarks to be illuminated blue Tuesday night to honor fallen police:

  • One World Trade Center
  • Grand Central Terminal – Pershing Square Viaduct
  • MTA LIRR – East End Gateway at Penn Station
  • The Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge
  • The Kosciuszko Bridge
  • The Franklin D. Roosevelt Mid-Hudson Bridge
  • The H. Carl McCall SUNY Building
  • State Education Building
  • Alfred E. Smith State Office Building
  • Albany International Airport Gateway
  • The Lake Placid Olympic Jumping Complex
  • The Main Gate and Expo Center at the State Fairgrounds
  • Niagara Falls

Take a look at Hochul’s remarks below:

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New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

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New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

Heinz Packet Roller (Credit: Heinz)

(NEXSTAR) – Kraft Heinz has a new gadget that the company says is “the biggest thing to happen to sauce since packets.”

The Heinz Packet Roller is a pocket-sized, ketchup bottle-shaped doohickey that lets users squeeze the most out of a condiment packet. Heinz says it’s “magically engineered to bring you every last drop.”

“Do not click ‘purchase’ unless you are prepared to change everything about the way you sauce,” advised the Heinz Packet Roller website. “Gone are the days of fumbling with ketchup packets, pants ruined by mustard disasters, and minutes taken off your life trying to get to the bottom of that mayo packet.”

The roller sells for $5.70 and can even be put on a keychain, so it’s always at the ready. It also features a packet-corner cutter, to help slice open the sauces.

Food chains nationwide have experienced a shortage of ketchup packets caused by a surge in takeout and delivery food orders during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Kraft Heinz confirmed to USA TODAY earlier this year that it was working to increase packet supplies — including adding manufacturing lines to raise production by an estimated 25% to 12 billion packets a year.

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Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

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Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

BOSTON (WWLP) — The union representing roughly 1,800 members of the Massachusetts State Police (MSP) says dozens of troopers have resigned as a result of the state’s COVID vaccine mandate. 

Even so, NEWS10’s sister station in Springfield learned Monday night that one State Police trooper has indicated he will resign over the vaccination mandate. No other official notifications of resignations have reportedly been submitted to the department. However, other troopers have reached out to the MSP Human Resources to evaluate their pensions should they choose to resign or retire now.

“To date, dozens of troopers have already submitted their resignation paperwork, some of whom plan to return to other departments offering reasonable alternatives such as mask-wearing and regular testing,” said Michael Cherven, the president of the State Police Association of Massachusetts.

This comes after a judge denied a union request to put the vaccine requirement on hold to allow more time to negotiate terms and conditions. Back in August, Gov. Charlie Baker announced that all executive department employees would be required to show proof of vaccination by October 17 or risk getting fired. 

“Throughout COVID, we have been on the front lines protecting the citizens of Massachusetts and beyond. Simply put, all we are asking for are the same basic accommodations that countless other departments have provided to their first responders, and to treat a COVID-related illness as a line of duty injury,” Cherven added.

Since announcing the mandate, Gov. Baker has stood firm on his decision, saying it’s the best way to protect the public and those who work in public-facing jobs. Several states across the country have mandated vaccinations for their public workers, however, they are allowing a weekly testing alternative to vaccination.

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Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

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Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

East Carolina? Tulsa? No thanks.

South Florida? Temple? Why? So The Daz can feel closer to home?

Don’t do it, CSU.

Take a pass, Joe Parker. Move on, Joyce McConnell. Whatever ails the Rams — stadium debt, brand depreciation and a football program with a Kansas-esque 9-23 record (.281) since August 2018 — won’t be solved by joining the American Athletic Conference. Not all of it, anyway.

We warned you, didn’t we? Texas and Oklahoma announcing they were leaving the Big 12 was only the beginning. Once big dominoes start toppling, it all trickles down eventually. The AAC has reportedly targeted at least two schools along the Front Range — CSU and Air Force — as candidates to replace Cincinnati, Houston and UCF. The Big 12 poached the latter trio from the AAC, as well as BYU, to replace the Longhorns and Sooners after the SEC poached those two gold-diggers.

Look, we get it. Canvas Stadium is too good for the Mountain West. But the Rams’ football program, post-Jim McElwain, isn’t good enough for the Power 5. CSU is one of a handful of schools stuck in Football Bowl Subdivision limbo, scratching and clawing for higher ground before the next flood rolls in.

Again, we get it. The Big 12 dream is toast. McConnell, the university president since 2019, and Parker, the Rams’ athletic director since 2015, want to show the donors something for their patronage. Something beyond a sumptuous view of terrible football.

Don’t do it, CSU.

Oh, we know. On one hand, it’s almost flattering to be asked to join a new conference. By virtue of television payouts, the AAC is a step up from the MW, a circuit that CSU helped found in May 1998 after a clandestine meeting at DIA.

The AAC wants Denver TV eyeballs, given that the markets in Houston (2.5 million television homes, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (UCF, 1.79 million) and Cincinnati (0.926 million) will soon be part of the Big 12’s mangled, gerrymandered footprint.

Only here’s the thing: While you can’t throw a breakfast burrito in our fair burg without hitting a Rammie alum, CSU football under coach Steve Addazio and predecessor Mike Bobo don’t move the broadcast needle a whit.

Four of the Rams’ games in 2019 on the ESPN family of networks reportedly averaged 644,500 viewers per tilt, according to SportsMediaWatch.com. In 2017, the site listed the average audience of Rams appearances on ESPN at 920,000 per game, including streaming.

But the money, you say. Yeah? Read the fine print. CBS Sports’ Dennis Dodd reported earlier this month that ESPN has a clause in its contract with the AAC over “membership composition” that could reduce future payments if the league lost its biggest television markets.

The MW’s deal with FOX and CBS Sports is reportedly worth roughly $4.1 million annually to the Rams. ESPN pays AAC members around $7 million a year — but that was before Houston (No. 8 TV market, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (No. 17) and Cincinnati (No. 36) left the room.

AAC commish Mike Aresco is going to make the argument to the Disney suits that Broncos Country is AAC Country. But when your replacement plan includes Colorado Springs/Pueblo (No. 82 market, 0.38 million TV households) and Fort Collins, you better believe Mickey Mouse is going to want some of that cheese back in his pockets.

Canvas Stadium is 1,748 miles from Temple, a 26-hour drive if you take I-80 straight through. It’s 1,909 miles to the USF campus in Tampa. Follow I-70 for 13 hours to St. Louis, wave “Hi” to Nolan Arenado, take a slight right, then chug another 15 hours south.

Don’t do it, CSU.

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St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

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St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – A St. Louis County officer fired shots at a person wanted for assault after the suspect allegedly pointed a gun at police attempting to make an arrest.

According to Sgt. Tracy Panus, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis County Police Department, the incident happened Tuesday just after 1 p.m., in the 10400 block of Lord Drive.

Panus said officers from the department’s Special Response Unit were attempting to arrest a suspect wanted for a domestic assault suspect, who was seated in a car on Lord Drive.

As the suspect got out of the vehicle, Panus said the person pointed a firearm at a police officer. The officer fired his own weapon at the suspect.

No one was injured and the suspect was taken into custody without further incident, Panus said.

The officer who fired the shots is 38 years of age with 6 years of law enforcement experience.

The St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons is leading the investigation.

Anyone with information on the investigation is asked to contact the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210. To remain anonymous or potentially receive a reward, contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-TIPS.

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Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

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Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

LAKE COUNTY, Ill. — An elderly north suburban man has died from rabies — the first human case in Illinois since 1954.

In mid-August, a Lake County man in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck. The species was collected and subsequently tested positive for rabies.

Health officials urged the man to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due to its high mortality rate, but the man declined.

One month later, officials said the man began experiencing symptoms consistent with rabies — including neck pain, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness, and difficulty speaking.

The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is typically fatal.

“Rabies has the highest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who quickly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you think you may have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the recommendations of health care providers and public health officials.”

If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it should be appropriately captured for rabies testing. Call your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

So far this year, 30 bats have tested positive for rabies in Illinois.

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COVID-related attacks prompt Missouri hospital to issue panic buttons to employees

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COVID-related attacks prompt Missouri hospital to issue panic buttons to employees

Nurses and hundreds of other staff members will soon begin wearing panic buttons at a Missouri hospital where assaults on workers tripled after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cox Medical Center Branson is using grant money to add buttons to identification badges worn by up to 400 employees who work in the emergency room and inpatient hospital rooms. Pushing the button will immediately alert hospital security, launching a tracking system that will send help to the endangered worker. The hospital hopes to have the system operational by the end of the year.

A similar program was successfully tested last year at CoxHealth’s Springfield hospital, spokeswoman Kaitlyn McConnell said Tuesday.

Hospital data showed that the number of “security incidents” at the Branson hospital rose from 94 in 2019 to 162 in 2020. Assaults rose from 40 to 123 during that same period, and injuries to health care workers rose from 17 to 78. Data for 2021 was not available.

