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Missouri woman convicted of killing husband in 2012

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Missouri woman convicted of killing husband in 2012

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – Three years after a Florissant woman was swept away in the Meramec River and drowned in Castlewood State Park, her family has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

Rose Shaw died in Aug. 2018 while trying to save her friend’s daughter, 12-year-old Deniya Johnson. According to our partners at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Shaw and Johnson were wading in the river with three other people when they encountered a drop-off in the river and all five went under. Shaw was 35.

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You Paid For It: Mother of six with bug infestation now moving into new home

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You Paid For It: Mother of six with bug infestation now moving into new home

ST. LOUIS – Fox 2’s You Paid For It Team is getting results for a mother of six who has been living in an apartment on Missouri Avenue in South St Louis with a horrific bug infestation. She’s now going to move to a new home.

It’s a situation that agencies, including the St. Louis Housing Authority, have known about for months.

The Housing Authority pays $1,200 a month of tax dollars for the family to live in an apartment where there’s a colony of dozens of bugs clustered in the ceiling, and many of them scamper across the floor.

Latoya Dixon called You Paid For It after she said she got nowhere getting action from officials including the Housing Authority.

Fox 2’s Elliott Davis got on the case and showed the horrible conditions in which she lived in a report that aired on Monday.

The head of the St. Louis Housing Authority Alana Green said her agency gave Dixon a voucher to move elsewhere. Trouble was that Dixon could not find a place that would take her and her kids.

Elliott Davis called HUD for help on this deal. He got an email from the Biden Administration’s HUD Spokeswoman in Washington D.C.

”HUD’s number one priority is the safety and health of those who live in HUD-assisted housing. Our Department is concerned any time we learn of reports of unsafe conditions. We are in the process of investigating these reports,” the statement reads.

Dixon said she just got the call that the apartment she’s moving to has had the final inspection and that she may be able to move as soon as tomorrow.

The irony is that this was the same apartment she was told she couldn’t have something that changed after the You Paid For It Team got involved and turned up the heat on the Housing Authority.

Below is a statement from St. Louis Housing Authority Executive Director Alana Green:

“The St. Louis Housing Authority has been working with Ms. Dixon since she reported the issue with bugs in her apartment in late September. As you know, the unit in question is neither owned nor managed by the St. Louis Housing Authority. The SLHA made the landlord aware of the bug problem and it is their responsibility to resolve it.  Ms. Dixon was originally given a voucher by the SLHA in August that allowed her to move to a different unit of her choosing. We understand that Ms. Dixon has found a new unit and she is working with the landlord to finalize her move. We continue to work with her to help her expedite her move and resolve this problem.”

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Fallen Sailor honored as body returns home

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Fallen Sailor honored as body returns home

ST. LOUIS – Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Bailey Tucker was one of five U.S. Navy sailors killed in a helicopter crash in the Pacific Ocean on Aug. 31. His remains were recently recovered from the ocean floor and arrived at St. Louis Lambert International Airport Friday. 

A procession of military backers and supporters led the family from the airport to Baue Funeral Home in St. Charles County.  

Tucker was a 2018 graduate of Parkway North High School. Among those who stood near the Cave Springs exit off I-70 was Robbin Wolf. She said the Tucker family lives in her neighborhood and has always offered support to others.  

“The family is a giving family and loving,” Robbin Wolf said. Her husband also came to show his respects.  

“He showed up for us,” said Scott Wolf. “So, we are going to show up for him.” 

Several area fire departments raised American flags on overpasses as the procession traveled along I-70. 

“We’re just here to honor Bailey,” said Jason Meinershagen, Central County Fire Rescue public information officer. “We recognize that we wouldn’t have the freedoms and be able to do the things we do without him.”

Navy veteran Jodene Reppert traveled to St. Charles County to show her appreciation for Bailey’s service to his country.

“You need to be honored and your family should be honored and thanked for their sacrifice,” she said. 

The MH-60S crashed on Aug. 31 about 70 miles (112 kilometers) off San Diego during what the Navy described as routine flight operations. It was operating from the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln. 

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Keeler: Move over, Vic Fangio. Colorado State’s Steve Addazio is the worst clock-manager in town. And he just joined you on the hot seat.

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WATCH: CSU botches last-minute field goal attempt against Utah State

For a second there, you almost felt sorry for Steve Addazio. A little. At least until he started throwing his own players under the bus, one by one.

“I would say to you is they got caught up in the emotion of the game and took off on the field,” the CSU football coach said of the insanity that made up the final 11 seconds of Utah State 26, Rams 24. “I’m like, ‘Who sent them on?’

“And no one sent them on. So, it just happened. Which means that it’s my responsibility, because that can’t happen.”

Oh, but it did. Dazfoonery. Absolute insanity. A clown show in cleats.

Spike the ball!

Spike it! What are you do …

In a sequence they’ll be talking about for years, probably with calliope music playing in the background, the Rams had bravely and methodically driven the ball downfield, trailing by two.

Quarterback Todd Centeio, with no timeouts, had Elwayed CSU to the Aggies’ 24-yard line with half a minute on the clock.

Then all heck broke loose.

Or rather, the Rams’ field-goal unit broke loose.

With 11 seconds left, instead of spiking the ball or throwing a prayer to Trey McBride or Dante Wright, the CSU sideline turned into Piccadilly Circus. The offense, while still on the field, expecting a spike to stop the clock, saw their special-teams compatriots racing to the line of scrimmage, shooing them off.

Chaos ensued. CSU kicker Cayden Camper rushed onto the spot and rushed a 42-yard attempt with a second remaining on the scoreboard. It sailed wide left, and the stunned Homecoming crowd at Maverik Stadium erupted at their fortune.

“Having said that, we were perfectly set up and ready to kick the field goal,” Addazio continued. “I don’t believe that had any impact on that field goal whatsoever.”

Vic Fangio, you owe this man a beer. Or six.

Fangio, the besieged Broncos coach, uses timeouts in crunch time the way a toddler uses a plate of spaghetti. But compared to Addazio, Uncle Vic is the second coming of Bill Walsh.

They’re also both so in over their heads as head coaches here, it’s pitiful. In some alternate universe right now, Fangio is serving as Urban Meyer’s defensive coordinator. Addazio is coaching Urban’s offensive line.

Alas, we’re all stuck with this reality. And it bites.

“I could tell that they were obviously disorganized,” Utah State coach Blake Anderson told the CBS Sports Network immediately after the tilt. “It just didn’t look organized.”

The kicker to the kicker? Anderson admitted that he was going to call a timeout to try and ice Camper.

Instead, the Rams iced their own guy for him.

Spike the ball!

Spike it! What are you do …

“It’s frustrating,” said McBride, the tight end whose six receptions, along with tailback David Bailey’s 159 rushing yards, went for naught. “It’s heartbreaking.”

Especially given the stakes. Inside track within the Mountain West’s Mountain division. A 3-0 start to league play. More than halfway home to bowl eligibility.

What we got was an evening marred by the hallmarks of poor coaching, from preparation to execution: Painful, silly CSU penalties — nine in all, at least six of them on offsides calls — and ever sillier mental mistakes.

CSU sacked Aggies quarterback Logan Bonner eight times. The power and leverage advantages along the line of scrimmage were palpable. The bigger, badder Rams (3-4, 2-1 Mountain West) would win a slugfest with Utah State  (5-2, 3-1) 11 times out of 10.

But the Aggies weren’t interested in a stand-up brawl — Anderson wanted to duck and weave, to rope and to dope, and tire the heavyweight Rams into doing something dumb.

Team Daz, sadly, obliged. Repeatedly.

And we can’t say the Boston College faithful didn’t warn us: Since 2013, Addazio-coached teams are 9-18 in games decided by six points or fewer. Since 2018, they’re 0-6.

With Boise State (3-4) at home up next, a wounded franchise that CSU hasn’t beaten in 10 tries, followed by Wyoming (4-2) on the road and Air Force (6-1) at home, those aren’t exactly the kind of stats that inspire confidence along the Poudre.

Nor, frankly, did Friday. The Rams were having so much fun leading with their fists that they forgot, too often, to use their heads.

Four first-half penalties and two turnovers early gave the smaller, quicker and pass-happy Aggies seven first-half possessions to CSU’s six. And two of those came in the final five minutes of the second quarter thanks to the Aggies’ special teams. USU kicked a field goal, then lobbed the ensuing kickoff into a gap within the Rams’ return unit, recovering the rock at the CSU 24.

And because the Daz chose to sit on his timeouts at the end of the half rather than stop the clock on USU’s stunning post-kickoff possession, the Aggies got the ball three different times between the final six minutes of the second quarter and the first five minutes of the third quarter — while the Rams had it only once.

Guess what Daz did with that possession? He took a knee to run off the final 25 seconds of the first half. The hosts, meanwhile, turned those extra cracks with the pigskin into nine points, ducking and jabbing their way to a 23-14 lead that forced the Rams into catch-up mode.

“I don’t know, I don’t know,” Addazio said after the game about his thinking, or lack thereof, during that mid-game juncture.

“I just (felt) like we had too many penalties in the first half, we turned the ball over twice …”

Defense and a run game travel well on the road. Stubbornness and stupidity, however, do not. And never will.

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