Connect with us

News

Head of art museum in Puerto Rico is named Weisman Art Museum’s new director

Published

on

Head of art museum in Puerto Rico is named Weisman Art Museum’s new director

Alejandra Peña-Gutiérrez, who has led the Museo de Arte de Ponce in Puerto Rico since 2013, will be the next director of the University of Minnesota’s Weisman Art Museum.

Peña will begin her new role at WAM on Nov. 29. Her selection was announced Wednesday afternoon.

According to a WAM news release, Peña is an internationally accomplished museum leader and arts professional. She has an educational background in architecture and art history, “along with nearly three decades of experience as an innovative and collaborative leader, curator and educator in internationally prominent museums, cultural institutions and arts professional organizations.”

The Museo de Arte de Ponce is known for its expansive collection of European and Puerto Rican Art. According to the news release, she has strengthened the Museo de Arte de Ponce financially, operationally and programmatically, even in the face of extraordinary challenges including a devastating hurricane and earthquake.

WAM’s interim director and emerita executive vice president and provost, Karen Hanson, called Peña “a dynamic and imaginative museum professional with decades of successful leadership experience in a variety of cultural institutions. She brings a strong international lens to the Weisman, but her work in Mexico and in Puerto Rico, particularly after Hurricane Maria, also makes plain that she will be intensely sensitive to the interests and needs of our various local communities and the many ways in which an art museum can serve both the campus and the broader public.”

Peña has an architecture degree as well as a master’s degree in art history from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, where she has also taught. Before moving to Puerto Rico to lead the Museo de Arte de Ponce, she was Deputy Director-General of Artistic Heritage in Mexico City’s Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes, an umbrella entity for 18 museums.

Peña’s appointment is the culmination of a national search to succeed Lyndel King, who retired in 2020 after serving as director for four decades. The search for her successor began in early 2020, before being briefly paused due to the pandemic.

WAM is currently closed for repairs.

google news
Advertisement
Click to comment

News

Berkshire DA testifies on supervised drug consumption sites

Published

on

Berkshire DA testifies on supervised drug consumption sites

BOSTON (WWLP) — Berkshire County District Attorney Andrea Harrington testified before the Joint Committee on Mental Health, Substance Use and Recovery on the topic of supervised drug consumption sites Monday.

Safe consumptions sites are places where an individual can use controlled substances in the presence of medical professionals. They are considered by many to be an effective tool in combatting the current opioid overdose crisis. These sites have been installed across Canada and versions have been approved by lawmakers in New York, Pennsylvania, and Vermont.

The hearing included a section devoted to decriminalization and another focused on safe consumption sites, also known as supervised injection sites.

Under current law, any individual caught with a controlled substance not “obtained directly, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order, from a practitioner while acting in the course of his professional practice,” could face severe criminal charges. If the proposed bills on decriminalization passes through the Legislature, the criminal component of individuals holding controlled substances would instead face a fine of no more than $50.

More from NEWS10

More from News10

  • ‘She’s giving us signs’: Gabby Petito’s family members mourn slain 22-year-old, say she’s ‘always with us’
  • COVID-related attacks prompt Missouri hospital to issue panic buttons to employees
  • Syracuse hoops holds first practice
  • Guilderland man killed in single-vehicle crash
  • New era: Dwayne Killngs leads first official practice for UAlbany

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Zac Brown Band concert at SPAC canceled

Published

on

Zac Brown Band concert at SPAC canceled

BRANSON, Mo. (AP) – Nurses and hundreds of other staff members will soon begin wearing panic buttons at a Missouri hospital where assaults on workers tripled after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Cox Medical Center Branson is using grant money to add buttons to identification badges worn by up to 400 employees who work in the emergency room and inpatient hospital rooms. Pushing the button will immediately alert hospital security, launching a tracking system that will send help to the endangered worker. The hospital hopes to have the system operational by the end of the year.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Argyle, Fort Edward fire departments no longer have to travel 28+ miles for training

Published

on

Argyle, Fort Edward fire departments no longer have to travel 28+ miles for training

ARGYLE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Over the weekend, two Washington County fire departments came together to make life easier for both of them.

Firefighters and community members from Argyle and Fort Edward fire departments gathered on Saturday outside a new, three-story training facility that will keep both departments closer to home.

