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Sunday Bulletin Board: ‘Are you out of your mind? You can get perfectly good chicken at the grocery store.’

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High school football: Ninth-ranked Woodbury rolls past Eagan 48-15

Our poultry, our ‘friends,’ ourselves

DEBK of Rosemount writes: “Chicken-butchering of 2021 has just concluded with Taxman’s stuffing the last of this year’s roosters into the freezer. Thus ends an effort that each August or September consumes a full week of our lives and moves me precipitously — though temporarily — toward vegetarianism. And friendlessness, too, as it happens.

“My women friends are a talented, hard-working, generous bunch, but every year when I mention that Taxman’s hatchet has been sharpened, they abandon me unceremoniously. Those who have experience in chicken-butchery are especially apt to be occupied with unspecified ‘other things’ during my hour of need. Euterpe, however, who is professionally trained in the wielding of knives (for culinary purposes) and whose Christianity ought to impel her to come to my aid, avoids all polite pretense. Her blunt refusal cuts to the quick, an injury aggravated by her calling into question my sanity and reminding me that ‘you can get perfectly good chicken in the grocery store.’

“She’s right on both counts. And every year as I’m elbow-deep in feathers and guts, I swear off raising our own ‘broilers,’ as we chicken people call the roosters we raise for eating. Alas, chicken-butchering is like child-bearing: A woman forgets how awful it is. No matter how ghastly the butchering season, by the time Stromberg’s spring chicken catalog arrives in the mail, I’m eager to place my order for Red Rangers.

“Maybe not in 2022, though. Oh, I’ll order broilers — but perhaps not my long-favored Red Rangers. This year, as we began the grisly harvest, I reported to Taxman that our birds seemed to be taking on traits of the Cornish Cross, the wildly popular breed chosen by real (as opposed to pretend) farmers and commercial chicken producers. Taxman concurred, noting that this year’s crop of Red Rangers had quickly attained the size and contours of young turkeys, eating us into the financial abyss as they did so. Moreover, the remarkable development of their foreparts (‘breasts,’ to us chicken folks) had rendered the young roosters almost immobile, the very trait that causes us to eschew the aforementioned Cornish Cross. Taxman and I like our free-range flock to be capable of ranging freely — or as far as Hamish, the resident border collie, will allow. Anyway, according to Taxman, only one of this year’s entire batch of broilers managed to hop over the fence into the laying hens’ pen, there to inaugurate a new breed, the Red Ranger/Speckled Sussex hybrid.”

Then & Now

And: In memoriam

CHRIS, “formerly of Falcon Heights, now from Beautiful White Bear Lake,” reported, on September 10: “Being a golfer, I love commemorative golf pins. I ordered this one early in September 2001. It arrived a week after the Twin Towers went down on September 11th.

“When I opened the package, I just stared at it in disbelief. It so upset me that from that day, it was in a box in the bottom of my dresser drawer — until today. I have an 8:30 tee time, and for the first time in 20 years, I am wearing it and remembering all the brave souls lost that day.”

And now KATHY S. of St. Paul: “Subject: A phone booth in New York where people talked to those lost on 9/11.

“NPR has a video online called ‘They Lost Loved Ones In 9/11. We Invited Them To Leave A Voicemail In Their Memory.’ It shows people who walked up to a phone booth where they talked to people they lost on 9/11.

“I saw how vivid their life-long pain is. But what I noticed most is guys who were willing to cry and express emotions on camera. I remember when Ed Muskie’s 1972 campaign to be the U.S. President was destroyed when (it was said) he cried while replying to a political dirty trick. A (guy) President was not allowed to show weakness, let alone tears, back then.

“As a fan of counseling and facing problems, I figure we have come a long way since 1972. And since 9/11.”

Live and learn

Or: One for the books

RED’S OFFSPRING, north of St. Paul, writes: “Subject: Lessons learned.

“In talking with my grandson Sam, I learned that biology is one of his sophomore classes. Hearing ‘biology,’ I was reminded of my high-school biology course at Cretin (many years prior to Cretin-Derham Hall).

“The teacher was Christian Brother Anthony. My memory flashed back to two classroom incidents that have stayed with me all these years.

“Incident one: On the first day of class, Brother told us to write our names on a sheet of paper, put ‘JMJ’ (‘Jesus, Mary, Joseph’) beneath our names, and write ‘Biology’ on the top line, in the center of the paper.

“I don’t recall what else we wrote before he collected the papers.

