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Odds you’ll run into someone contagious with COVID in Colorado are at their highest point this year

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Odds you’ll run into someone contagious with COVID in Colorado are at their highest point this year

The odds that a Colorado resident will run across someone who’s contagious with COVID-19 in any large group are now higher than they’ve been since the start of 2021 — though how much people should worry about that depends on whether they’ve been vaccinated.

With the state now experiencing its fifth wave of the virus, about one in every 99 people was estimated to be contagious as of last Wednesday, according to a new report from the Colorado School of Public Health’s COVID-19 modeling team. During the fall surge last year, about one in every 40 people was contagious.

When so many people are contagious, it means that interactions will remain relatively risky, even if cases start to go down, said Beth Carlton, an associate professor of environmental and occupational health at the School of Public Health. Getting vaccinated, wearing masks and avoiding high-risk activities will help speed up the return to the relative freedom we had in the early summer, but “it takes a while,” she said.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s COVID-19 data paints a mixed picture of whether the situation is improving. But what is clear is that unvaccinated people remain highly vulnerable, Carlton said. The state reported about 83% of those who are hospitalized now aren’t fully vaccinated.

New cases were down for a second week, with 11,561 reported in the week ending Sunday. But the percentage of tests coming back positive was up, reaching 6.58% over the last three days. That suggests the state might not have a complete picture of how widely the virus is spreading.

So far, Colorado has been spared the large increase in seriously ill children that some states have endured, though about 26% of new coronavirus cases are in people younger than 20.

Hospitalizations also were difficult to interpret. As of Monday afternoon, 980 people were hospitalized with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. That’s an improvement over the previous Monday, but a worsening compared to Saturday and Sunday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone wear masks in indoor public places when their community has 50 or more cases for every 100,000 people. Only three Colorado counties have case rates lower than that: San Juan, Hinsdale and Lake. More than 10% of tests in Lake County were positive, though, suggesting the virus is spreading more widely than the case numbers show, and residents might want to mask up.

It appears that the rapid increase in cases and hospitalizations Colorado saw in August has slowed down, but it’s not clear if a decrease is starting, Carlton said.

“I think we’re at a very uncertain moment,” she said. “We’re seeing these kind of wild swings in the data.”

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Check your onions again: FDA announces more recalls

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Check your onions again: FDA announces more recalls

(File: Getty)

(WEHT) – Earlier this week, the CDC announced that fresh whole onions were the cause of a salmonella outbreak that traced to 37 states across the U.S. and were distributed by ProSource Inc.

The company imported the onions from Chihuahua, Mexico, and distributed them to restaurants and grocery stores throughout the United States. ProSource said the possibly tainted onions were last imported Aug. 27, but because of the vegetable’s long shelf life they may still be on shelves.

Now, two more recalls have been announced involving onions. The FDA is urging people to throw out any onions from HelloFresh and EveryPlate received July 7 through Sep. 8. The companies say they have been informed by one of their suppliers that they’re voluntarily recalling onions due to potential salmonella.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still investigating the nationwide salmonella outbreak that has been linked to onions from Mexico. More than 600 people have reportedly gotten sick; no one has died.

If you are experiencing any symptoms, health officials encourage you to contact your healthcare provider immediately. Click here for more information from the FDA about this supplier recall and the potentially related symptoms.

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Deshaun Watson to the Broncos? One oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance.

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Deshaun Watson to the Broncos? One oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance.

Could the Broncos be getting a new quarterback again?

With a week left before the Nov. 2 NFL trade deadline, one oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance at landing embattled Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson.

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Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse

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Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Two years ago, Apple threatened to pull Facebook and Instagram from its app store over concerns about the platform being used as a tool to trade and sell maids in the Mideast.

After publicly promising to crack down, Facebook acknowledged in internal documents obtained by The Associated Press that it was “under-enforcing on confirmed abusive activity” that saw Filipina maids complaining on the social media site of being abused. Apple relented and Facebook and Instagram remained in the app store.

But Facebook’s crackdown seems to have had a limited effect. Even today, a quick search for “khadima,” or “maids” in Arabic, will bring up accounts featuring posed photographs of Africans and South Asians with ages and prices listed next to their images. That’s even as the Philippines government has a team of workers that do nothing but scour Facebook posts each day to try and protect desperate job seekers from criminal gangs and unscrupulous recruiters using the site.

While the Mideast remains a crucial source of work for women in Asia and Africa hoping to provide for their families back home, Facebook acknowledged some countries across the region have “especially egregious” human rights issues when it comes to laborers’ protection.

“In our investigation, domestic workers frequently complained to their recruitment agencies of being locked in their homes, starved, forced to extend their contracts indefinitely, unpaid, and repeatedly sold to other employers without their consent,” one Facebook document read. “In response, agencies commonly told them to be more agreeable.”

The report added: “We also found recruitment agencies dismissing more serious crimes, such as physical or sexual assault, rather than helping domestic workers.”

In a statement to the AP, Facebook said it took the problem seriously, despite the continued spread of ads exploiting foreign workers in the Mideast.

“We prohibit human exploitation in no uncertain terms,” Facebook said. “We’ve been combating human trafficking on our platform for many years and our goal remains to prevent anyone who seeks to exploit others from having a home on our platform.”

This story, along with others published Monday, is based on disclosures made to the Securities and Exchange Commission and provided to Congress in redacted form by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen’s legal counsel. The redacted versions were obtained by a consortium of news organizations, including the AP.

Taken as a whole, the trove of documents show that Facebook’s daunting size and user base around the world — a key factor in its rapid ascent and near trillion-dollar valuation — also proves to be its greatest weakness in trying to police illicit activity, such as the sale of drugs, and suspected human rights and labor abuses on its site.

Activists say Facebook, based in Menlo Park, California, has both an obligation and likely the means to fully crack down on the abuses their services facilitate as it earns tens of billions of dollars a year in revenue.

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