The new building will mean an end to both departments taking their staff, equipment and firefighting vehicles to Saratoga County’s training facility in Milton, a regular practice in previous years.

Doing so meant taking those personnel and assets far away from where they would be needed in case of fire; about 28 miles away for Fort Edward, and nearly 35 for Argyle.

Pete Kitchner, Fort Edward Fire Department’s Chief of Training, thanked those who helped bring the structure into being.

It’s built out of shipping containers, allowing for a variety of training options and different layouts in order to simulate different real-life scenarios firefighters might find themselves in.

Trainees can get experience with live fires, indoor burns, roof operations and rescue, wall breaches, emergency escape, FAST (Firefighter Assist Search Team), standpipe operations and more.

The $200,000 project was several years in the making. Among those thanked on Saturday were Fort Edward Fire District Commissioners; Chiefs Matthew Hurlbert and Tom Plude; and the Fort Edward Fire Department and J.A. Barkley Hose Co. No 1. Inc in Argyle.

Funding for the new training came with help from both departments, with Fort Edward securing funds needed to build the structure, and Argyle getting the money for work onsite to get it built.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Cherry Creek School Board candidate files lawsuit against the school district

Published

on

Cherry Creek School Board candidate files lawsuit against the school district

A Cherry Creek School Board candidate with disabilities has filed a federal lawsuit against the school district, seeking a temporary restraining order that would allow her to run for the board without having to wear a COVID-19 mask during her candidacy at public forums.

Schumé Navarro, in a complaint and motion for a temporary restraining order filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Denver, claims that she is “disabled and unable to wear certain face coverings due to her disabilities.”

A candidate for the District D seat, Navarro’s disability stems from “severe child abuse incidents that included suffocation,” according to the complaint. “The disability causes her to panic and have substantial difficulty concentrating when her mouth or nose is covered.”

A licensed cosmetologist, Navarro graduated from Cherry Creek High School in 2004. She owns and operates Peacock Vanity.

“She simply wants to compete on an equal playing field with the other candidates, without being discriminated against based on her disabilities,” said Dan Burrows, legal director of Public Trust Institute, a Colorado nonprofit organization. Burrows and PTI represent Navarro.

Navarro has filed the necessary documents to run for the board and her name will appear on the November 2021 election ballot, according to the complaint.

On Sept. 14, Navarro was instructed to wear a mask at a candidate forum at Overland High School. She took it off because she was having “difficulty breathing, substantial anxiety, and overwhelming distraction.” the lawsuit said.

On Sept. 21, the school district sent an email to all board members saying they must wear a mask while speaking or be considered a “trespasser” and be barred from school property, according to the lawsuit.

Navarro is seeking a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction to allow her to run for the board without wearing a mask. She claims the district is “unlawfully discriminating against her based on her disabilities.”

google news
Continue Reading

News

Hochul addresses Police Officers’ Memorial Ceremony

Published

on

Hochul suspends state hiring freeze

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Gov. Kathy Hochul spoke at the Annual Police Officers’ Memorial Ceremony at the Empire State Plaza. This year’s ceremony recognizes 101 officers:

  • Eight officers from the state Attorney General’s Office, CSX Police Department, Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, New York City Police Department (NYPD), and Port Authority Police Department who died in the line of duty before 2019
  • 10 NYPD officers who died in the line of duty in 2019 and 2020
  • 83 officers from the NYPD, PAPD, New York State Police, state Department of Environmental Conservation Police, Cayuga County Sheriff’s Office, Harrison Police Department, and Suffolk County Police Department who died of illnesses from their work at Ground Zero in the wake of Sept. 11, 2001

With their names added, the memorial now honors 1,668 fallen officers.

“We’re remembering 101 brave women and men who gave their lives in order to protect and serve the people of New York State, and it’s vital that we honor their contributions to our public safety,” Hochul said. “These brave officers put their lives in harm’s way so the rest of us could stay safe, and we will never forget the selfless contributions they, their families, and their loved ones have made.”