“He stood at the front of the room with our papers in his hand. He proceeded to fold each paper in half from top to bottom. He deposited most of the papers in the basket, while we wondered what he was doing.

“As he stood in front of us, holding just a few papers, he said: ‘I told you to write “Biology” in the “center” of the paper.’

“He didn’t give us a lecture about following directions. He didn’t need to. We got the message.

“Incident two: On the day of our first test, Brother passed out a blue book and a sheet with numerous paragraphs on it. The assignment was to find false information in the paragraphs and write corrections in the blue books. I have no recollection of how much I wrote.

“Lunch followed biology, and as we left, Brother announced: ‘I hope you wrote a lot, because all the information in the paragraphs was incorrect.’

“We could hardly wait to get to the lunchroom to tell our classmates what we’d found out about the test!

“As the next class was leaving Biology, Brother Anthony informed them they should have left the blue books blank, because everything in the paragraphs was true.

“There are some educational experiences you don’t forget.”

Live and learn

BIG EEK of Southeast Minneapolis: “When I was a prospective high-school teacher, the college arranged for each of us to spend two weeks in a nearby small town at the end of spring term, to get some practical experience. Another fellow and I went to W., 80 miles east of the city. As a math major, I shadowed Mr. B., who taught all the math in the school on the outskirts of town. I watched him at his job, and he assigned me lessons to prepare and teach.

“On Thursday, he rushed up to me before his first-period Algebra class. He had given the students all the odd-numbered problems in the new textbook they were using, to do for homework. Number 17 was a monster. It was full of parentheses within square brackets within curlicues. I advised him to start in the middle and work his way out from there.

“Sure enough, the captain of the football team asked him how to do Number 17. Mr. B. put the problem on the blackboard and started in on it. Halfway through, he glanced at me at the back of the room, and I gave him a slight nod. His final answer was 32. Answers to the odd numbers were given in the back of the book.

“Mr. B. pointed to the football player and asked him what the answer was in the back of the book. ‘Thirty-two,’ said the football player. ‘See,’ Mr. B said confidently to the class, ‘you just start in the middle and work your way to the outside.’

“At noon, Mr. B thanked me and treated me to lunch at the school cafeteria. After school, I was walking to my room in the middle of town. Three of the 12th-grade girls walked along with me. The only three options for lunch were to bring a bag, or eat at the Chinese restaurant in town (every town had a Chinese restaurant) or the cafeteria.

“One of the girls asked me where I had eaten. ‘At the cafeteria,’ I said. ‘Ugh,’ she said, making a face. ‘You must have a death wish.’ Lunch had been something I had never eaten before, or since. I think it was called Shepherd’s Pie. It was . . . interesting.”

Now & Then

MARY LOUISE OLSON of Hudson, Wis.: “Subject: A classmate reunion.

“The idea of classmates’ from kindergarten through high-school graduation being together once again seemed like just a ‘pipe dream.’ But it could happen, and it did! On July 9, 2021, six of us were at the steps of OUR school (1941-1953). Some family members were there as well, and smiles with greetings were everywhere. A current Spring Valley, Wisconsin, school staff member met and escorted us to the room where it all began. Absent was the fireplace that we as kindergartners thought was very special. Now the building is coming down, and evidence of destruction was the present-day condition of the classroom.

“One classmate brought the report card that was used by our teacher, Miss Henrietta Wessels. It didn’t seem particularly outdated, because our ‘mental habits,’ ‘physical characteristics,’ and ‘social attitudes’ were evaluated by the teacher. We had projects like ‘our pets,’ ‘good manners,’ ‘home and family,’ ‘birds,’ ‘health,’ ‘seeds on plants and trees,’ and ‘gardening.’ Obviously, the school year was filled with real learning. Considering that a war was being fought, with local folks in harm’s way, and a major Spring Valley flood occurred in September of 1941, reality did inflict learning in our class.

“As the remaining six class members, we mentioned the names and recalled memories of classmates no longer with us. A poem that had been taught was recited. We had all learned to play a tonette, and soon we heard one played; a song was sung from memory. We remembered to recite the Pledge of Allegiance, albeit as we learned it in 1941, minus the added line known today.

“What a blessing! The six of us could look back and smile at one another with an appreciation of long lives and positive learning from the start, thanks to our community of Spring Valley. Wisconsin.”

Everyone’s a (restaurant) critic!

THE DORYMAN of Prescott, Wis.: “Subject: Restau-rant review (channeling Andy Rooney).

