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Coral Moons on the rise as indie rock band to watch

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Coral Moons on the rise as indie rock band to watch

Coral Moons singer Carly Kraft says goodbye to her childhood home on the title track of her new LP “Fieldcrest.” Kraft opens the tender track indulging in nostalgia — ruminations about raiding her parents’ liquor cabinet, campfires with friends. But midway through the track, the narrative falls away as the singer howls over and over again, “We got old.” Around her voice, the band whips up in a mighty crest of volume.

“Fieldcrest is the name of the street that I grew up on in upstate New York,” Kraft said. “It’s about me coping with my parents moving, but also about me coping with feeling like I’m late to the game as a musician in my mid-20s.”

“The ending gets a little emotional,” she continued. “I’m screaming, ‘We got old,’ and it’s pretty much a live take of the band building and building. When we listened back to it we were all just crying because it felt so real and special.”

A typical route for musicians involves graduating from hairbrushes and tennis rackets to microphones and guitars in high school or college then bars and clubs after that. Instead, Kraft went to Rochester Institute of Technology and found a programming job in Boston after college.

So how did Kraft go from writing code to fronting one of the area’s hottest bands? Like every success, skill and luck played a role. But so did boredom.

“Boredom is a great word, that describes a lot of it,” she said with a laugh. “I never pictured being at a 9-5 job. The gender inequalities that exist in the workplace were really hard on me as a female developer. It felt like I was meant for something more.”

At the time, Kraft met a ton of locals in the music scene. She also connected with bassist Manuel Camacho at the day job and the two started doing covers on instruments their boss brought to the office — guitarist Justin Bartlett and drummer Kevin O’Connell round out the band. She learned a few guitar chords, started to write and sing, and suddenly she and Coral Moons found themselves up on stage. A rock band in the most expansive sense (the quartet can do atmospheric indie, retro soul and heavy rock), Coral Moons created a buzz at a few small city clubs

Momentum built and then stalled. After just two years together, Coral Moons nabbed 2020 Boston Music Award nominations for alt/indie artist of the year and video of the year for their single “Winnebago” — the band plays a free BMA party Friday at the Green at 401 Park in Boston. But the pandemic crushed the music scene.

“We then thought, ‘Well, if we can’t play shows, let’s make a record,’” Kraft said. “It all came together in the studio and it was kind of a great moment for us. We were neglected of human connection. We were just in our spaces on our own. Coming together, we were so inspired to see each other and play music again.”

Maybe relief and joy elicited some of those studio tears. But honestly, it’s hard not to get choked up at how great “Fieldcrest” sounds. Produced by Sam Kassirer at his studio Great North Sound Society in rural Maine, the record has the dynamic and earthy feel of many of Kassirer’s past projects (see records by Lake Street Dive, David Wax Museum, Kingsley Flood).

Now, with gigs on the calendar and an armful of new songs ready for LP No. 2, Coral Moons feel it’s time to pick up where they left off.

“The album feels so big and special but we also just did a three week tour of it and we just want time to celebrate but there’s no time because we got to record our next project,” Kraft said with a laugh.


For music and details, go to coralmoons.com.

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5 Colorado spas that offer everything from soaks in beer to Himalayan salt room saunas

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5 Colorado spas that offer everything from soaks in beer to Himalayan salt room saunas

Take a tour of The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park and you’ll hear about how Freelan Oscar Stanley – a hotelier and, more famously, inventor of the Yankee steam-powered car – originally came to Colorado on doctor’s orders. Stricken with tuberculosis, Stanley arrived here at the start of the 20th century with optimism that the fresh and dry air, high altitude and ample sunshine would heal him.

Stanley, who survived TB, was just one of many “lungers” who migrated to Colorado seeking a cure. Others who moved here believed the burbling hot springs had healing powers that could treat a variety of ailments. In all, state historians estimate as many as one-third of Colorado’s early settlers moved to the Centennial State for reasons associated with health.

“More came to Colorado for their health than for silver or gold,” says Tom Noel, a state historian who is known as “Dr. Colorado.”

That is to say wellness has deep roots in the state. Several historic destinations and landmarks, including The Broadmoor Hotel and Resort in Colorado Springs and the Colorado Chautauqua in Boulder, were founded as health retreats. Today, the many hot springs and spas, overall active lifestyle, crisp mountain air, and many days of sunshine (and the list goes on) continue to appeal to residents and visitors alike.

After an especially tough year and a half, Colorado’s wellness destinations are seeing an increase in people who want a restorative vacation, whether for a day or a week. Guests are seeking out “travel therapy,” says James Gibson, president of Garden of the Gods Resort and Club, which has a front row seat to the scenic Garden of the Gods Park in Colorado Springs. The resort is home to the STRATA Integrated Wellness and Spa, where Western and Eastern medical science coexist on its treatment menu.

“We are extraordinarily grateful for the power of place here at Garden of the Gods Resort and Club,” Gibson says. The sandstone rock formations that jut into the blue skies, he says, instantly evoke feelings of tranquility and ease.

From sudsy soaks at a beer spa in Denver to pampering “done right” at one of the original spas in the West, here are five ways to experience wellness travel in a state that helped invent it.

Provided by The Broadmoor

The Broadmoor Spa offers a steam room, sauna, aromatherapy room and lounge that are gender specific as well as coed lounge areas that are complimentary with scheduled spa treatment services. Also available are a fitness center, indoor pool and outdoor whirlpool.