The delta variant of the virus hit hard in southwestern Missouri starting in June, leaving hospitals so full that many patients were sent to other facilities hundreds of miles away. The hospital in Branson, the popular tourist town known for its many shows and attractions, has been at or near capacity for four months.

CoxHealth’s director of safety and security, Alan Butler, said the panic buttons “fill a critical void.”

“Personal Panic Buttons are one more tool in the battle to keep our staff safe and further demonstrate this organization’s commitment to maintaining a safe work and care environment,” Butler said in a statement.

The Missouri hospital isn’t alone. The Texas Tribune reported earlier this month about the rising number of assaults at Texas hospitals, incidents that officials believe are fueled by a surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations.

Jane McCurley, chief nursing executive for Methodist Healthcare System in Texas, said at a news conference in August that staff members at the San Antonio hospital “have been cursed at, screamed at, threatened with bodily harm and even had knives pulled on them.”

Worldwide, a February report by the Geneva-based Insecurity Insight and the University of California, Berkeley’s Human Rights Center identified more than 1,100 threats or acts of violence against health care workers and facilities last year. Researchers found that about 400 of those attacks were related to COVID-19, many motivated by fear or frustration.

Assaults on health care workers have been a concern for years, Missouri Hospital Association spokesman Dave Dillon said, but COVID-19 “has changed the dynamic in a number of ways.” Among them: The effort to slow the spread of the virus means relatives often can’t accompany a sick person, raising already-high stress levels.

Jackie Gatz, vice president of safety and preparedness for the Missouri Hospital Association, said the use of a button alert is among many steps hospitals are taking to protect workers. Security cameras are being added, and some security personnel are wearing body cameras. CoxHealth added security dogs late last year in Springfield.

The Missouri Hospital Association also provides training to help workers protect themselves, including training on how to recognize and de-escalate when someone becomes agitated. Gatz said nurses and staff also are encouraged to stand between the hospital bed and the door.

“You can control your environment without necessarily placing physical barriers,” Gatz said.

By JIM SALTER, Associated Press

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Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on five-year, max extension: My path is “so much more gratifying”

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Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on five-year, max extension: My path is “so much more gratifying”

SAN DIEGO – Michael Porter Jr. knew the news was coming but was the last to see it drop.

As Porter pulled up to the airport Monday afternoon, only hours after the Nuggets concluded their unofficial media day and were about to depart for training camp, he got a call from his agent, Mark Bartelstein.

The news — Porter’s five-year, max contract extension worth as much as $207 million — was about to leak.

“I’m the last one on the airplane,” Porter recounted following the first day of training camp from the University of California San Diego gym.

“I walk on there and everybody, man, it just shows so much about this team and this culture because I walked in there, and everybody was just hyped. … They’d seen it before me. They’d seen it on their phone on Instagram and Twitter. Will (Barton) was like, ‘Mike!’”

The deal, which had been in the works for months, gave Porter and his teammates something to celebrate for the two-hour flight.

“It’s funny how quickly news breaks in the NBA,” Nuggets coach Michael Malone said. “Even before we took off from Denver to come out here, word was spreading throughout the airplane and guys were giving him the business.”

A day after Porter became the Nuggets’ third max contract player on the roster, locking in a potential championship trio for the foreseeable future, the 23-year-old appeared unimpressed with his accomplishment. Humble and sheepish, Porter said he was at a loss for words.

“In my opinion, it’s like, I don’t deserve this,” he said. “There’s people that are just as talented as me in other fields of life. Say you’re a professional ping-pong player. You’re not making that many millions of dollars …”

Porter hasn’t earmarked his windfall for anything in particular, he said, but he did plan to take care of certain people who helped him reach Monday’s landmark deal.

It was only three years ago when there was a question whether Porter would ever play basketball again following his second back surgery. Porter recalled training camp 2018 in San Diego, when he, Jarred Vanderbilt and Isaiah Thomas hobbled around the court, unable to contribute to the title quest.

To be back in San Diego on Tuesday, having secured his future in Denver for the next six years, became somewhat of a pinch-me moment for Porter.

“I think it’s a lot more gratifying,” Porter said. “I’m one of those dudes, that even growing up, I didn’t think of it like, ‘Dang, I’m going to be making millions of dollars when I go to the NBA.’ I thought of it as, ‘Dang, I’m going to get to play against LeBron, KD.’ It was never about the money for me.

“… The road that I took made it so much more gratifying,” he said.

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