Hochul also directed the following landmarks to be illuminated blue Tuesday night to honor fallen police:

  • One World Trade Center
  • Grand Central Terminal – Pershing Square Viaduct
  • MTA LIRR – East End Gateway at Penn Station
  • The Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge
  • The Kosciuszko Bridge
  • The Franklin D. Roosevelt Mid-Hudson Bridge
  • The H. Carl McCall SUNY Building
  • State Education Building
  • Alfred E. Smith State Office Building
  • Albany International Airport Gateway
  • The Lake Placid Olympic Jumping Complex
  • The Main Gate and Expo Center at the State Fairgrounds
  • Niagara Falls

Take a look at Hochul’s remarks below:

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

Published

on

New Heinz roller gets ‘every last drop’ out of ketchup packets

Heinz Packet Roller (Credit: Heinz)

(NEXSTAR) – Kraft Heinz has a new gadget that the company says is “the biggest thing to happen to sauce since packets.”

The Heinz Packet Roller is a pocket-sized, ketchup bottle-shaped doohickey that lets users squeeze the most out of a condiment packet. Heinz says it’s “magically engineered to bring you every last drop.”

“Do not click ‘purchase’ unless you are prepared to change everything about the way you sauce,” advised the Heinz Packet Roller website. “Gone are the days of fumbling with ketchup packets, pants ruined by mustard disasters, and minutes taken off your life trying to get to the bottom of that mayo packet.”

The roller sells for $5.70 and can even be put on a keychain, so it’s always at the ready. It also features a packet-corner cutter, to help slice open the sauces.

Food chains nationwide have experienced a shortage of ketchup packets caused by a surge in takeout and delivery food orders during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Kraft Heinz confirmed to USA TODAY earlier this year that it was working to increase packet supplies — including adding manufacturing lines to raise production by an estimated 25% to 12 billion packets a year.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

Published

on

Dozens of Massachusetts State Police reportedly resign over vaccine mandate

BOSTON (WWLP) — The union representing roughly 1,800 members of the Massachusetts State Police (MSP) says dozens of troopers have resigned as a result of the state’s COVID vaccine mandate. 

Even so, NEWS10’s sister station in Springfield learned Monday night that one State Police trooper has indicated he will resign over the vaccination mandate. No other official notifications of resignations have reportedly been submitted to the department. However, other troopers have reached out to the MSP Human Resources to evaluate their pensions should they choose to resign or retire now.

“To date, dozens of troopers have already submitted their resignation paperwork, some of whom plan to return to other departments offering reasonable alternatives such as mask-wearing and regular testing,” said Michael Cherven, the president of the State Police Association of Massachusetts.

This comes after a judge denied a union request to put the vaccine requirement on hold to allow more time to negotiate terms and conditions. Back in August, Gov. Charlie Baker announced that all executive department employees would be required to show proof of vaccination by October 17 or risk getting fired. 

“Throughout COVID, we have been on the front lines protecting the citizens of Massachusetts and beyond. Simply put, all we are asking for are the same basic accommodations that countless other departments have provided to their first responders, and to treat a COVID-related illness as a line of duty injury,” Cherven added.

Since announcing the mandate, Gov. Baker has stood firm on his decision, saying it’s the best way to protect the public and those who work in public-facing jobs. Several states across the country have mandated vaccinations for their public workers, however, they are allowing a weekly testing alternative to vaccination.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

google news
Continue Reading

News

Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

Published

on

Keeler: CSU Rams should say “no thanks” when American Athletic Conference calls

East Carolina? Tulsa? No thanks.

South Florida? Temple? Why? So The Daz can feel closer to home?

Don’t do it, CSU.

Take a pass, Joe Parker. Move on, Joyce McConnell. Whatever ails the Rams — stadium debt, brand depreciation and a football program with a Kansas-esque 9-23 record (.281) since August 2018 — won’t be solved by joining the American Athletic Conference. Not all of it, anyway.

We warned you, didn’t we? Texas and Oklahoma announcing they were leaving the Big 12 was only the beginning. Once big dominoes start toppling, it all trickles down eventually. The AAC has reportedly targeted at least two schools along the Front Range — CSU and Air Force — as candidates to replace Cincinnati, Houston and UCF. The Big 12 poached the latter trio from the AAC, as well as BYU, to replace the Longhorns and Sooners after the SEC poached those two gold-diggers.

Look, we get it. Canvas Stadium is too good for the Mountain West. But the Rams’ football program, post-Jim McElwain, isn’t good enough for the Power 5. CSU is one of a handful of schools stuck in Football Bowl Subdivision limbo, scratching and clawing for higher ground before the next flood rolls in.