The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs

When this luxury resort opened in 1918, it had one of the first spas in the country with dedicated space for both men and women. At the time, guests were advised to dress in their rooms and take the service elevator directly to the baths in The Broadmoor’s “thermo hydrotherapeutic department” (aka spa). A half-hour massage cost a buck and visitors paid $1.50 for a Turkish bath and steam room visit, according to Krista Heinicke, public relations manager and resident historian.

The Broadmoor’s world-traveling founders, Spencer and Julie Penrose, wanted health and wellness to be a centerpiece experience at their resort, where European opulence meets rugged outdoor adventures. Today, guests can fill their itineraries with hiking, rock climbing, mountain biking and stand-up paddleboarding excursions. Coinciding with the reopening of The Broadmoor Manitou and Pikes Peak Cog Railway, new fitness options include hiking to the top of Pikes Peak and taking the train down, or taking the train to the top of Pikes Peak and biking down the twisting Pikes Peak Highway.

The resort’s renown spa offers traditional treatments such as deep tissue massages and facials as well as more inventive options. The Wine Down package ($445) incorporates grape seed extract and comes with a chardonnay sugar scrub, massage, manicure and pedicure.

The Broadmoor, 1 Lake Ave., Colorado Springs, 800-755-5011, broadmoor.com

1639052821 309 5 Colorado spas that offer everything from soaks in beer

Hyoung Chang, The Denver Post

The therapy room of The Beer Spa in Denver. Customers soak in a cedar hydrotherapy tub filled with a meticulously crafted blend of hops, barley, and herbs.

The Beer Spa in Denver

After becoming intrigued by a beer spa in Poland, husband-and-wife duo Damien Zouaoui and Jessica French decided to open a similar concept in the United States. They zeroed in on Denver because of the city’s robust craft beer scene and Colorado’s health-consciousness creds.

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“Moulin Rouge! The Musical,” “To Kill a Mockingbird” on sale Friday; “Hamilton” tickets still available

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“Moulin Rouge! The Musical,” “To Kill a Mockingbird” on sale Friday; “Hamilton” tickets still available

Long-delayed and firmly on the 2022 calendar, tickets for touring Broadway productions such as Aaron Sorkin’s Tony-winning “Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird,” as well as “Moulin Rouge! The Musical,” “Hadestown,” “Mean Girls,” “Pretty Woman” and more, are finally on sale this week.

The shows, taking place at the Buell Theatre in the Denver Performing Arts Complex, are part of a Broadway touring slate that goes public at 10 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 10, via denvercenter.org. Most tickets start at $35 and run up to $145. All tickets will be distributed electronically.

In the case of high-demand shows that are currently on sale, such as “Hamilton” (Feb. 16-March 27, 2022) tickets are still available and currently priced from $59 to $500. Most dates that The Denver Post surveyed this week appeared to have at least one seat still available, if not a dozen-plus. Most are in the “premium Golden Circle” category, meaning $500 per pop.

Most of the other shows going on sale Friday had been rescheduled multiple times due to venue closures and COVID-19 mandates last year, and some of the new dates run into 2023. Even with coronavirus variants still active, Denver’s own rising vaccination rates and strict protocols at indoor cultural venues — vaccination or negative COVID-test proof, as well as enforced masks — have helped coax touring Broadway shows out of their long hibernation.

Local Broadway producer Denver Center for the Performing Arts in October also instituted its own strict protocols.

“This holiday season is vastly different from this time last year at the DCPA,” said Lisa Mallory, DCPA’s vice president of marketing and sales, in a press statement. “We truly appreciate the community as we all continue to do our part to safely return to the things we love and hope you will consider giving the gift of theatre this holiday season.”

As with most cultural nonprofits, DCPA could sorely use the revenue in a season that’s typically their most profitable. But despite layoffs, furloughs, cancellations and postponements, DCPA has been able to bring back most of its pre-pandemic staff, leaders have said, and successfully re-launched its Broadway season last week with the return of “The Lion King.”

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Snow Days at Children’s Museum, Vail’s Powabunga, sensory-friendly holiday shows and more things to do in Denver this weekend

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Snow Days at Children’s Museum, Vail’s Powabunga, sensory-friendly holiday shows and more things to do in Denver this weekend

Go big — or small — with live music

Through Sunday. Denver rock band Wildermiss seems perpetually on the edge of breaking through nationally, although we’re happy to have them all to ourselves for now. The propulsive indie act headlines Englewood’s Gothic Theatre on Friday, Dec. 10, with tickets at $20-$22. The all-ages show with excellent local openers Kiltro and Big Dopes starts at 8 p.m. at 3263 Broadway. gothictheatre.com or axs.com

Also this weekend: Vail’s Powabunga festival, which arrives just in time for this week’s high-country snow dump. The pricey, dance-friendly event, which started Thursday, Dec. 9 and runs through Sunday, Dec. 12, includes performances from Rüfüs Du Sol, Bob Moses, Vintage Culture, Elderbrook, Channel Tres and more. GA tickets for single days are $225, while a weekend pass is $319. Various times, main festival at Ford Park in Vail. powabungafestival.com. — John Wenzel

Snow Days at Children’s Museum

Through February 2022. The latest offering at Denver Children’s Museum at Marsico Campus may be its most audience-friendly yet. The winter-themed Snow Days, which began Dec. 8 and run through Feb. 27, 2022, are held outside at the museum’s Joy Park and in the shadow of its Adventure Forest play structure.

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