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Colorado’s COVID outbreaks and hospitalizations rise, but cases may be turning around

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Colorado’s COVID outbreaks and hospitalizations rise, but cases may be turning around

Colorado’s COVID-19 picture is murky as hospitalizations and outbreaks continue to rise, but cases show signs they might be starting to fall.

State epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy said the seven-day average of new COVID-19 cases has gone down over the last few days, but it’s not clear if that’s the start of a plateau or a sustained decrease — or a blip before cases start to rise again. The average peaked at about 1,933 cases per day on Sept. 5, then dropped to around 1,773 as of Tuesday.

“It’s an unclear trend to me,” she said during a news briefing Wednesday.

COVID-19 hospitalizations are still increasing, though not as quickly as they were last week. If cases are truly falling, hospitalizations should follow in the near future. If they don’t, that could be a sign that the decrease in cases was a blip, or reflected insufficient testing.

The number of outbreaks in the state also continued rising, from 291 last week to 362 on Wednesday. More than one-third of current outbreaks are in schools.

In most settings, an outbreak is defined as five or more cases sharing some link. In a school, that could be a class or extracurricular activity that the students shared, or that they rode the bus together. When one school has multiple smaller clusters, the state reports them together.

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are an exception, and have to declare an outbreak after two linked cases. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reported 67 nursing homes and 46 assisted living facilities had clusters, which was a combined increase of 13 from last week.

Outbreaks are particularly concerning in long-term-care facilities because their residents are at high risk for severe illness or death. The current outbreaks have infected 289 residents and 365 staff members. Ten residents have died.

As of Wednesday, 127 schools had outbreaks, up from 80 a week ago. So far, the active outbreaks have affected 1,379 students and 204 staff members. No one has died.

The majority of the outbreaks involved five or fewer people, but 11 schools had 30 or more cases:

  • Loveland High School, Thompson R2-J Schools: 46 student cases, three staff cases
  • Douglas County High School, Douglas County School District: 35 students, seven staff
  • Power Technical Early College, Falcon District 49: 35 students, seven staff
  • Northridge High School, Weld County District 6: 37 students, two staff
  • Eagle Valley High School, Eagle County Schools: 37 students, zero staff
  • Mesa Middle School, DCSD: 33 students, four staff
  • Horizon Middle School, Falcon: 29 students, four staff
  • Elbert School, Elbert District 200: 21 students, 11 staff
  • Mortensen Elementary School, Jeffco Public Schools: 22 students, eight staff
  • Resurrection Christian Middle/High School: 24 students, six staff
  • STEM School Highlands Ranch, DCSD: 30 students, zero staff

The outbreaks data may not capture the full picture because of delays in reporting. For example, Larimer County Public Health has linked 43 cases to Resurrection Christian School, according to The Coloradoan, but the state’s total is almost one-third lower.

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Rapids continue streak of draws in scoreless “dogfight” against Toronto FC

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Rapids continue streak of draws in scoreless “dogfight” against Toronto FC

The Colorado Rapids failed for the fourth straight game to earn three points as they drew with Toronto FC 0-0 on Saturday night at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park.

Toronto FC is in last place in the Eastern Conference and has only won four games. It had not earned points on the road (either win or draw) since July 24, over two months.

Yet once again, the Rapids couldn’t seal the deal in a very winnable match.

“We probably weren’t as sharp in the attacking end as we needed to be,” Rapids head coach Robin Fraser said. “And at the end of the day it became a real dogfight. And credit to them, they did a good job of making it difficult for us. And while we had a few good moments, probably not as many good moments as we would have liked to have had.”

The Rapids tried to create chances by using the wide areas of the pitch and delivering balls into the box either for headers or on the ground for teammate to finish. The issue was there either was not a teammate there or the teammate could not finish. The Rapids sent in a total of 28 crosses in the game compared to Toronto’s seven.

“I feel like we felt like the last 15-20 minutes, we wanted to go and get that goal so badly we just rushed things,” Colorado captain Jack Price said. “And there was plenty of time left in the game. We’ve scored many late goals here at home and we just got to be a little bit more patient, a little bit more quality around a box.”

Price alluded to utilizing the midfield more often instead of always looking to get the ball moving forward. The Rapids tout one of the best midfields in the league in Price, Kellyn Acosta and Mark-Anthony Kaye, but they failed to utilize them properly Saturday night.

“Maybe we should have been a bit more patient, move the ball side to side, because I think it was causing problems,” Price said. “They were getting tired, and I think we were just a bit impatient and getting the ball forward, just ramming it down the attacking players’ throats and maybe just go through the middle a little bit more and use myself and the pivots in there.”

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Real World Economics: Public safety is a public good

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Real World Economics: Public safety is a public good

Crime has complex economics. One can examine it at the micro level in terms of why people commit crimes and what they gain by it, and also in its differing effects on victims’ and perpetrators’ wellbeing. Then one can move to the macro level of how much society is willing to tax itself to control crime and how that money is spent.

Edward Lotterman

This second is a huge issue locally right now. Minneapolis is one of the cities where “defund the police” started, following George Floyd’s murder, and its city council voted for that generally, principally by putting the question on the ballot that voters there are now considering. If passed, it then must grapple with the specifics.

In St. Paul, spending on police versus other measures that might reduce crime is an ever-contentious issue in Mayor Melvin Carter’s budgets. Ramsey County Sheriff Bob Fletcher has been sparring with county’s commissioners over his budget since December.

All this falls into “public finance.” But these specific local problems serve to exemplify general economic principles that show up everywhere sooner or later.

People don’t want to be the victims of crimes. People don’t like to pay taxes. The tradeoffs between these conflicting desires lie at the core of the public-finance problem. In a democracy, no one runs for office on a platform of “crime is fine!” Few ever say “I’ll raise taxes!” Both are political suicide. Yet crime continues, and taxes end up going up.

So instead we hear conservatives claim to be “tough on crime,” while liberals may prefer, “tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime.” Some progressives may even argue that police are part of the problem, as they have in Minneapolis.

“Tough on crime,” can mean the level of policing or it can mean the judicial system of indicting, trying and carrying out sentences. All these affect crime rates to some degree. All take tax dollars.

Policing works in at least two ways.

First, the very presence of police, beat cops, patrol cars or, increasingly, electronic surveillance, is an immediate hindrance to criminal acts just as fences keep toddlers out of swimming pools.

Secondly, beyond this immediate presence, policing deters some people from potential crime. If you know there is a high probability of being arrested eventually, regardless of cops on the street at the time, rational people are less likely to commit criminal acts.

The full effect of this hinges, however, on the probability of punishment after arrest. It is like the old military problem of “what is the probability of this weapon hitting a tank?,” followed by the conditional, “If hit, what is the probability the tank will be destroyed.”

Intensive policing is ineffective if not followed by effective trial and sentencing. Yet spending a lot of money on prosecutors, courts and prisons is ineffective if the chance of being caught in the first place is low. That is why income tax fraud now comes to hundreds of billions a year.

And all of this depends on the assumption, as that of Chicago Nobel laureate Gary Becker, that crime results from rational decision making. Some do, including much tax fraud. But many others are irrational “crimes of passion,” including murder and assaults. Many financial crimes such as embezzlement stem from addictions to drugs or gambling, which can retard judgment.

Yes, the prospect of harsh punishment can cool some heads some times. But the deterring effect of capital punishment, for example, is overestimated among the public. Minnesota has not executed anyone in more than a century, yet our murder rate is less than a fourth that of several states with the death penalty. Incarceration rates have increased dramatically in some states, such as California, but the changes in their crime rates generally follow national trends or of states that have not become more punitive. So many voters are rightly skeptical about slogans.

“Tough on the causes of crime,” may resonate but these are unclear and diffuse. There is the classic public-finance problem of the lack of “correspondence” between the area paying the taxes — middle- or upper-class low-crime neighborhoods, and the areas seeing the effects of the spending — poorer higher crime neighborhoods. Yes, Minneapolis could choose to tax more than St. Paul and put more police on the streets and beef up public prosecutors. This does have some immediate barrier and deterrence effects. Voters there this fall could also choose to eliminate the City Charter requirement to fund the cops, which could lead to lower taxes — and then what?

But if one city or county spends much more on poverty reduction, addiction treatment, improved education, help to troubled families and the like, the overall results may be very worthwhile. But any specific reduction in crime rates will spill over widely to jurisdictions that don’t choose to so spend tax money.

There also are “collective action” problems. People who have been assaulted or burgled are angry and may be willing to pay higher taxes. Those unaffected may tsk-tsk about crime problems but lack equal motivation. The large mass of those tepid about the issue outweigh the smaller number of those outraged when votes are tallied.

Physical isolation and ethnic or racial differences compound this effect. Many people in a high-education, high-employment, white, physical enclave like my home neighborhood of St. Anthony Park certainly have moral and religious feelings about shootings and murders in Frogtown or North Phalen, but there isn’t the same level of visceral outrage as when such crimes occur a block from our homes. Is it cynical for well-to-do progressives to tell people in crime-ridden neighborhoods what level of policing should be good for them?

Another effect is that when a collective decision to not raise taxes results in ineffective public safety, total private spending increases. The United States is a high-crime nation compared to most countries in Europe or in Australia and New Zealand having income levels and lifestyles similar to ours. And we spend far more on private security companies for businesses, home and car alarm systems and now, shields for catalytic converters, than they do in those countries. Ditto for millions of people spending $1,000 for an AR-15 clone or Glock, just to have in the house, mostly because everyone else seems to be buying one and they don’t want to be outgunned or the only household left unarmed.

We thus spend one way or another without much serious collective consideration of which mode of spending is most effective and most just for our society as a whole. Tragically, with the growing political divisions and burgeoning appeals to divisiveness, both on social media and within politics, we are headed in the wrong direction.

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Brandon Belt blasts Giants past Rockies with 846 feet worth of homers

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Brandon Belt blasts Giants past Rockies with 846 feet worth of homers

Saturday was Larry Walker’s night, but it was Brandon Belt’s game.

After the Rockies retired Walker’s No. 33, the Giants veteran first baseman smashed 846 feet worth of homers to slug first-place San Francisco past Colorado 7-2 at Coors Field.

Following Walker’s pregame ceremony that delayed first pitch by 25 minutes, Belt drove Jon Gray’s ninth pitch 425 feet into the right field seats to set the tone for San Francisco.

But the Rockies responded in the bottom of the first against Giants right-hander Anthony DeSclafani. Brendan Rodgers and Charlie Blackmon got things going with singles, then C.J. Cron’s RBI groundout and Ryan McMahon’s two-out RBI double gave Colorado a 2-1 lead.

Belt wasn’t done, though. Which is not a surprise for a Rockies killer who had 21 career homers in 75 games against Colorado entering Saturday, more than any other team the lefty slugger’s faced in his 11-year career, in addition to a .967 OPS at Coors Field.

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Loons start fast but finish unsatisfied with 2-0 win over Houston Dynamo

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Loons start fast but finish unsatisfied with 2-0 win over Houston Dynamo

Fifty-one seconds. That’s all it took for Minnesota United forward Robin Lod to score in Saturday’s match against Houston Dynamo at Allianz Field. He was doing his Robin Hood celebration before supporters got comfortable in their seats.

The perfect start represented the fastest goal in the Loons’ MLS history, surpassing Adrien Hunou’s second-minute goal at Portland just three months ago. Ethan Finlay doubled the lead when his shot took a deflection and barely crossed the line in the 17th minute.

The pretty goal and an ugly one were enough for MNUFC to ride to a 2-0 win. It meant two victories from the Loons, and more distance from an “embarrassing” 4-0 loss to K.C. 10 days ago, but there was discontent emanating from the Loons dressing room.

“Started the game well and then gradually got worse from there,” manager Adrian Heath said. “… Thought we played too slow. Thought we played too negatively. Went back when we could have gone forward.”

Finlay scored his 50th career MLS goal. He said he didn’t hear his coach’s view but pretty much echoed it: “It’s a weird night. It’s a somber three points.”

In the lightest — and certainly cutest — moment to confirm Minnesota did in fact came away with a victory was center back Michael Boxall bringing his 1-year-old son Beau in the news conference room. “(Beau’s) probably surprised he stayed awake the whole 90 minutes,” Michael said.

Beau went into the arms of PR person Gabriela Lozada to the side as Michael got into the dissatisfaction. Like the Loons players and coach, Beau was primarily content, if not a little fussy.

“We lost our way a little bit and weren’t as sharp as we should have been and would have liked to have been,” Michael said. “But three points is three points.”

Minnesota (10-8-7) moved up the standings and dispatched bottom-tier Houston (5-11-11), which remained winless on the road this season (0-8-6).

“It’s no disrespect to Houston in a way, but we started to kind of play down to their level,” Finlay said. “They wanted that game to be kind of a run-and-gun game and that’s the style they play. But that’s not us. We got away from that. We got a little bit careless.”

After Finlay’s 50th goal, he soon contributed on the defensive end with a diving header clearance to deny former Loon Darwin Quintero a prime scoring chance at the back post. Quintero finished with two shots and three chances created.