Again, we get it. The Big 12 dream is toast. McConnell, the university president since 2019, and Parker, the Rams’ athletic director since 2015, want to show the donors something for their patronage. Something beyond a sumptuous view of terrible football.

Don’t do it, CSU.

Oh, we know. On one hand, it’s almost flattering to be asked to join a new conference. By virtue of television payouts, the AAC is a step up from the MW, a circuit that CSU helped found in May 1998 after a clandestine meeting at DIA.

The AAC wants Denver TV eyeballs, given that the markets in Houston (2.5 million television homes, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (UCF, 1.79 million) and Cincinnati (0.926 million) will soon be part of the Big 12’s mangled, gerrymandered footprint.

Only here’s the thing: While you can’t throw a breakfast burrito in our fair burg without hitting a Rammie alum, CSU football under coach Steve Addazio and predecessor Mike Bobo don’t move the broadcast needle a whit.

Four of the Rams’ games in 2019 on the ESPN family of networks reportedly averaged 644,500 viewers per tilt, according to SportsMediaWatch.com. In 2017, the site listed the average audience of Rams appearances on ESPN at 920,000 per game, including streaming.

But the money, you say. Yeah? Read the fine print. CBS Sports’ Dennis Dodd reported earlier this month that ESPN has a clause in its contract with the AAC over “membership composition” that could reduce future payments if the league lost its biggest television markets.

The MW’s deal with FOX and CBS Sports is reportedly worth roughly $4.1 million annually to the Rams. ESPN pays AAC members around $7 million a year — but that was before Houston (No. 8 TV market, according to the Nielsen Company), Orlando (No. 17) and Cincinnati (No. 36) left the room.

AAC commish Mike Aresco is going to make the argument to the Disney suits that Broncos Country is AAC Country. But when your replacement plan includes Colorado Springs/Pueblo (No. 82 market, 0.38 million TV households) and Fort Collins, you better believe Mickey Mouse is going to want some of that cheese back in his pockets.

Canvas Stadium is 1,748 miles from Temple, a 26-hour drive if you take I-80 straight through. It’s 1,909 miles to the USF campus in Tampa. Follow I-70 for 13 hours to St. Louis, wave “Hi” to Nolan Arenado, take a slight right, then chug another 15 hours south.

Don’t do it, CSU.

google news
Continue Reading

News

St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

Published

on

St. Louis County officer shoots at armed man while attempting arrest

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – A St. Louis County officer fired shots at a person wanted for assault after the suspect allegedly pointed a gun at police attempting to make an arrest.

According to Sgt. Tracy Panus, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis County Police Department, the incident happened Tuesday just after 1 p.m., in the 10400 block of Lord Drive.

Panus said officers from the department’s Special Response Unit were attempting to arrest a suspect wanted for a domestic assault suspect, who was seated in a car on Lord Drive.

As the suspect got out of the vehicle, Panus said the person pointed a firearm at a police officer. The officer fired his own weapon at the suspect.

No one was injured and the suspect was taken into custody without further incident, Panus said.

The officer who fired the shots is 38 years of age with 6 years of law enforcement experience.

The St. Louis County Police Department’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons is leading the investigation.

Anyone with information on the investigation is asked to contact the St. Louis County Police Department at 636-529-8210. To remain anonymous or potentially receive a reward, contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-TIPS.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

Published

on

Lake County man dies from rabies; first human case in Illinois since 1954

LAKE COUNTY, Ill. — An elderly north suburban man has died from rabies — the first human case in Illinois since 1954.

In mid-August, a Lake County man in his 80s woke up with a bat on his neck. The species was collected and subsequently tested positive for rabies.

Health officials urged the man to start post-exposure rabies treatment, due to its high mortality rate, but the man declined.

One month later, officials said the man began experiencing symptoms consistent with rabies — including neck pain, headache, difficulty controlling his arms, finger numbness, and difficulty speaking.

The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. Without preventive treatment, rabies is typically fatal.

“Rabies has the highest mortality rate of any disease,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike. “However, there is life-saving treatment for individuals who quickly seek care after being exposed to an animal with rabies. If you think you may have been exposed to rabies, immediately seek medical attention and follow the recommendations of health care providers and public health officials.”

If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, do not release the bat as it should be appropriately captured for rabies testing. Call your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed and call animal control to remove the bat.

So far this year, 30 bats have tested positive for rabies in Illinois.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending