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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

With new models across the fence being shined for the Denver Auto Show, more than 600 persons gathered beneath a large tent Tuesday evening on the grounds of the Elitch Gardens to celebrate the induction of the inaugural class for the Colorado Automotive Hall of Fame.

The 12th annual Gala, sponsored by the Colorado Automobile Dealers Association (CADA), featured 50 former Time Dealer Award winners from Colorado as inductees, and many family members were in attendance. I, too, was included in the Hall of Fame honors for my many years of automotive coverage.

At the dinner’s conclusion Tuesday night, the gates into Elitch from its parking areas were opened for an early look at the 2021 auto show.

The show, outdoors for the first time since 1919, officially opened on Wednesday, will continue from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. today and conclude on Sunday, with hours from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
“Dealers consistently and generously contribute to the lives of their communities,” said Tim Jackson, president and CEO of CADA, at the awards dinner, “and we’re very proud to honor these wonderful individuals who have made this industry a driving force in our state.”

Emcees were Ed Greene and Claudia Garofalo, of KUSA9, and presenting the awards were Steve Zeder, CADA chair, of Glenwood Springs, and Anthony Brownlee, auto show chair for the CADA.

Colorado’s 50 Time Dealer Award winners who were inducted into the Hall of Fame are:

Russel Lyons of Boulder, Gene Markley of Fort Collins, Richard Deane of Denver, Vern Hagestad of Lakewood, Charlie Williams of Colorado Springs, Al O’Meara of Denver, Ralph Schomp of Littleton, Gene Wilcoxson of Pueblo, George McCaddon of Boulder, Tony Fortino of Pueblo, Dwight Ghent of Fort Collins, Nate Burt of Denver, Jack Maffeo of Arvada, Don Doenges of Colorado Springs, Florian Barth of Denver, Hugh Tighe Jr. of Denver, Richard Dellenbach of Fort Collins, Joe Luby of Denver, Harry Dowson of Denver, Bob Fisher of Boulder, Robert Markley of Greeley, Doug McDonald of Denver, Jim Suss Sr. of Denver, Roland Purifoy of Fort Lupton, Herrick Garnsey of Greeley, Jim Reilly Sr. of Colorado Springs, Lloyd Chavez of Denver, Fred Emich III of Denver, Kent Stevinson of Lakewood, Dean Dowson of Lakewood, John Schenden of Northglenn, Lee Payne of Golden, Jim Morehart of Durango, Jeff Carlson of Glenwood Springs, Barbara Vidmar of Pueblo, Lisa Schomp of Littleton, Don Hicks of Aurora, John Medved of Golden, Jack TerHar of Broomfield, Doug Moreland of Denver, Mike Shaw of Denver, Jay Cimino of Colorado Springs, Bob Ghent of Greeley, Scott Ehrlich of Greeley, Bob Penkhus of Colorado Springs, Bill Hellman of Delta, Todd Maul of Denver, Mary Pacifico-Valley of Denver, Fletcher Flower of Montrose, Christina Dawkins of Loveland.

5 Spradley Barr dealerships sold

Spradley Barr automotive dealerships in Greeley, Fort Collins, and Cheyenne have been sold to Ken Garff Automotive Group, based in Salt Lake City.
The dealerships include Spradley Barr Ford in Greeley, Spradley Barr Ford in Fort Collins, Spradley Barr Ford/Toyota/Hyundai in Cheyenne.
Garff also has acquired two dealerships in Arizona and two in Texas to bring the automotive group’s holdings to 62 in nine states.

The news and editorial staffs of The Denver Post had no role in this post’s preparation.

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Unsettled weekend weather with severe storms possible Sunday

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Unsettled weekend weather with severe storms possible Sunday

ST. LOUIS – Unsettled weekend weather with multiple rounds of rain and storms forecast to impact the area, including a threat for severe weather for St. Louis on Sunday.

Saturday morning into the afternoon expect scattered rain and a few rumbles of thunder mainly south of I-70 to continue spreading eastward. This activity gradually tapers off through the afternoon.

Later Saturday evening into tonight showers and storms develop across central and east central Missouri and lift north ahead of a warm front as we head into early Sunday morning. These storms could produce some hail along with heavy rain. The front stalls across northern Missouri and west central Illinois where heavy rain and storms will continue for much of the day on Sunday. Our far northern counties could be impacted by multiple waves of heavy rain through the day with amounts to around 2”.

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Annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s to raise awareness and funds for research

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Annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s to raise awareness and funds for research

ST. LOUIS – The annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s is back this year. The goal is not just to raise awareness about the disease but to also to raise funds for research.

The walk is happening at the Enterprise Center beginning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

So far, the Alzheimer’s Association has raised more than $800,000, not too far away from reaching its goal of $1.3 million.

This progressive disease affects millions of Americans. In fact, the CDC says in 2020, as many as 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease.

The number of people living with the disease doubles every 5 years beyond age 65. That number is projected to nearly triple to 14 million people by 2060.

During the walk you’ll see people carrying flowers of different colors, each color representing the person’s connection to the disease.

A purple flower is for those who have lost a someone to the disease. A yellow flower represents someone who is currently supporting or caring for a person living with Alzheimer’s.

Registration for the walk is at 7:30 a.m. There will be a ceremony at 9:15 and the walk begins at 9:30 a.m.

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‘Holy grail‘ of American folk art discovered St. Louis yard

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‘Holy grail‘ of American folk art discovered St. Louis yard

ST. LOUIS – Art historians are calling it the holy grail of a find, a rare work of art found in a St. Louis front yard. What looked like a lawn ornament is now headed to a museum in New York.   

It’s a sculpture of two sisters that sat in the front yard of a St. Louis home that’s been on quite a journey. First rediscovered in 2019 by a gentleman named John Foster, an art historian.     

For years the sculpture entitled “Martha and Mary” sat on a bench in the city of St. Louis before an art historian saw it while out on a stroll. 

“That didn’t look like the commonly seen concrete lawn ornament that we are used to seeing,” said Valerie Rousseau, senior curator American Folk Art Museum & Exhibition chair. 

Sally Bliss had inherited this Martha and Mary sculpture, and it sat outside her home in New York when she was a ballet dancer. Years later after her first husband died, she moved to St. Louis when she met her second husband, Jim Connette. 

“I had it and put it out in my garden in Long Island, which was our main house, and brought it with me and put it on the bench,” Bliss said.

“I knew it was valuable. But I knew that nobody would steal it because it looked like it was part of the bench and would be really difficult to pick up that bench and steal the whole thing.” 

This lawn sculpture was originally made by artist William Edmondson, the famed black sculptor from Nashville, Tennessee.

The ‘two sisters’ sculpture had been featured at the Museum of Modern Art in 1937 in New York and later Paris, France. 

Today, William Edmondson is considered a preeminent black sculptor, although he didn’t start sculpting until 1934 when he was 60 years old, and only made 300 sculptures over the course of 15 years. 

Using limestone from demolished buildings.  

“Like most museums, we have to have supporters to acquire such artwork,” Rousseau said. “Prices for Edmundson sculptures can be $350,000 to $800,000.”   

And after some conversations and a cleaning, Martha and Mary are headed back to New York. This time, the sculpture will be the centerpiece of the American Museum of Folk Art. Debuting this January on the celebration of the museum’s 60th year. 

Thanks to the generosity of a man named Brian Donnelly, this sculpture and its wild ride of a story will reside in the Big Apple.  

“I was sad,” Bliss said. “But I knew that this was the right place for it to go and especially to New York and so many people will see it and he will get his due and to me, that’s more important than me having to be sad because I’m losing that work of art.” 

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