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Vikings linebacker Nick Vigil shows new team a little something special

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Vikings linebacker Nick Vigil shows new team a little something special

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Linebacker Nick Vigil was a two-way player at Utah State, and he looked the part Sunday.

Vigil, a 28-year-old linebacker in his first season with the Vikings, returned an interception 38 yards for a touchdown on the second play of the second half to give the Vikings a 30-24 lead, but it was the execution that brought out the athleticism.

Vigil extended his arms like a wide receiver to grab the pass from Kyler Murray on the left side of the defense, then demonstrated his ability to escape on the way to his first career touchdown in the NFL.

After stiff-arming speedster Rondale Moore at the 20, Vigil slithered past guard Josh Jones to get into the end zone before rolling to a finish.

Nothing, really.

“Just dropped to my spot, read (Murray’s) eyes,” Vigil said. “He was staring it down, so I was able to break on it and catch the ball. I thought (Moore) was gonna get me from behind. That guy’s a little faster than me, so he caught me pretty quick, but I was able to escape him.

“Ahh… I don’t know if you can say ‘due,’ but it felt good to finally get one.”

Vikings cornerback Patrick Peterson, a former Cardinals player who knows something about State Farm Stadium, was dropping into his zone and did not see the play develop, but the crowd reaction tipped him off.

“I just heard the crowd kind of take a gasp for air, so I knew we had to do something good,” said Peterson, who spent his first 10 pro seasons with Cardinals.

“I looked up on the big screen and Nick was going the other way with the football.”

Vigil also joined the Vikings’ defense as a free agent this season after playing his first four years with Cincinnati then joining with the Chargers in 2020. He signed a one-year, $1.75 million contract in March.

“Nick has been phenomenal for us since he got here in OTAs, throughout minicamps, and he’s been making plays for us thus far throughout the season,” Peterson said.

Principally a linebacker at Utah State, Vigil also spent time as a running back, and had 169 yards rushing and four touchdowns.

Vigil also was involved in a disputed play late in the first half, when he came up with a fumble that was disallowed after review.

On second down from the Vikings’ 5-yard line, Moore ran a jet sweep over the right side and lost the ball when cornerback Bashaud Breeland popped the ball loose on a tackle.

The ball popped into Vigil’s hands, but a review indicated that he did not have both feet in bounds after gaining possession, and the Cardinals retained possession.

“No, just kinda popped into my chest,” Vigil said. “I was joking with guys on the sidelines (that) I gotta start working on my toe-taps. Get two feet down.”

A.J. Green was called for holding on that play to move the ball back, but Murray scored on a designed quarterback keeper up the middle on the next play, following center Rodney Hudson.

“They had a good play called,” Vigil said. “In that situation, there’s not much you can do. We’ve just got to see it a little faster and all rally to it before he gets in.”

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‘Holy grail‘ of American folk art discovered St. Louis yard

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‘Holy grail‘ of American folk art discovered St. Louis yard

ST. LOUIS – Art historians are calling it the holy grail of a find, a rare work of art found in a St. Louis front yard. What looked like a lawn ornament is now headed to a museum in New York.   

It’s a sculpture of two sisters that sat in the front yard of a St. Louis home that’s been on quite a journey. First rediscovered in 2019 by a gentleman named John Foster, an art historian.     

For years the sculpture entitled “Martha and Mary” sat on a bench in the city of St. Louis before an art historian saw it while out on a stroll. 

“That didn’t look like the commonly seen concrete lawn ornament that we are used to seeing,” said Valerie Rousseau, senior curator American Folk Art Museum & Exhibition chair. 

Sally Bliss had inherited this Martha and Mary sculpture, and it sat outside her home in New York when she was a ballet dancer. Years later after her first husband died, she moved to St. Louis when she met her second husband, Jim Connette. 

“I had it and put it out in my garden in Long Island, which was our main house, and brought it with me and put it on the bench,” Bliss said.

“I knew it was valuable. But I knew that nobody would steal it because it looked like it was part of the bench and would be really difficult to pick up that bench and steal the whole thing.” 

This lawn sculpture was originally made by artist William Edmondson, the famed black sculptor from Nashville, Tennessee.

The ‘two sisters’ sculpture had been featured at the Museum of Modern Art in 1937 in New York and later Paris, France. 

Today, William Edmondson is considered a preeminent black sculptor, although he didn’t start sculpting until 1934 when he was 60 years old, and only made 300 sculptures over the course of 15 years. 

Using limestone from demolished buildings.  

“Like most museums, we have to have supporters to acquire such artwork,” Rousseau said. “Prices for Edmundson sculptures can be $350,000 to $800,000.”   

And after some conversations and a cleaning, Martha and Mary are headed back to New York. This time, the sculpture will be the centerpiece of the American Museum of Folk Art. Debuting this January on the celebration of the museum’s 60th year. 

Thanks to the generosity of a man named Brian Donnelly, this sculpture and its wild ride of a story will reside in the Big Apple.  

“I was sad,” Bliss said. “But I knew that this was the right place for it to go and especially to New York and so many people will see it and he will get his due and to me, that’s more important than me having to be sad because I’m losing that work of art.” 

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Working Strategies: Quitting your job Part 2 — Consider your personal finances

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Working Strategies: Quitting your job Part 1: What to do at work

Do you know what the problem is for people who quit jobs? It’s the timing. People tend to wait too long, then quit all of a sudden, leaving themselves with a pile of unfinished business.

Amy Lindgren

Sometimes that business is emotional, with workers’ feelings of being unappreciated accumulating to a toxic level by the time they exit. There’s usually some unfinished business in the job itself, and in the worker’s career as well, not to mention the feeling of being unprepared personally or financially.

Which brings us back to timing: What’s with that pattern of staying too long and suddenly exiting? For one thing, it’s usually a difficult decision. Most people will delay the real or perceived conflict of quitting for as long as they can, opting to adapt to difficult situations instead.

Others may not recognize that their sense of discontent in life may be rooted in a job that no longer challenges them. If the job itself is reasonable, it’s easy to disregard the nibbling sense that something doesn’t quite fit.

And others may just prefer the known downsides of the current job over the potential (but unknown) upsides of a new position.

Regardless of the reasons for a delay, the truth is, most people eventually do leave their jobs and you probably will too. If you’re near the end of your career, the leave-taking might be through retirement or illness, but otherwise you’re likely to quit for reasons that range from new employment to business startup to just needing time off.

Once you acknowledge that fact, you can take more control of the timing. Instead of disregarding the mounting discontent until you can’t take any more, you can plan steps and processes to follow. Whether these unfold over the course of weeks or years is up to you – which is exactly the point.

To help you organize those steps, last week’s column provided five things to do in your current job before quitting. Today we’ll look at five things to do in your personal finances, and next week’s column will finish the series with a look at five things to do in your career before stepping out the door.

Organize (or pay down) your debt. It’s a rare person who doesn’t have debt, whether that’s a mortgage, car loan, student loan, credit cards, or a combination of all of these. The reason to review these accounts while you’re working is three-fold: One, what you discover may influence your timing; two, if you want to make a major purchase, that will be easier while you’re still working; and three, strategies such as refinancing your mortgage to achieve lower payments will be more difficult after you quit.

This step holds true even if you’re quitting to start a new job, because longevity in your position is often considered in lending decisions. And it’s a hundred times more true if you’re quitting to start a business — one of the most difficult positions from which to re-organize one’s debt.

Retirement accounts. Decisions to roll over a 401(k), to set up a new retirement account, or to convert an IRA to a Roth are all things best considered before quitting, while you have the most options available.

Health insurance. You don’t need to be reminded, but just in case: Be sure you know what health insurance options will be available after you leave your job. If any steps can be handled now, you’ll appreciate not having that burden later, when the timing could be more critical.

Take your sick days. Speaking of health … have you used your sick time? Those days have been set aside for you to use in taking care of your health, so now’s the time to schedule your preventative care. This is especially smart if your sick days are “use it or lose it” in terms of payout.

Figure out your cash flow. If you’re taking another job, this step may be built-in, since you’ve already negotiated your next salary. But if you’re leaving without another source of income, you’ll enjoy the getaway more if there’s gas in the car. Don’t just assume that your savings will cover you. Make a decision about how much of your savings you’re willing to spend before you need a new income source.

If all of these personal finance steps are starting to kill your enthusiasm for quitting, don’t worry. You’ll get your motivation back next week when you review the steps to take in your career to ensure a good transition.

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‘I’m an American, I do what I want’: ‘Squid Game’ VIP actor once ranted, advocated dating Thai women

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Geoffrey Giuliano squid game vip 4

Geoffrey Giuliano, the actor who plays one of the controversial VIP characters in the latest hit drama “Squid Game,” was previously filmed going on a rant in a supermarket in Thailand. Users online are now calling him the “real life” version of his villainous character. 

The supermarket incident: A 2017 DailyMail story showed the actor, now 68, swearing at another customer while purchasing items at a Big-C supermarket in Pattaya. 

  • The customer, an unnamed French expat, claimed that Giuliano jumped in front of him in an express “10 items or less” checkout line and proceeded to throw roughly 25 items on the conveyor belt.  
  • As he began to film the incident, Giuliano said to him, “You’re not intimidating me by that camera, I’m an actor.”
  • In the video, the French customer can be heard replying, “I’m just waiting for the next round, because what you said about America was very interesting.”
  • Giuliano becomes visibly irate and swears at the customer: “Go f*** yourself, OK. Go f*** yourself, OK, let’s get it real straight. You can go f*** yourself, OK.”
  • He continues: “​​I’m an American, I do what I want, we’re the kings of the world, OK. We’re professional a*******. We have taken being a******* to the highest possible f****** level in this world.” 
  • The customer said that Giuliano was initially “aggressive” with how he threw his items down. He started to film once Giuliano spoke about “being American and being able to do what he wanted.”
  • Both Giuliano’s wife and child were present during the ordeal. His wife was described as “friendly” and that she “looked embarrassed by his behavior.” 
  • The story resurfaced on the controversial subreddit r/Aznidentity, with users pointing out the similarities between Giuliano and his character, identified on the show as VIP Four. 

More on Giuliano’s past: In 2016, one year before the grocery store incident, the actor made news when he was involved in an investigation for missing iconic photographs. That same year, he also promoted a website aimed toward men who want to date Thai women. 

  • A Mail on Sunday investigation of the missing photos of John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s wedding led an undercover reporter to Giuliano, who reportedly claimed to have the photos’ negatives worth over $100,000 up for sale. Giuliano put the reporter in contact with a mysterious middle-man. ​
  • ​”Giuliano said he had been instructed to sell the negatives on behalf of a friend but the deal soured when Giuliano suspected the reporter was acting for Ono and refused to sell them before launching into a vile tirade against her,” the report said.
  • In the same year, the actor posted several videos on his YouTube channel promoting a website called “Date Thai Ladies.” Each of the videos show him expanding on several stereotypes of Thai women. 
  • In one video, he addresses the question, “Why Should a Beautiful Thai Lady Want Me?” His answer: “All you want is the love and respect you deserve, the same thing that Thai ladies want — which, quite frankly, they don’t often get from Thai men.” In another video titled “If I Date a Thai Girl I will be Ridiculed by My Friends?” he assures any potential clients that “Thai women are the most beautiful, sensual women in the world.” Finally in another video, he compares his experience of being with Thai women to his 30-year marriage with an American woman. “These Thai ladies are really quite sincere. They’re looking for a family, they’re family-oriented.” 
  • According to his IMDB page, the actor recently appeared in a small role in the Netflix movie “Kate.” He’s also coming out with a TV series titled “Last Tango In Thailand” which features the actor “homing in on the infamous Vietnam era sex-for-sale, seaside town of Pattaya, where he takes a wild ride through the mean streets of the global swinging capitol of the world.”
  • Early on in his career, the actor played McDonald’s mascot Ronald McDonald before he became a vegetarian and turned his back on the fast food company. He’s been featured in the 1997 documentary “McLibel” about the lawsuit by McDonald’s against environmentalists.

Featured Image via “Squid Game” (left), Daily Mail (right)

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