Connect with us

News

Trevor Story and Brendan Rodgers homer in Rockies’ road victory over Braves

Published

on

Trevor Story and Brendan Rodgers homer in Rockies’ road victory over Braves

Are the Rockies finally solving their season-long road woes?

Colorado defeated the Atlanta Braves, 5-4, on Tuesday night at Truist Park to improve the team to 4-1 at the halfway point of its current 10-game road trip. Trevor Story and Brendan Rodgers both homered to bolster a resilient Jon Gray start.

The Rockies (67-78) play again on Wednesday in their second of three games in Atlanta. Colorado improved to 22-51 away from Coors Field this year.

The Rockies overcame an early scare on Tuesday. Gray, in his first at-bat, appeared to take a pitch off his right fingertips on a bunt attempt facing Atlanta starter Touki Toussaint. Gray initially winced in pain as athletic trainers examined him for several moments. He returned to the plate and struck out.

Gray — after repeatedly flexing his right hand — stayed in the game to pitch. He didn’t seem fazed.

“A lot of concern,” manager Bud Black said. “A 97-mile-per-hour sinking fastball with movement that hits you on the tip of your index finger of your throwing hand … we got lucky. That could have been a fractured index finger. … But that wasn’t the case. It was sore from the top of the knuckle to the tip of the finger. But the soreness resolved itself relatively quickly.”

Gray fanned seven Braves and threw strikes on 61 of 90 pitches over five innings. He gave up a tying run in the fourth, 2-2, after consecutive doubles from Travis d’Arnaud and Dansby Swanson. But Gray retired the Braves in order to end the fifth and he got plenty of run support.

Story’s recent power surge continued in the second with a home run blasted 430 feet to center. Then Ryan McMahon walked, Elias Diaz singled, and Garrett Hampson gave Colorado a 2-1 lead with an RBI single. Rodgers put Colorado ahead in the fifth, 4-2, with a two-run homer after Raimel Tapia singled. Hampson tripled in the sixth and scored on a Rio Ruiz sacrifice fly.

“We’re playing good ball right now,” Rodgers said. “We’re just trying to ruin playoff hopes, honestly. It’s kind of fun winning these big games and close games against really good teams. … Just keep getting those timely hits.”

Colorado’s bullpen combination of Daniel Bard and Tyler Kinley held the Braves scoreless.

Atlanta clawed back in the eighth, 5-4, with an Adam Duvall two-run homer off Rockies’ reliever Jhoulys Chacin. But Carlos Estevez earned his eighth save of the season.

Gray got off to a rough start in the first with three allowed hits, including a Freddy Freeman RBI single, for an early 1-0 Braves advantage.

Hilliard’s dad loses ALS battle. The Rockies family lost a cherished parental force in the clubhouse.

Jim Hilliard, the father of outfielder Sam Hilliard, died Sunday as the result of ALS — also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease — after being diagnosed in 2018. The family announced his passing on Tuesday in a Twitter post (@TeamHilliardALS): Our Jim Hilliard conquered ALS early Sunday, September 12, 2021, and left his broken body behind for glory and eternity with his Heavenly Father. ALS is cruel, but Jim Hilliard faced it with courage, grace, and a faith that was amazing. We will miss him.

google news
Advertisement
Click to comment

News

New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

Published

on

New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

Heinz Packet Roller (Credit: Heinz)

(NEXSTAR) – Kraft Heinz has a new gadget that the company says is “the biggest thing to happen to sauce since packets.”

The Heinz Packet Roller is a pocket-sized, ketchup bottle-shaped doohickey that lets users squeeze the most out of a condiment packet. Heinz says it’s “magically engineered to bring you every last drop.”

“Do not click ‘purchase’ unless you are prepared to change everything about the way you sauce,” advised the Heinz Packet Roller website. “Gone are the days of fumbling with ketchup packets, pants ruined by mustard disasters, and minutes taken off your life trying to get to the bottom of that mayo packet.”

The roller sells for $5.70 and can even be put on a keychain, so it’s always at the ready. It also features a packet-corner cutter, to help slice open the sauces.

Food chains nationwide have experienced a shortage of ketchup packets caused by a surge in takeout and delivery food orders during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Kraft Heinz confirmed to USA TODAY earlier this year that it was working to increase packet supplies — including adding manufacturing lines to raise production by an estimated 25% to 12 billion packets a year.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

Published

on

Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

BOSTON (WWLP) — The union representing roughly 1,800 members of the Massachusetts State Police (MSP) says dozens of troopers have resigned as a result of the state’s COVID vaccine mandate. 

Even so, NEWS10’s sister station in Springfield learned Monday night that one State Police trooper has indicated he will resign over the vaccination mandate. No other official notifications of resignations have reportedly been submitted to the department. However, other troopers have reached out to the MSP Human Resources to evaluate their pensions should they choose to resign or retire now.

“To date, dozens of troopers have already submitted their resignation paperwork, some of whom plan to return to other departments offering reasonable alternatives such as mask-wearing and regular testing,” said Michael Cherven, the president of the State Police Association of Massachusetts.

This comes after a judge denied a union request to put the vaccine requirement on hold to allow more time to negotiate terms and conditions. Back in August, Gov. Charlie Baker announced that all executive department employees would be required to show proof of vaccination by October 17 or risk getting fired. 

“Throughout COVID, we have been on the front lines protecting the citizens of Massachusetts and beyond. Simply put, all we are asking for are the same basic accommodations that countless other departments have provided to their first responders, and to treat a COVID-related illness as a line of duty injury,” Cherven added.

Since announcing the mandate, Gov. Baker has stood firm on his decision, saying it’s the best way to protect the public and those who work in public-facing jobs. Several states across the country have mandated vaccinations for their public workers, however, they are allowing a weekly testing alternative to vaccination.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

Published

on

Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

East Carolina? Tulsa? No thanks.

South Florida? Temple? Why? So The Daz can feel closer to home?

Don’t do it, CSU.

Take a pass, Joe Parker. Move on, Joyce McConnell. Whatever ails the Rams — stadium debt, brand depreciation and a football program with a Kansas-esque 9-23 record (.281) since August 2018 — won’t be solved by joining the American Athletic Conference. Not all of it, anyway.

We warned you, didn’t we? Texas and Oklahoma announcing they were leaving the Big 12 was only the beginning. Once big dominoes start toppling, it all trickles down eventually. The AAC has reportedly targeted at least two schools along the Front Range — CSU and Air Force — as candidates to replace Cincinnati, Houston and UCF. The Big 12 poached the latter trio from the AAC, as well as BYU, to replace the Longhorns and Sooners after the SEC poached those two gold-diggers.

Look, we get it. Canvas Stadium is too good for the Mountain West. But the Rams’ football program, post-Jim McElwain, isn’t good enough for the Power 5. CSU is one of a handful of schools stuck in Football Bowl Subdivision limbo, scratching and clawing for higher ground before the next flood rolls in.

Again, we get it. The Big 12 dream is toast. McConnell, the university president since 2019, and Parker, the Rams’ athletic director since 2015, want to show the donors something for their patronage. Something beyond a sumptuous view of terrible football.

Don’t do it, CSU.

Oh, we know. On one hand, it’s almost flattering to be asked to join a new conference. By virtue of television payouts, the AAC is a step up from the MW, a circuit that CSU helped found in May 1998 after a clandestine meeting at DIA.

The AAC wants Denver TV eyeballs, given that the markets in Houston (2.5 million television homes, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (UCF, 1.79 million) and Cincinnati (0.926 million) will soon be part of the Big 12’s mangled, gerrymandered footprint.

Only here’s the thing: While you can’t throw a breakfast burrito in our fair burg without hitting a Rammie alum, CSU football under coach Steve Addazio and predecessor Mike Bobo don’t move the broadcast needle a whit.

Four of the Rams’ games in 2019 on the ESPN family of networks reportedly averaged 644,500 viewers per tilt, according to SportsMediaWatch.com. In 2017, the site listed the average audience of Rams appearances on ESPN at 920,000 per game, including streaming.