“I like a good sandwich. I have several favorites. A Reuben with grated horseradish is probably number one, and egg salad is not too far behind. I get Patty Melts when I can, and Philly Cheesesteaks are always welcome. While a delicious sandwich is a first choice ‘lunch-out’ menu choice for me, I am always wary of the physical demands that usually follow that selection. Apparently if it is composed (and shaped) smaller than a properly inflated, regulation, bisected, NFL football, most restaurants think I will be disappointed. The bread, on the other hand (pun intended), is glowingly described in the menu but rather inconsequential when delivered. Any exotic taste, texture or artisan preparation is usually lost on the bottom slice because of the ‘fall-apart’ sauce for my added enjoyment. If you even attempt to pick it up (which I always think is the whole point of the thing), it takes both hands, and if it holds together during elevation, the first bite usually distributes the fillings everywhere but in your mouth. Am I the only one (ahem, BB) who would willingly pay $14 for a sandwich that has the good old-fashioned, sensible, fit-in-your-mouth ingredients ‘sandwiched’ (get it, Chef?) between two slices of good old-fashioned unsoaked bread . . . and not leave $4 worth of groceries on the table and my shirt? Plus, I don’t want to take the other half home; I had it for lunch! A first-world problem, I know, but hey, I loved my mother’s sandwiches, where less was always more.”

This ’n’ that ’n’ the other ’n’ the other ’n’ the other

All from AL B of Hartland: (1) “As a tour leader, I took many group photos. There are the magic words, words with weight, used to make one smile: I’d say ‘Prunes,’ ‘Say cheese,’ ‘Smile,’ ‘Smile, you’re on “Candid Camera,”‘ ‘Whiskey,’ ‘Lottery winners,’ ‘Cabbageheads’ and ‘Duck snort.’ A duck snort is a softly hit ball that goes over the infield and lands in the outfield for a hit. Chicago White Sox announcer Ken ‘Hawk’ Harrelson popularized the term.”

(2) “A bug zapper participates in an indiscriminate slaughter of insects, many of them beneficial. A University of Delaware study found that 0.22 percent of the kills were biting insects. Research showed that your chances of being bitten by a mosquito increase when you are near a bug zapper. The light is attractive, and so are you.”

(3) “My wife and I walked the county fair. We strolled by the onion-rings stand. We knew from experience those rings were tasty. Their aroma was inviting. ‘Those onion rings smell great,’ said my wife. I love my wife, so we walked past the stand again.”

(4) “This is the time of the year when I think of family reunions. I remember when I had a full roster of aunts. We had a pie table at reunions in those years. Woe be to anyone who brought a store-bought pie. Those good women believed in being fruitful and multi-pied.”

(5) “I’ve learned . . . the inventor of the doorbell didn’t own a Chihuahua.”

Band Name of the Day: The Chicken People — or: The Duck Snorts

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Five things we learned from the Ravens’ 41-17 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals

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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

The Ravens had their worst performance of the season in a lopsided 41-17 home loss to the Cincinnati Bengals. Here are five things we learned Sunday afternoon:

The Ravens cannot dwell on a humiliating defeat any more than they did on a proud victory.

The Ravens entered with a 5-1 record built on one-score victories and a single blowout. They exited as victims of a pummeling that sent them into their bye week facing serious questions about their status as an AFC contender.

We’re talking about what happened Sunday, right? Well, yes, but we could also be describing the events of Oct. 21, 2012, when the Ravens fell, 43-13, to the Houston Texans. That story ended 3 ½ months later in New Orleans, with Joe Flacco clutching a Super Bowl Most Valuable Player award.

This is not to say the Ravens are destined to win the Super Bowl because they ate a blowout in Week 7. It’s just to say that one week is one week in the NFL. It’s not unusual for an eventual champion to be embarrassed on a given Sunday. Need more recent evidence? The Tampa Bay Buccaneers fell, 38-3, to the New Orleans Saints in Week 9 last season.

This was not a disqualifying loss for the Ravens any more than their 34-6 blowout of the Los Angeles Chargers, just seven days earlier, was a certification of their AFC preeminence.

“It’s always week to week; it’s always game to game,” coach John Harbaugh said. “There never is any running narrative, it just doesn’t exist.”

Please don’t read this as an excuse for the Ravens’ performance. They tackled and covered poorly against a talented, hungry opponent that was eager to pounce on every mistake. They did not run the ball with any consistency against a defense that yielded 404 rushing yards to them in Week 17 of last season. Quarterback Lamar Jackson waited too long for plays to develop and took five sacks as a result. They were much the lesser team on their home field in an early battle for AFC North supremacy.

“This one’s going to burn a little bit,” defensive end Calais Campbell said, and you could hear from his humbled tone that he meant it.

There’s only so much use in self-flagellation, however. The Ravens, under Harbaugh, have always done a good job of treating each week as a discrete problem. Seasons rarely get away from them, and there is no reason to think this one will.

“We can’t really treat a bad loss any different than a win,” said cornerback Marlon Humphrey after one of the worst individual performances of his career. “This bye week helps us because we can kind of study into it a little bit more than usual. But you look at it, you fix your problems. You’ll probably take this one [for] two or three days, and then you kind of flush it, and you move on.”

Fans won’t take comfort from such answers, which border on cliché. But there’s a reason successful players and teams learn to think this way. What else is there but next week?

All of the Ravens’ flaws resurfaced.

The completeness of their triumph over the Chargers wiped our memories of the first five weeks a little too quickly. Yes, they found ways to win those earlier games, but they did so in spite of shoddy tackling, a declining ground game and flimsy pass defense.

All of these old enemies showed up at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday.

The Ravens actually started well on defense, pressuring Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow into an inaccurate first quarter and keeping rookie wide receiver Ja’Marr Chase off the stat sheet. Then, Cincinnati tight end C.J. Uzomah left Humphrey sucking dust on a 55-yard touchdown catch in the second quarter, and the troubles followed.

This was the rare game in which Humphrey was not the best Ravens cornerback on the field. In the two-minute drill before halftime, he let Chase get away from him on a crossing route; Chase not only picked up 26 yards, he made it all the way to the sideline to stop the clock. Cincinnati capitalized with a field goal to go up 13-10.

Uzomah scored again on the Bengals’ first drive of the second half after Ravens safety Chuck Clark abandoned him in hopes of jumping a sideline route. To make matters worse, DeShon Elliott missed a tackle on the 32-yard catch and run.

The afternoon reached its nadir a few minutes later when Chase beat Humphrey on a quick third-down route and wiggled out of the cornerback’s grasp on his way to an 82-yard touchdown that put the Bengals up 27-17. Humphrey briefly reopened the window for his team with an interception in the end zone at the start of the fourth quarter, but the Ravens went just 18 yards on their ensuing drive, and that was that.

“I lost that matchup, so a lot of it … is on me,” Humphrey said of his showdown with Chase.

Outside linebacker Tyus Bowser offered a broader and simpler epitaph: “We would have been OK if we had just tackled.”

Burrow finished with 416 passing yards, Chase with 201 receiving yards. Their gaudy statistical lines echoed those surrendered by the Ravens in earlier games against the Raiders, Chiefs and Colts.

“Up and down,” Campbell said of the defense. “Hot and cold. Not very consistent yet.”

The Ravens could have made life easier for their defense if they had seized the initiative on offense like they did the week before. But they are no longer capable of playing bully ball against quality resistance. It’s telling that their best running performances of the season have come against defensive horror shows such as the Chiefs and the Chargers. Jackson (12 carries, 88 yards) was their only effective runner against the Bengals, and he took significant punishment as he tried to scramble his team out of trouble. The Ravens got 29 yards on 11 carries from their running backs; it’s hard to imagine such totals if they were working with J.K. Dobbins and Gus Edwards instead of faded stars Devonta Freeman and Le’Veon Bell.

Jackson made some terrific downfield throws, but he also held the ball too long as he waited for chunk plays to develop, perhaps lacking faith that the Ravens could mount long drives built on more modest bites. They managed just one scoring drive longer than four minutes, meaning they never played the game on their terms.

The Bengals announced themselves as a legitimate threat to take the AFC North.

We can list the Ravens’ flaws on a never-ending crawl for the next two weeks, but the fact is they might have gotten away with their subpar performance against the 2020 Bengals. This was a more formidable foe that spent the week uttering confident words and backed them up with confident play.

Burrow knew he would face pressure, and he missed on eight of his first 13 attempts as Ravens outside linebacker Justin Houston lived in the Cincinnati backfield. The former No. 1 overall pick did not shrink from the difficulty, however. He made correct reads and accurate throws with defenders in his face, and his receivers turned quick strikes into touchdowns of 55, 32 and 82 yards (49.4% of his passing yards came after the catch, according to Pro Football Focus). The Ravens opened the door with missed tackles and poor communications. Burrow and the Bengals sprinted through it.

“This might have been his best game as a pro,” Campbell said of Burrow. “We made it hard on him early, and he made some adjustments and did what he had to do. You have to tip your hat off to him. His playmakers made plays for him, too. That team is talented.”

On the other side, the Bengals made it clear their 26th ranked defense from 2020 is a relic of the past. They covered well enough downfield to give their pass rushers, Sam Hubbard and Trey Hendrickson, time to reach Jackson, and they ate the Ravens alive at the line of scrimmage. They have stars at all three layers.

Based on seven weeks of evidence, nothing about the Bengals screams fluke. Their defense is the best in the AFC North (yes, they have outplayed the Steelers). Burrow and Chase are gifted enough to punish any opponent. Their self-belief is growing. Remember, Jackson and the Ravens took off faster than anyone expected in 2019. Could this blowout be tinder for the Bengals?

“I think it was a big statement,” Burrow said.

The Ravens cannot afford to lose Patrick Mekari.

Harbaugh offered no postgame update on his right tackle, who left the game with an ankle injury before halftime.

The Ravens had spent the first six weeks playing catch-up on the offensive line after Ronnie Stanley went down with an ankle injury that turned out to be season-ending. Mekari’s play on the right side was a legitimate bright spot in that effort. He came in with the second-best pass-blocking grade among the team’s starting linemen, according to Pro Football Focus, and Harbaugh has praised him unreservedly.

The Ravens love Mekari for his willingness to step into any breach. With him excelling at right tackle and Alejandro Villanueva looking more comfortable at his familiar spot on the left, the loss of Stanley felt less catastrophic than it probably should have.

Mekari’s injury might turn out to be minor, and it came at the right time, with the Ravens going into their bye week. But it reminded us how thin they really are at tackle. Tyre Phillips, who has rarely excelled as a pass blocker on the outside, stepped in for Mekari, and Cincinnati’s best pass rushers, Hubbard and Hendrickson, rolled up pressures against him and Villanueva. Practice-squad call-up David Sharpe was one more turned ankle from playing significant snaps.

Do not be surprised if Ravens general manager Eric DeCosta tries to pick up a tackle before the Nov. 2 trade deadline, though the leaguewide supply is thin.

Even in a bad loss, we saw evidence the Ravens have found the right formula at inside linebacker.

It was just Patrick Queen’s luck that he played one of the better games of his career in an ugly performance for the defense.

The Ravens stuck to their plan from the Chargers game, using the second-year linebacker as a complement to veteran Josh Bynes. Queen played 27 defensive snaps and earned the highest grade of any Ravens defender, according to Pro Football Focus. Early in the game, he moved decisively to fill a gap and dropped Bengals running back Joe Mixon for a loss. The 2020 first-round pick avoided the glaring mistakes that haunted many of his teammates.

Bynes also played well, contributing six tackles as the Ravens held Mixon (12 carries, 59 yards) in check for most of the game.

The Ravens trust Bynes to bring order to the middle of their defense, and they hope Queen will rebuild his confidence and run free to the ball playing the WILL spot. This wasn’t the scenario they envisioned heading into Week 1, but it’s a logical attempt at trying to make the best of a disappointing start to Queen’s career.

Week 9

[email protected]

Nov. 7, 1 p.m.

TV: Chs. 45, 5

Radio: 97.9 FM, 1090 AM

©2021 Baltimore Sun. Visit baltimoresun.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Ravens coach John Harbaugh on defense’s ‘biggest problem,’ Patrick Mekari’s ankle injury and more | NOTES

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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

The Ravens’ biggest problem on defense this season hasn’t changed. If they can’t tackle, they can’t succeed.

Tackling woes again plagued the Ravens in their 41-17 loss Sunday to the Bengals, with Cincinnati quarterback Joe Burrow amassing nearly half of his career-high 416 passing yards after the catch, according to Pro Football Focus. Running backs Joe Mixon and Samaje Perine also ripped off fourth-quarter touchdowns against a defense that couldn’t bring them down.

As the Ravens enter their bye week on a low note, their defensive fundamentals are under the microscope. That has been the case seemingly all season, even after spirited wins.

“The biggest problem we have on defense right now, in terms of big plays, is not getting guys on the ground, whether it’s been underneath slant routes or screen routes or, in one case, we got the screen-and-go,” coach John Harbaugh said Monday, referring to Bengals tight end C.J. Uzomah’s 32-yard catch-and-run touchdown in the third quarter Sunday when he slipped past safety DeShon Elliott in the open field.

When the Ravens return in Week 9 for their home game against the Minnesota Vikings, there will be little letup for the defense. Running back Dalvin Cook averaged a broken tackle every 9.5 carries last season, according to Pro Football Reference, though his elusiveness has slipped this season. Wide receiver Justin Jefferson, who starred alongside Bengals rookie Ja’Marr Chase at LSU, is ninth in the NFL with 542 receiving yards.

“Until we get [tackling] fixed, we’ll be a very mediocre defense, generally speaking,” Harbaugh said. “Our guys understand that. … When we play really good defense, we’re tackling. And that’s got to get done. And there’s a lot of reasons for that. Sometimes they’re not pushing to the right zone, so there’s more space in there than there should be. Other times, we take a bad angle. Sometimes a guy’s not covered.

“There’s different reasons for it, but the results are uniformly not good. And you’re a consistent, good defense when you consistently do all the little things well. And when we start doing all the little things well, then we’re going to be a better defense.”

Mekari hurting

Harbaugh declined to comment on right tackle Patrick Mekari’s condition, saying only that he has an ankle injury. The NFL Network reported Monday that Mekari, who was hurt in the second quarter, suffered a high-ankle sprain and is “seeking more feedback.” High-ankle sprains generally take at least a month to recover from.

Mekari is the Ravens’ highest-rated tackle, according to PFF, and played every offensive snap from Week 2, when he took over after Alejandro Villanueva moved to left tackle, to Week 6. Harbaugh said last week that he “couldn’t ask for a better player there [at right tackle] right now.”

With Ronnie Stanley (ankle) sidelined for the season, the team will likely turn once more to Tyre Phillips, who started at left guard in Week 1 before suffering a minor knee injury. He replaced Mekari on Sunday and struggled against Cincinnati’s pass rush.

“We’ll just see where it goes,” Harbaugh said of Mekari’s injury.

Extra points

  • Harbaugh called the Ravens’ performance Sunday “our worst game of the season, worst game in a long time.” But he stressed that the team is not even at the midpoint of a long season. “We’ve got 10 games left,” he said. “We need to keep growing as a football team and building on what we’ve done and what we haven’t done and make the strongest run we can for the next 10 weeks, and that’s what we’re planning on doing.”
  • After Ravens running backs combined for 29 rushing yards on 11 carries Sunday, Harbaugh was asked about the position’s struggles on the ground. “We just have to block better, scheme better, run better,” he said. “There are specifics in there in terms of schemes, and every play stands on its own. But we can’t go through all — how many run plays have we had this year that haven’t been successful? You can go through every one of them and you get the specific answer.”
  • Defensive lineman Derek Wolfe (hip/back) is “very close” to returning to practice, Harbaugh said. Wolfe has yet to play this season after suffering an injury in training camp. “This week, next week, hopefully, and we’ll see,” he said.

©2021 Baltimore Sun. Visit baltimoresun.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Patriots-Chargers injury report: Devin McCourty not listed, 15 limited Wednesday

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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

Oct. 28—The Patriots listed 15 players on their initial practice report Wednesday — and that meant good news in New England.

Why?

Veteran safety Devin McCourty, who missed the second half of last Sunday’s game with an abdomen injury, was not listed. As a full participant in Wednesday’s padded practice, McCourty should be expected to play this weekend at the Chargers.

None of his teammates were absent Wednesday, including rookie corner Shaun Wade, who had missed the last three weeks with a concussion. Pats linebacker Dont’a Hightower has also recovered from the hurt elbow that contributed to him missing Sunday’s win over the Jets. He’s now only limited because of an ankle injury.

The Patriots’ complete injury report is below. The Chargers’ will be released later Wednesday evening.

Limited

C David Andrews (ankle)

LB Ja’Whaun Bentley (ribs)

WR Kendrick Bourne (shoulder)

DT Carl Davis (hand)

S Kyle Dugger (neck)

K Nick Folk (left knee)

DT Davon Godchaux (finger)

LB Dont’a Hightower (ankle)

LB Brandon King (thigh)

G Shaq Mason (abdomen)

TE Jonnu Smith (shoulder)

LB Josh Uche (shoulder)

LB Kyle Van Noy (groin)

CB Shaun Wade (concussion)

DE Deatrich Wise (knee)

(c)2021 the Boston Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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