Tyler Miller made eight total saves and was awarded man-of-the-match honors for his his ninth clean sheet of the season.

“There is probably one guy on the pitch who can say he earned his paycheck this week,” Finlay said.

It was only the second time this season Heath didn’t make a change (or was forced into one by injury or suspension) with his starting XI. It paid off very early for a second straight game after Emanuel Reynoso scored in the fourth minute in their first three-goal game of the season, a 3-0 win over L.A. Galaxy last weekend.

In that opening minute Saturday, Franco Fragapane set up Lod’s goal with a perfectly-weighted pass. It was the Argentine’s sixth assist of the season to go with two goals. He is now among league leaders with 0.90 goals + assists per 90 minutes, closing the gap on D.C. United’s Ola Kamara (1.52) for the top spot.

Heath subbed out Reynoso in the 60th minute. While Reynoso grabbed for his hamstring in the first half and was stepped on by Tim Parker just before halftime, Reynoso was unhappy to be taken out. But the Loons have been cautious with their star and will travel to D.C. United on Wednesday and FC Dallas next Saturday.

“We need to be playing better than that to beat the top teams,” Finlay said. “… If we have that kind of performance against a top two or three team in the West, (Saturday) might have been really different.”

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Two men killed following fight in apartment complex, Aurora police say

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A death in the East Colfax neighborhood prompts a homicide investigation

Two men are dead following an alleged fight in an apartment complex, Aurora police said Saturday.

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New York prepares for Monday vaccine deadline: Gov. Hochul releases preventable health care staffing shortage

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New York prepares for Monday vaccine deadline: Gov. Hochul releases preventable health care staffing shortage

CAPITAL REGION, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The clock is ticking as New York is approaching the vaccination mandate deadline for healthcare workers. If healthcare employees choose not to get vaccinated by the deadline, they can lose their jobs. In preparation for the Monday deadline, Governor Kathy Hochul is planning to help the healthcare staffing shortage before it gets worse.

“Plenty of notice, plenty of availability, plenty of chances,” Gov. Hochul is referring to the state’s health care employee vaccine mandate. Right now, the industry is already facing a staffing shortage. “Our ambulances throughout the county are experiencing longer wait times to be able to turn the patients over,” says Greene County EMS Coordinator Sean Hotaling.

Hochul plans to sign an executive order if necessary to declare a state of emergency that seeks to increase workforce supply. She says she’s prepared to call in medically trained National Guard members and retirees to help with potential staffing shortages caused by the state’s vaccine mandate. The governor’s order will also allow qualified health care professionals licensed in other states or countries to come work in New York State.

According to state data, as of October 22nd, 84% of all hospital employees in New York State received their shots, the Capital Region reaching 91%, the highest vaccination rate in the state. However, there are still many health care workers in New York who have not been vaccinated.

“As nurses, we are committed to providing the best care for our patients and working with the Governor on these efforts. We need adequate staffing to protect our patients and our colleagues, and we want to do everything we can to avoid returning to crisis levels during the pandemic. We are grateful to Governor Hochul for her leadership and for her bold and strategic plan to support nurses, patients, and ensuring the best possible care.”

Pat Kane, RN, Executive Director of New York State Nurses Association

The State Department of Labor has released guidance clarifying workers who get fired for not getting a vaccine will not be eligible for unemployment insurance, that is unless their doctor has approved their medical exemption.

“UUP will continue to fight for adequate funding and staffing at the SUNY Hospitals and is dedicated to protecting the health and safety of our members and their patients. We understand the step that Governor Hochul is taking in light of the potential staff shortage. We remain hopeful that this step will not be necessary. We continue to urgently call on all UUP members and all New Yorkers to get vaccinated immediately.” 

Frederick E. Kowal, PH.D, President of United University Professions

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St. Paul’s Bix produce warehouse, once envisioned as COVID morgue, to go back on the market

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St. Paul’s Bix produce warehouse, once envisioned as COVID morgue, to go back on the market

Just east of the intersection of Jackson Street and Arlington Avenue, state officials once envisioned the former Bix produce building as a back-up morgue of sorts — a holding facility for up to 5,000 bodies of the victims of the COVID pandemic. Neighbors raised concern about ghosts and evil spirits, and city leaders offered their own objections.

In any event, the planned use never materialized, and the St. Paul Port Authority now wants the building back for future development.

The state purchased the refrigerated warehouse at 1415 L’Orient St. and the five acres of land it sits on from the Port Authority last year for nearly $5.48 million. Under pressure from St. Paul and Ramsey County officials opposed to the idea of warehousing bodies there, the state used the site instead as storage for personal protective equipment. On Tuesday, the board of the Port Authority will meet to vote on whether to purchase the site — which now sits vacant — back from the state for $5.65 million, the property’s current appraised value and the purchase amount required under state statute.

The goal, according to board documents, is to flip the former Bix building as quickly as possible, with the Port Authority looking to secure a letter of intent from a qualified buyer before the end of November. The Port Authority would then finalize the purchase with the state, with a closing scheduled on or around Dec. 1.

The last two major transactions within Port Authority business centers resulted in private storage facilities, which generated little to no employment. Port Authority officials said a produce company, on the other hand, could employ as many as 75 to 100 workers.

“The idea is to find a buyer who will bring jobs to the city of St. Paul,” said Andrea Novak, a marketing manager with the Port Authority. “There is no specific buyer in the wings. We will market this aggressively.”

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Georgia rally marks debut of GOP primary “Trump ticket”

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Georgia rally marks debut of GOP primary “Trump ticket”

PERRY, Ga. — The rewards of an early Donald Trump endorsement were on display Saturday in Georgia when a three-man ticket of candidates he’s backing in 2022 Republican primaries were featured at one of his signature rallies. But GOP opponents of Trump-backed candidates aren’t folding in Georgia and some say the former president’s nod could hurt Republicans in a general election in the closely divided state.

Trump’s endorsement blitz is a frank attempt to keep remaking the party in his image, with Republicans eagerly courting his favor. But like everything else about the former president, it’s a rule-rewriting approach, said Casey Dominguez, a political science professor at the University of San Diego.

“We haven’t seen presidents in recent years try to drive a wedge within their own party, which is what happens in a primary election,” Dominguez said. “He’s playing factional politics in the party.”

It’s easy to see why they might want Trump’s backing. He maintains overwhelming support among Republican voters. Ballotpedia, which tracks Trump endorsements, says candidates he endorsed have won 37 of 43 competitive primaries since 2017.

Trump was joined at the rally in Perry, about 100 miles south of Atlanta by three candidates he has endorsed, including Herschel Walker, who recently launched a Senate campaign. Trump had urged the former football great to challenge Democratic U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock.

In one of his first public appearances since entering the race, Walker on Saturday talked about his relationship with Trump, but also urged his listeners to “come together as a people” and not be upset with others “because they disagree with you.”

Also speaking was U.S. Rep Jody Hice, Trump’s choice against Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger. While Raffensperger refused the former president’s entreaties to “find” enough votes to overturn Trump’s narrow loss to Democratic President Joe Biden in Georgia, Hice objected to Georgia’s electors in Congress.

Completing the trio is state Sen. Burt Jones, an early Trump supporter who pushed measures to overturn Biden’s Georgia win and is running for lieutenant governor.

The rally, though, was all about Trump, who remains the star of his own show as numerous supporters arrived wearing Trump gear.

Despite a lack of credible evidence to support Trump’s allegations of mass voter fraud, the former president has continued to push the “Big Lie” that he won, turning it into a litmus test for GOP candidates. A majority of Republican voters continue to believe the election was stolen, despite dozens of state and local elections officials, numerous judges and Trump’s own attorney general saying Biden won fairly.

Although some primary fields have been winnowed by Trump’s endorsement, that hasn’t happened in Georgia.

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Sheriff’s office: At least 3 killed in Amtrak derailment

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Sheriff’s office: At least 3 killed in Amtrak derailment

JOPLIN, Mont. (AP) — At least three people were killed Saturday afternoon when an Amtrak train that runs between Seattle and Chicago derailed in north-central Montana, an official with the Liberty County Sheriff’s Office said.

Dispatcher Starr Tyler told The Associated Press that three people died in the derailment. She did not have more details. Amtrak said in a statement that there were multiple injuries.

The Empire Builder train derailed about 4 p.m. near Joplin, a town of about 200, Amtrak spokesman Jason Abrams said in a statement. The accident scene is about 150 miles (241 kilometers) north of Helena and about 30 miles (48 kilometers) from the border with Canada.

The train had about 146 passengers and 16 crew members onboard, Abrams said.

The train consisted of two locomotives and 10 cars, with seven of those cars derailing, he said.

Megan Vandervest, a passenger on the train who was going to visit a friend in Seattle, told The New York Times that she was awakened by the derailment.

“My first thought was that we were derailing because, to be honest, I have anxiety and I had heard stories about trains derailing,” said Vandervest, who is from Minneapolis. “My second thought was that’s crazy. We wouldn’t be derailing. Like, that doesn’t happen.”

She told the Times that the car behind hers was tilted over, the one behind that was entirely tipped over, and the three cars behind that “had completely fallen off the tracks and were detached from the train.”

Speaking from the Liberty County Senior Center, where passengers were being taken, Vandervest said it felt like “extreme turbulence on a plane.”

Amtrak was working with the local authorities to transport injured passengers and safely evacuate all other passengers, Abrams added.

The National Transportation Safety Board will send a 14-member team, including investigators and specialists in railroad signals and other disciplines, to investigate the crash, spokesman Eric Weiss said.

Five Amtrak cars derailed around 3:55 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time and no other trains or equipment were involved, Weiss said. The train was traveling on a BNSF Railroad main track at the time, he said.

Photos posted to social media showed several cars on their sides. Passengers were standing alongside the tracks, some carrying luggage.

The images showed sunny skies, and it appeared the accident occurred along a straight section of tracks.

Amtrak said that because of the derailment, the Sunday westbound Empire Builder will terminate in Minneapolis, and the Sunday eastbound Empire Builder train will originate in Minneapolis.

____

Associated Press Tom Krisher contributed to this report.

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Tommies beat down Butler in home opener

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Tommies beat down Butler in home opener

In a season that will continue to be fraught with uncertainty and the unknown, the St. Thomas football team began to answer some questions on Saturday at O’Shaughnessy Stadium.

Playing their first game in the Division I Pioneer Football League, the Tommies manhandled Butler, dominating from beginning to end in a 36-0 victory.

Thrilled with the way his team played on both sides of the ball, excited about an enthusiastic turnout (5,051) and humbled by the presence of a approximately 150 former players, Tommies coach Glenn Caruso is downright giddy about one more major happening that took place on
Saturday.

“We were sitting at breakfast this morning,” Caruso said, “and I turned to our coaches and said, ‘Do you know what I am most excited about besides the game? Whatever happens in the game, we get to go home and watch every game that happened in league tonight.’

“We have an actual data point that is countable. It’s just not guessing out of thin air.”

Likewise, the rest of the league can now can see for itself that while the Tommies’ roster is still dominated by Division III recruits, it is a capable opponent.

Butler was picked in the preseason to finish near the bottom of the Pioneer, but the Tommies’ dominating performance surely got some coaches’ attention.

“The diversity of the league, not just by location, but by recruiting because of that location makes it, is so all over the place,” Caruso said. “It’s been a long time around here since we had no clue what to expect.

“There is a novelty and a romance to being uncertain of what is going to go on.”

Senior safety Rian O’Connor, who made his first start due to Luke Glenna having to sit out the first half after getting a targeting penalty last week, said the Tommies’ confidence in their
abilities helps temper any fear of the unknown.

“The mystery is inevitable,” he said. “This was our first home game in two years. On top of that, it was against a new division and a new league against teams we’ve never played against. It would be easy to get nervous about that, but we just focus on ourselves.”

The Tommies had 424 yards of total offense to 278 for Butler. Senior quarterback Cade Sexauer, making his first start, was rock solid. He completed 17 of 24 passes for 194 yards. He
also ran for 31 yards.

Senior running back Tom Loeffler (61 yards) and sophomore Hope Adebayo (75 yards) both ran the ball effectively.

Loeffler’s 2-yard touchdown run in the first quarter got the scoring started for the Tommies. Sexauer threw an 8-yard touchdown pass to fullback Josh Komis early in the second quarter, and a successful 2-point conversation game the Tommies a 15-0 lead.

Loeffler’s second touchdown of the game, a 5-yard run, gave the Tommies their 22-0 halftime lead.

Senior tight end Max Zimmerman caught a 9-yard touchdown pass from Sexauer in the third quarter. The Tommies closed out their scoring with 34-yard touchdown run by Adebayo.
The Tommies forced two turnovers on defense, a fumble recovery by Seth Beckett and an interception by O’Connor.

Both O’Connor and Caruso praised the job defensive coordinator Walli Kuchinski preparing the defense.

“When you have Coach K in your meetings every week you just feel so confident in the game plan,” O’Connor said. “When you don’t have to think you can play super fast.”

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