But the money, you say. Yeah? Read the fine print. CBS Sports’ Dennis Dodd reported earlier this month that ESPN has a clause in its contract with the AAC over “membership composition” that could reduce future payments if the league lost its biggest television markets.

The MW’s deal with FOX and CBS Sports is reportedly worth roughly $4.1 million annually to the Rams. ESPN pays AAC members around $7 million a year — but that was before Houston (No. 8 TV market, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (No. 17) and Cincinnati (No. 36) left the room.

AAC commish Mike Aresco is going to make the argument to the Disney suits that Broncos Country is AAC Country. But when your replacement plan includes Colorado Springs/Pueblo (No. 82 market, 0.38 million TV households) and Fort Collins, you better believe Mickey Mouse is going to want some of that cheese back in his pockets.

Canvas Stadium is 1,748 miles from Temple, a 26-hour drive if you take I-80 straight through. It’s 1,909 miles to the USF campus in Tampa. Follow I-70 for 13 hours to St. Louis, wave “Hi” to Nolan Arenado, take a slight right, then chug another 15 hours south.

Don’t do it, CSU.

google news
Continue Reading

News

St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

Published

on

St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – A St. Louis County officer fired shots at a person wanted for assault after the suspect allegedly pointed a gun at police attempting to make an arrest.

According to Sgt. Tracy Panus, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis County Police Department, the incident happened Tuesday just after 1 p.m., in the 10400 block of Lord Drive.

Panus said officers from the department’s Special Response Unit were attempting to arrest a suspect wanted for a domestic assault suspect, who was seated in a car on Lord Drive.

As the suspect got out of the vehicle, Panus said the person pointed a firearm at a police officer. The officer fired his own weapon at the suspect.

No one was injured and the suspect was taken into custody without further incident, Panus said.

The officer who fired the shots is 38 years of age with 6 years of law enforcement experience.

The St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons is leading the investigation.

Anyone with information on the investigation is asked to contact the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210. To remain anonymous or potentially receive a reward, contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-TIPS.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

Published

on

Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

LAKE COUNTY, Ill. — An elderly north suburban man has died from rabies — the first human case in Illinois since 1954.

In mid-August, a Lake County man in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck. The species was collected and subsequently tested positive for rabies.

Health officials urged the man to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due to its high mortality rate, but the man declined.

One month later, officials said the man began experiencing symptoms consistent with rabies — including neck pain, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness, and difficulty speaking.

The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is typically fatal.

“Rabies has the highest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who quickly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you think you may have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the recommendations of health care providers and public health officials.”

If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it should be appropriately captured for rabies testing. Call your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

So far this year, 30 bats have tested positive for rabies in Illinois.

google news
Continue Reading

News

COVID-related attacks prompt Missouri hospital to issue panic buttons to employees

Published

on

COVID-related attacks prompt Missouri hospital to issue panic buttons to employees

Nurses and hundreds of other staff members will soon begin wearing panic buttons at a Missouri hospital where assaults on workers tripled after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cox Medical Center Branson is using grant money to add buttons to identification badges worn by up to 400 employees who work in the emergency room and inpatient hospital rooms. Pushing the button will immediately alert hospital security, launching a tracking system that will send help to the endangered worker. The hospital hopes to have the system operational by the end of the year.

A similar program was successfully tested last year at CoxHealth’s Springfield hospital, spokeswoman Kaitlyn McConnell said Tuesday.

Hospital data showed that the number of “security incidents” at the Branson hospital rose from 94 in 2019 to 162 in 2020. Assaults rose from 40 to 123 during that same period, and injuries to health care workers rose from 17 to 78. Data for 2021 was not available.

The delta variant of the virus hit hard in southwestern Missouri starting in June, leaving hospitals so full that many patients were sent to other facilities hundreds of miles away. The hospital in Branson, the popular tourist town known for its many shows and attractions, has been at or near capacity for four months.

CoxHealth’s director of safety and security, Alan Butler, said the panic buttons “fill a critical void.”

“Personal Panic Buttons are one more tool in the battle to keep our staff safe and further demonstrate this organization’s commitment to maintaining a safe work and care environment,” Butler said in a statement.

The Missouri hospital isn’t alone. The Texas Tribune reported earlier this month about the rising number of assaults at Texas hospitals, incidents that officials believe are fueled by a surge in COVID-19 hospitalizations.

Jane McCurley, chief nursing executive for Methodist Healthcare System in Texas, said at a news conference in August that staff members at the San Antonio hospital “have been cursed at, screamed at, threatened with bodily harm and even had knives pulled on them.”

Worldwide, a February report by the Geneva-based Insecurity Insight and the University of California, Berkeley’s Human Rights Center identified more than 1,100 threats or acts of violence against health care workers and facilities last year. Researchers found that about 400 of those attacks were related to COVID-19, many motivated by fear or frustration.

Assaults on health care workers have been a concern for years, Missouri Hospital Association spokesman Dave Dillon said, but COVID-19 “has changed the dynamic in a number of ways.” Among them: The effort to slow the spread of the virus means relatives often can’t accompany a sick person, raising already-high stress levels.

Jackie Gatz, vice president of safety and preparedness for the Missouri Hospital Association, said the use of a button alert is among many steps hospitals are taking to protect workers. Security cameras are being added, and some security personnel are wearing body cameras. CoxHealth added security dogs late last year in Springfield.

The Missouri Hospital Association also provides training to help workers protect themselves, including training on how to recognize and de-escalate when someone becomes agitated. Gatz said nurses and staff also are encouraged to stand between the hospital bed and the door.

“You can control your environment without necessarily placing physical barriers,” Gatz said.

By JIM SALTER, Associated Press

google news
Continue Reading

News

Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on five-year, max extension: My path is “so much more gratifying”

Published

on

Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on five-year, max extension: My path is “so much more gratifying”

SAN DIEGO – Michael Porter Jr. knew the news was coming but was the last to see it drop.

As Porter pulled up to the airport Monday afternoon, only hours after the Nuggets concluded their unofficial media day and were about to depart for training camp, he got a call from his agent, Mark Bartelstein.

The news — Porter’s five-year, max contract extension worth as much as $207 million — was about to leak.

“I’m the last one on the airplane,” Porter recounted following the first day of training camp from the University of California San Diego gym.

“I walk on there and everybody, man, it just shows so much about this team and this culture because I walked in there, and everybody was just hyped. … They’d seen it before me. They’d seen it on their phone on Instagram and Twitter. Will (Barton) was like, ‘Mike!’”

The deal, which had been in the works for months, gave Porter and his teammates something to celebrate for the two-hour flight.

“It’s funny how quickly news breaks in the NBA,” Nuggets coach Michael Malone said. “Even before we took off from Denver to come out here, word was spreading throughout the airplane and guys were giving him the business.”

A day after Porter became the Nuggets’ third max contract player on the roster, locking in a potential championship trio for the foreseeable future, the 23-year-old appeared unimpressed with his accomplishment. Humble and sheepish, Porter said he was at a loss for words.

“In my opinion, it’s like, I don’t deserve this,” he said. “There’s people that are just as talented as me in other fields of life. Say you’re a professional ping-pong player. You’re not making that many millions of dollars …”

Porter hasn’t earmarked his windfall for anything in particular, he said, but he did plan to take care of certain people who helped him reach Monday’s landmark deal.

It was only three years ago when there was a question whether Porter would ever play basketball again following his second back surgery. Porter recalled training camp 2018 in San Diego, when he, Jarred Vanderbilt and Isaiah Thomas hobbled around the court, unable to contribute to the title quest.

To be back in San Diego on Tuesday, having secured his future in Denver for the next six years, became somewhat of a pinch-me moment for Porter.

“I think it’s a lot more gratifying,” Porter said. “I’m one of those dudes, that even growing up, I didn’t think of it like, ‘Dang, I’m going to be making millions of dollars when I go to the NBA.’ I thought of it as, ‘Dang, I’m going to get to play against LeBron, KD.’ It was never about the money for me.

“… The road that I took made it so much more gratifying,” he said.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Local health care workers protest COVID vaccine mandate

Published

on

Local health care workers protest COVID vaccine mandate

CREVE COUER, Mo. – Hundreds of health care workers nationwide continue to protest mandatory COVID vaccines as deadlines approach that could see them lose their jobs.

In the St. Louis area, health care officials insist the vaccines are safe and while they understand people’s concerns, their position on mandatory vaccination remains unchanged.

On Monday, dozens protested outside Mercy Hospital in Creve Coeur. For context, Mercy employs approximately 44,000 people.

The deadline for healthcare workers to be vaccinated is just days away.

Mercy Hospital released this statement:

While Mercy respects differences of opinion about the COVID-19 vaccine and co-workers’ right to assemble and make their voices heard, Mercy’s position remains unchanged. Mercy co-workers have until this Thursday to complete their COVID-19 vaccination, receive an exemption or submit proof of the vaccination they have already completed.

We anticipated a small number of our co-workers would wait until the last days to meet our vaccination policy requirements before facing an unpaid suspension for up to 28 days. We will have an accurate number of co-workers who chose not to comply with the policy, including receiving approval for an exemption, after the suspension period has expired at the end of October.

Mercy Hospitals is not alone in issuing a vaccine mandate.

In June, BJC HealthCare required all team members receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Affinia Health Care is requiring its nearly 400 health care workers to be vaccinated.

“Professionally, I’m around patients who are vulnerable, who are pregnant, and I think it’s my responsibility to keep myself healthy, and also keep the community as healthy as possible,” said Dr. Melissa Tepe, Affinia’s chief medical officer.

Steve Harmon, the vice president of human resources at Affinia, said vaccines are safe and effective and encouraged health care professionals to get vaccinated

“We here at Affinia Healthcare mandated our employees to receive the vaccine because, as a healthcare organization, we want to make sure our employees and our patients and the general public are safe,” he said. “We believe that the vaccine will help us accomplish that.”

google news
Continue Reading

News

Sedalia, Mo. man admits he tried to have victim of sex crime murdered

Published

on

Sex offender accused of exposing himself near Edwardsville High School

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A 57-year-old Sedalia man admitted in federal court that he tried to arrange the murder of a victim in a statutory sodomy case.

Jon Mark Wilson pleaded guilty Tuesday to using a cell phone and crossing state lines in the commission of a murder for hire. He admitted that he paid an undercover agent $2,000 to murder the victim in a statutory sodomy case.

Prosecutors said Wilson asked another person in January 2019 to arrange the murder. That person contacted law enforcement and arranged a meeting with the undercover officer in Kansas City, Kansas.

Wilson was arrested after he gave the officer $2,000 and agreed to pay $5,000 more after the murder.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Human cases of West Nile virus reported in St. Louis County

Published

on

Human cases of West Nile virus reported in St. Louis County

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – Two St. Louis County residents recently tested positive for West Nile virus, the county health department said Tuesday.

Both individuals were recently released from local hospitals after being treated for West Nile symptoms.

Since 2011, the county has only recorded 11 confirmed human cases of WNV.

The virus is spread through the bite of a mosquito that had been feeding on an infected bird.

You can reduce your risk of exposure by staying indoors when mosquitoes are most active, eliminating sources of standing water (clogged gutters, pool covers, potted plants, birdbaths, and tire swings), and keeping doors and windows shut in the evening.

Health officials say using insect repellents that contain 20% – 50% DEET or Picaridin, wearing light-colored clothes, and covering exposed skin can also protect from mosquitoes and the diseases they carry. You can also treat birdbaths, ponds, and other water sources that cannot be drained with products containing Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti).

The most serious cases of West Nile can be deadly.

The elderly are more at risk of getting sick because their immune system is often weaker.

The CDC says that most people infected with West Nile virus do not develop any symptoms. About 1 in 5 people who are infected develop a fever with other symptoms such as headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash. Serious illness, such as encephalitis and meningitis, is possible.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending