Connect with us

News

Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold wanted private security due to threats. One state board said no.

Published

on

Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold wanted private security due to threats. One state board said no.

A political action committee chaired by Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold wanted the state’s approval to pay for private security because she was getting more threats after the 2020 election. On Tuesday, the Colorado Independent Ethics Commission unanimously said no.

The commission, made up of current and former Colorado attorneys, said the request violated Article 29 of the Colorado Constitution, which is a code of ethics for government officials.

The proposal was officially filed by from the Democratic Association of Secretaries of State PAC, which urged the commission to not consider the payment of security as a gift, but rather a benefit to the state because of the increasing volume of threats. It also said the payment could be from the association itself, a different political organization, a nonprofit or an individual.

But commission members were concerned that the security would be used for Griswold’s official events — including her re-election campaign or other political events, as Colorado Politics first reported.

Elections officials across the country have reported an increase in threats over the past year, particularly related to unsubstantiated claims about rampant fraud in the 2020 election.

Griswold told The Post on Sept. 15 that female secretaries of state seem to the primary target, including herself, Michigan’s Jocelyn Benson and Arizona’s Katie Hobbs. This summer, the U.S. Department of Justice and FBI launched a task force to investigate physical threats against state and local elected officials.

“I think part of it is that we’ve been standing up for the right to vote, pushing back in a very public way against the voter suppression we’re seeing across the nation,” Griswold said.

google news