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US lawmakers and experts worry about kids and COVID-19

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US lawmakers and experts worry about kids and COVID-19

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — United States lawmakers say not enough is being done to protect children during the pandemic.

“Communities and families are now struggling with the delta variant, a far more infectious version of the virus,” Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) said.

Pallone says local leaders need to be more responsible, especially for those too young to be vaccinated.

“The state and local actions that ignore or even contradict the science put our children at risk and undermine our ability to end the pandemic,” Pallone said.

The American Academy of Pediatrics reports that children now represent 25% of the country’s new COVID-19 cases and encourages schools to keep up mitigation efforts.

“To keep the school communities safe until vaccination rates are high enough to significantly reduce the spread of COVID-19,” AAP President Dr. Lee Beers said.

While opinions around masks and social distancing are still divided, lawmakers and experts agree other underlying issues are a huge concern. Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-Va.) says there should be more attention on mental health.

“Many of our children are suffering from elevated levels of anxiety, depression, obesity and eating disorders or lagging in educational, social development resulting from the pandemic and school closures,” Griffith said.

“School psychologists are critical to overcome learning loss and address behavioral health issues effectively,” American Psychological Association CEO Arthur Evans said.

Pfizer reported its vaccine had a positive response in young children and lawmakers say FDA approval for children under 12, will help relieve a huge burden from kids and their parents.

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Ravens coach John Harbaugh on defense’s ‘biggest problem,’ Patrick Mekari’s ankle injury and more | NOTES

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The Ravens’ biggest problem on defense this season hasn’t changed. If they can’t tackle, they can’t succeed.

Tackling woes again plagued the Ravens in their 41-17 loss Sunday to the Bengals, with Cincinnati quarterback Joe Burrow amassing nearly half of his career-high 416 passing yards after the catch, according to Pro Football Focus. Running backs Joe Mixon and Samaje Perine also ripped off fourth-quarter touchdowns against a defense that couldn’t bring them down.

As the Ravens enter their bye week on a low note, their defensive fundamentals are under the microscope. That has been the case seemingly all season, even after spirited wins.

“The biggest problem we have on defense right now, in terms of big plays, is not getting guys on the ground, whether it’s been underneath slant routes or screen routes or, in one case, we got the screen-and-go,” coach John Harbaugh said Monday, referring to Bengals tight end C.J. Uzomah’s 32-yard catch-and-run touchdown in the third quarter Sunday when he slipped past safety DeShon Elliott in the open field.

When the Ravens return in Week 9 for their home game against the Minnesota Vikings, there will be little letup for the defense. Running back Dalvin Cook averaged a broken tackle every 9.5 carries last season, according to Pro Football Reference, though his elusiveness has slipped this season. Wide receiver Justin Jefferson, who starred alongside Bengals rookie Ja’Marr Chase at LSU, is ninth in the NFL with 542 receiving yards.

“Until we get [tackling] fixed, we’ll be a very mediocre defense, generally speaking,” Harbaugh said. “Our guys understand that. … When we play really good defense, we’re tackling. And that’s got to get done. And there’s a lot of reasons for that. Sometimes they’re not pushing to the right zone, so there’s more space in there than there should be. Other times, we take a bad angle. Sometimes a guy’s not covered.

“There’s different reasons for it, but the results are uniformly not good. And you’re a consistent, good defense when you consistently do all the little things well. And when we start doing all the little things well, then we’re going to be a better defense.”

Mekari hurting

Harbaugh declined to comment on right tackle Patrick Mekari’s condition, saying only that he has an ankle injury. The NFL Network reported Monday that Mekari, who was hurt in the second quarter, suffered a high-ankle sprain and is “seeking more feedback.” High-ankle sprains generally take at least a month to recover from.

Mekari is the Ravens’ highest-rated tackle, according to PFF, and played every offensive snap from Week 2, when he took over after Alejandro Villanueva moved to left tackle, to Week 6. Harbaugh said last week that he “couldn’t ask for a better player there [at right tackle] right now.”

With Ronnie Stanley (ankle) sidelined for the season, the team will likely turn once more to Tyre Phillips, who started at left guard in Week 1 before suffering a minor knee injury. He replaced Mekari on Sunday and struggled against Cincinnati’s pass rush.

“We’ll just see where it goes,” Harbaugh said of Mekari’s injury.

Extra points

  • Harbaugh called the Ravens’ performance Sunday “our worst game of the season, worst game in a long time.” But he stressed that the team is not even at the midpoint of a long season. “We’ve got 10 games left,” he said. “We need to keep growing as a football team and building on what we’ve done and what we haven’t done and make the strongest run we can for the next 10 weeks, and that’s what we’re planning on doing.”
  • After Ravens running backs combined for 29 rushing yards on 11 carries Sunday, Harbaugh was asked about the position’s struggles on the ground. “We just have to block better, scheme better, run better,” he said. “There are specifics in there in terms of schemes, and every play stands on its own. But we can’t go through all — how many run plays have we had this year that haven’t been successful? You can go through every one of them and you get the specific answer.”
  • Defensive lineman Derek Wolfe (hip/back) is “very close” to returning to practice, Harbaugh said. Wolfe has yet to play this season after suffering an injury in training camp. “This week, next week, hopefully, and we’ll see,” he said.

©2021 Baltimore Sun. Visit baltimoresun.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Patriots-Chargers injury report: Devin McCourty not listed, 15 limited Wednesday

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Oct. 28—The Patriots listed 15 players on their initial practice report Wednesday — and that meant good news in New England.

Why?

Veteran safety Devin McCourty, who missed the second half of last Sunday’s game with an abdomen injury, was not listed. As a full participant in Wednesday’s padded practice, McCourty should be expected to play this weekend at the Chargers.

None of his teammates were absent Wednesday, including rookie corner Shaun Wade, who had missed the last three weeks with a concussion. Pats linebacker Dont’a Hightower has also recovered from the hurt elbow that contributed to him missing Sunday’s win over the Jets. He’s now only limited because of an ankle injury.

The Patriots’ complete injury report is below. The Chargers’ will be released later Wednesday evening.

Limited

C David Andrews (ankle)

LB Ja’Whaun Bentley (ribs)

WR Kendrick Bourne (shoulder)

DT Carl Davis (hand)

S Kyle Dugger (neck)

K Nick Folk (left knee)

DT Davon Godchaux (finger)

LB Dont’a Hightower (ankle)

LB Brandon King (thigh)

G Shaq Mason (abdomen)

TE Jonnu Smith (shoulder)

LB Josh Uche (shoulder)

LB Kyle Van Noy (groin)

CB Shaun Wade (concussion)

DE Deatrich Wise (knee)

(c)2021 the Boston Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Omar Kelly: Dolphins players say lack of veteran leadership contributes to skid

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Omar Kelly: Dolphins players say lack of veteran leadership contributes to skid

MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — Last year Ryan Fitzpatrick lost his starting job to Tua Tagovailoa, the rookie quarterback the Miami Dolphins wanted to build around.

Nevertheless, the savvy veteran was still called on in emergency game situations when clutch play was needed and retained his alpha male status in the locker room, which is why he was given the Leadership Award by his teammates at the end of the 2020 season.

Ereck Flowers taught Miami’s young offensive linemen how to be pros on and off the field, and former Dolphins center Ted Karras taught them how to study film and made proper in-game protection calls.

Former Dolphins safety Bobby McCain held the secondary together, making all the coverage checks and calls, keeping the unit on one accord.

Linebacker Kyle Van Noy made many of the front-line checks and got everyone in position. According to team sources, Van Noy also routinely challenged the coaching staff about troublesome game plans and in-game calls, keeping them accountable to the players.

If we’re doing a deep dive on what’s gone wrong this season with the Dolphins — attempting to explain how a 10-6 team in 2020 delivered a 1-6 start in 2021 — we have to bring up the purge of leaders that took place this offseason.

As a free agent, Fitzpatrick moved to Washington, where he was named the starter before injuring his hip in the season opener, and Tagovailoa has struggled to come out of his shadow as a leader, not player.

“He’s great, and he’s trying,” one Dolphins player said about Tagovailoa, who owns a 7-6 record as Miami’s starting quarterback heading into Sunday’s game against the Buffalo Bills (4-2). “But it’s not Fitz.”

Releasing Van Noy and McCain, trading away Flowers to move up 14 spots in the seventh round of the draft, and not re-signing Karras created cap space. But their departures left leadership voids on units that have struggled this season.

Miami’s linebacker unit has have been a mess, and Jaelan Phillips has struggled to replace Van Noy. The secondary constantly features breakdowns, although Jevon Holland has shown early promise as the starting free safety. The offensive line is on its third starting center and lacks a quality NFL starter like Flowers, who has started every game for Washington this season.

In a tough stretch like Miami’s six-game losing streak, leadership matters, because it is those veterans who are responsible for the heavy lifting when it comes to restoring morale and instilling fight and belief into the team.

Elandon Roberts, Jesse Davis and Clayton Fejedelem, who were all captains in 2020, and receiver Mack Hollins are doing their best to steer the Dolphins into less troubling waters.

But somehow, this team has lost its way.

“As a leader, you learn that it’s hard to motivate people. You’ve got to learn from each individual person what each individual person needs,” said Hollins, who was named an offensive captain this season.

“There are guys that need to get [yelled at]. There are guys who need to be brought over to the side. There are guys that you need to tell their best friend that [they] need to talk to them. Being able to maneuver that is something all leaders [must do]. You never complete that job. It’s never I know how to work with everybody, especially in this league because there are always people changing, there are always new teammates, there are always new players.”

And that’s part of the problem the Dolphins have had trying to build on 2020′s success.

Two weeks ago, the Dolphins held a players-only meeting to address what they felt were the team’s pressing issues.

There was talk about accountability, lack of effort and commitment, doing the extra things in practices and the team’s preparation, the need for more excitement and energy on the field.

Plenty of talk happened.

The problem is, it didn’t stop the bleeding, and sources say the solutions proposed — more energy, more accountability — weren’t going to fix anything, because it’s on-field execution that has been the issue.

“Are players who make mistakes getting benched?” a Dolphins defender asked. “Are they losing their roles? They pushed out the veterans for the young guys, and then wonder why we don’t look the same. It’s because mistakes keep getting made, and who is being held accountable?”

More importantly, who has this team been able to lean on for performances that back up the words of wisdom, or inspirational prep talk?

After all, words are better followed up with action.

“We’ve just got to take it one game, one play and one practice at a time. It’s no secret,” said Roberts, who will likely have more responsibility if Jerome Baker, the team’s leading tackler, is sidelined by the knee injury he suffered in last Sunday’s 30-28 loss to the Atlanta Falcons.

“There’s no magical thing that you need to do as a captain or as a teammate. It’s nothing. You just got to come in every day with the work mentality to get it right, and that’s by taking it one practice at a time, taking it one play at time and taking it one game at a time.”

©2021 South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Visit sun-sentinel.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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