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Governor’s Traffic Safety free child seat inspections

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Governor’s Traffic Safety free child seat inspections

GLENVILLE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Monday, September 27, from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., the Town of Glenville Police Department will host free car seat checks by certified child passenger safety technicians.

The Traffic Safety Committee reminds parents and caregivers in Schenectady County, this event is part of a yearlong safety initiative in which state and local law enforcement agencies, with various community safety partners, offer free child seat inspections.

Trained technicians use the “Learn, Practice, and Explain” model to educate parents and caregivers on how to choose and properly install appropriate child seats for their child’s age, size, and vehicle, so they can be used correctly every time.

Those who cannot attend this free car seat check event can make an appointment with a local fitting station. Find more information on upcoming car seat check events near you, or contact Mark Agostino at (518) 384-0123 or [email protected]

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Hollywood makeover breathes new life into 157-year-old Welsh soccer club

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Hollywood makeover breathes new life into 157-year-old Welsh soccer club

WREXHAM, Wales — It has been described as a “crash course in football club ownership” and the two Hollywood stars who bought a beleaguered team in English soccer’s fifth tier with the lofty aim of transforming it into a global force are certainly learning on the job.

“I’m watching our PLAYERS MOP THE FIELD to continue the game,” read a tweet last week from Rob McElhenney, an American actor and director who was the creator of TV show “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” and now makes up one half of the new ownership of Wrexham AFC.

“I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The residents of Wrexham have been rubbing their eyes in disbelief for a while.

It’s nearly a year since McElhenney and Ryan Reynolds, the Canadian-born actor best known for starring in the “Deadpool” movies, completed their out-of-nowhere $2.5 million takeover of Wrexham, a 157-year-old club from Wales that has fallen on such hard times since the turn of the century that its supporters’ trust twice had to save the team from going out of business.

Once the seed was planted by friends about buying a European soccer team, they sought out advisors to recommend a club that had history, was in a false position, and played a big role in the local community. Wrexham fitted the bill.

After all, it’s the world’s third oldest professional club that used to attract attendances of 20,000 in the 1970s — and had some big wins in the FA Cup in the 1990s, including over then-English champion Arsenal — but has been languishing at non-league level, where some teams are semi-professional, since 2008. Located in an industrial town of about 65,000 people near the northwest English border, it is not too far from the soccer hotbeds of Liverpool and Manchester.

To the amazement of everyone involved in English and Welsh soccer, the purchase went through and McElhenney and Reynolds immediately made some big promises: improvements to the stadium, playing squad and leadership structure; a major investment in the women’s team; and to “introduce the club to the world.” They’ve stayed true to their word, making Wrexham stand out at a time when many clubs below the lucrative English Premier League have plunged into financial turmoil because of the effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

“I remember when it all first broke on the news, it seemed a bit surreal,” Wrexham manager Phil Parkinson told The Associated Press. “But since I’ve spoken to them, you understand how serious they are in terms of making a success of this club and leaving a legacy.”

Walking through the tunnel and onto the field at the Racecourse Ground, it’s impossible to not notice the giant stand — known as “The Kop” — to the left that is being renovated and currently is covered in a huge red banner. On it are Wrexham’s new sponsors, TikTok, Aviation Gin and Expedia, globally recognized brands that typically have no place at this level of the game.

Season-ticket sales have nearly trebled, from 2,000 to around 5,800, and attendances have been more than 8,000 for home games, better than many clubs get in the third and fourth tiers and a figure virtually unheard of at non-league level.

For the first full season under Reynolds and McElhenney, the men’s squad has been enhanced — one player was signed for 200,000 pounds ($270,000), nearly a club record — and there’s a new coach and chief executive with decades of experience working in the English Football League, the three divisions below the Premier League.

Behind the scenes, there are advisors acting as conduits between the board and the new owners who have held important leadership roles in British soccer: former Liverpool CEO Peter Moore, former Football Association technical director Les Reed and former English Football League CEO Shaun Harvey.

Meanwhile, the push to put Wrexham “on the map” in world soccer is ongoing.

It recently became the first non-league team to be included on the popular video game, FIFA. Reynolds (18 million) and McElhenney (700,000) use their large Twitter following to promote the club — and even to comment on the team’s games as an incredulous McElhenney did on Saturday when Wrexham’s match was abandoned because of a waterlogged pitch.

And in what could perhaps be the biggest game-changer, Wrexham is the subject of an access-all-areas TV documentary charting its transformation under the new ownership. A two-season order of “Welcome to Wrexham” has been placed by American channel FX, with Reynolds and McElhenney the executive directors of what could prove to be something like a real-life version of Emmy Award-winning U.S. comedy “Ted Lasso.”

FX has said the documentary will explore “the club, the town, and Rob and Ryan’s crash course in football club ownership.” Camera crews have been at the club for much of the past year.

“Everywhere you go, there’s a camera,” Wrexham captain Luke Young said. “However many times the crew say, ‘Be yourself and do what’s natural,’ you do to an extent but you then think, ‘Should I say this?’ But they’ve said they’re not going to hang you out to dry.”

So, is Wrexham simply being used as a vehicle to produce a reality TV show, as some skeptics will say? The scale of the transformation and the money being spent by the new owners on all areas of the club suggests otherwise.

How long Reynolds and McElhenney stick around is up for debate. But, for now, Wrexham — both the soccer team and the local area — has been given a lift by the presence of famous new owners and the exposure that is providing. Fleur Robinson, the recently appointed CEO, said the club has new members “from Los Angeles to New York” and especially from Philadelphia, the city where McElhenney is from and the inspiration for Wrexham’s new green away uniform.

The owners have been on chat shows in the U.S., talking about their new project.

“There hasn’t been a day gone by when the football club hasn’t been mentioned in some way on a national or global scale,” Robinson said.

Reynolds and McElhenney have promised to come to Wrexham once pandemic-related travel restrictions are lifted and watch the team, which is currently halfway down the National League standings after nine games.

That visit could be anytime now, and they could be in for quite the reception.

“There is such a buzz about town so this is what everyone is waiting for, to see them,” Robinson said. “They’ve bought a club and not seen it for themselves. I’m sure they are just as excited as the people in Wrexham to come here.”

___

More AP soccer: https://apnews.com/hub/soccer and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

___

Steve Douglas is at https://twitter.com/sdouglas80

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Broncos Briefs: Kyle Fuller’s bad day started on opening drive and didn’t get any better

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Broncos Briefs: Kyle Fuller’s bad day started on opening drive and didn’t get any better

PITTSBURGH — Broncos cornerback Kyle Fuller’s difficult season continued in Sunday’s 27-19 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers. He allowed two long completions and committed a costly penalty.

On the Steelers’ opening drive, Fuller allowed a 23-yard catch by receiver Chase Claypool on third-and-1 and three plays later, a 50-yard touchdown to receiver Diontae Johnson.

“Just got to make a play on the ball,” Fuller said of the touchdown, which Johnson caught at the 15.

Fuller was also called for a 17-yard pass interference penalty in the end zone on third-and-15 from the 18 that led to a Steelers touchdown.

“He had a bad day,” coach Vic Fangio said.

Said Fuller: “(Need a) short memory and just go onto the next week and have a good week of preparation.”

The Broncos have allowed nine explosive pass completions (gain of at least 16 yards) in the past two games.

“It was a tough game for the secondary in general; I wouldn’t put anything just on Kyle,” safety Justin Simmons said. “As a unit, we can be better. I have the utmost confidence in Kyle. He’s a proven player in the league and he knows what it takes in order to be a winner.”

Miller in zone coverage. Having cut the Steelers’ lead to 10-6 in the second quarter, the Broncos’ defense allowed their longest play from scrimmage this year — a 59-yard catch and run by receiver Chase Claypool.

On the play, outside linebacker Von Miller dropped into zone coverage and Claypool cut in front of him to make the catch.

“I had to be inside a little bit more,” Miller said. “When I let him get inside, he can run all day. I need to be more solid in that coverage. I can do it, especially if it’s one or two plays a game. I can get it done. I didn’t get it done (Sunday).”

Bridgewater starts, finishes. Quarterback Teddy Bridgewater was 24-of-38 passing for 288 yards and two touchdowns, but his final pass was his first interception of the season.

Bridgewater practiced on a limited basis Thursday and was full-go on Friday after sustaining a concussion against Baltimore.

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Broncos Report Card: All units took turns making mistakes in loss to Pittsburgh

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Broncos Report Card: All units took turns making mistakes in loss to Pittsburgh

Offense — D

The Broncos started the game with a delay-of-game penalty. Their initial first down didn’t come until 8:08 left in the first half. They were dismal again on third down (2 of 12). Running back Javonte Williams’ penalty (spiking the football after a long run) derailed a red zone possession. And they didn’t score a touchdown until the fourth quarter. This … offense … is … broken — again. Only when times became desperate did the Broncos show a pulse, posting drives of 75 (touchdown), 72 (touchdown) and 72 (failed fourth down) yards in the fourth quarter to turn a 24-6 game into a 27-19 final. There are system-wide issues that are reminiscent of the past five years. The only bright spot was receiver Courtland Sutton, who overcame a Friday-afternoon ankle injury to catch seven passes for 120 yards.

Defense — D

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PHOTOS: Inaugural Boulderthon runs through Boulder

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PHOTOS: Inaugural Boulderthon runs through Boulder

The inaugural Boulderthon took place in Boulder, Colorado on October 10, 2021. The race, which took place under sunny skies and cool temperatures, included a half marathon and a full marathon that started at Boulder Reservoir and ended in downtown Boulder. Organizers said on their website that “we believe Boulder, one of the great running hubs of the country, deserves a signature, premier marathon.” The organization says that promoting the power of running can inspire, transform & improve lives. According to race director Phil Dumontet, 2,750 people registered for the race.

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Three critical Broncos penalties create 12-point swing in Steelers’ favor in Denver’s Week 5 loss at Heinz Field

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Three critical Broncos penalties create 12-point swing in Steelers’ favor in Denver’s Week 5 loss at Heinz Field

In the Broncos’ 27-19 loss at the Steelers on Sunday, three critical penalties created a 12-point swing and proved to be the difference in Denver’s failed comeback attempt.

That trio of flags — one offensive, one defensive and one on special teams — cost the Broncos a near-gimmie for one touchdown, turning that possession into a field goal. And the other two upgraded Pittsburgh field goal attempts into eventual touchdowns at Heinz Field.

Javonte Williams, Kyle Fuller and Dre’Mont Jones were the guilty parties. Williams’ penalty was the first of the three, and came in the second quarter following his 49-yard run to the Steelers’ 2-yard line. Williams spiked the ball following the play, and said he was unaware of the rule about a five-yard delay of game penalty for doing that after not scoring.

“I spiked it because I was mad that I got caught,” Williams said.

That penalty pushed the Broncos back to the 7-yard-line, where instead of a high likelihood of punching it in from near the goal line, the offense proceeded to keep going in reverse before settling for a 29-yard field goal from Brandon McManus.

Four-point swing.

“That was an unusual penalty that had serious ramifications,” coach Vic Fangio said.

Then, on the next possession, cornerback Kyle Fuller — who had a nightmare game that included getting burned for a 50-yard touchdown on Pittsburgh’s opening drive — was flagged for pass interference on a 3rd-and-15 incompletion from the Denver 18-yard line. That turned a would-be Steelers field goal attempt into a one-yard touchdown run two plays later.

Four-point swing.

“I need to get my head back around,” Fuller said of the call. “I guess (the referee saw) too much contact.”

The final decisive flag came in the third quarter, when the Steelers’ opening drive of the second half stalled out at the Denver 33-yard line. During Chris Boswell’s field goal attempt, Dre’Mont Jones used the backs of a couple Pittsburgh linemen to jump over the line. That resulted in Jones being flagged for “leverage,” a 15-yard personal foul.

A rarely called infraction — that’s the first time “leverage” has been called across the NFL this year — turned three points into seven just three plays later, on Ben Roethlisberger’s touchdown pass to Chase Claypool.

That was the Broncos’ third and final four-point swing in the eight-point loss.

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Nuggets’ Will Barton returns to practice, eyes OKC for preseason debut

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Nuggets’ Will Barton returns to practice, eyes OKC for preseason debut

With a wry smile and a knowing shimmy, Nuggets guard Will Barton announced he was back.

The Nuggets ended practice Sunday afternoon with their typical 3-point shooting contest, and Barton, only feet in front of reporters, couldn’t help himself. Barton glanced toward the baseline and then stepped confidently into a smooth corner 3.

Having missed most of training camp, including all three preseason games after rolling his ankle, Barton was back on Sunday running with the starters. The Nuggets (0-3) close their preseason schedule with back-to-back games on Wednesday and Thursday against Oklahoma City, and Nuggets coach Michael Malone said he expects Barton to be available.

It’ll be a departure from Denver’s first three preseason games where training camp standout P.J. Dozier had been the starting shooting guard.

On Sunday, Barton ran alongside Monte Morris, Aaron Gordon, Michael Porter Jr. and Nikola Jokic, assuming his spot in the starting lineup.

“We ran today, we dominated, we won the scrimmages,” said Morris of the group’s chemistry.

Despite Barton’s return, Morris said there was no learning curve with the first team.

Added Malone: “(Will) looked really good. Running the floor, attacking the basket, making explosive plays.”

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AP college football poll: Georgia is No. 1, Big Ten grabs half of top 10, Air Force gets votes

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AP college football poll: Georgia is No. 1, Big Ten grabs half of top 10, Air Force gets votes

Georgia was the new No. 1 in The Associated Press college football poll Sunday by a unanimous vote, taking the top spot during the regular season for the first time since November 1982.

The Bulldogs (62 first-place votes) moved up one spot in the AP Top 25 presented by Regions Bank, a day after preseason No. 1 Alabama lost at Texas A&M. The defending national champion Crimson Tide slipped four spots to No. 5 after its first loss of the season.

After falling out of the rankings last week for the first time this season, the Aggies are back in at No. 21.

Alabama was one of two top-five teams to lose Saturday, opening the door for several teams to rise to rare heights.

Iowa is No 2, up one spot after winning a top-five matchup with Penn State. The Hawkeyes have their best ranking since they reached No. 1 in 1985.

No. 3 Cincinnati has its best ranking ever.

No. 4 Oklahoma moved up two spots after a come-from-behind victory against Texas in the Red River Rivalry.

No. 5 Alabama had a run of 14 straight polls at No. 1 snapped. It is out of the top three for the first time since 2019.

The Big Ten dominates the back half of the top 10 with Ohio State at No. 6, Penn State at No. 7, Michigan at eighth and Michigan State 10th. The Big Ten has five top-10 teams for the first time in the history of the AP poll, which dates to 1936.

Oregon slipped in at No. 9. Kentucky moved up five spots to No. 11 for the Wildcats’ best ranking since 2011.

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Bob Sansevere: Vikings so desperate for wins, they’ll even take this stinker

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Bob Sansevere: Vikings so desperate for wins, they’ll even take this stinker

Impressed with the Vikings’ last-second win?

Don’t be.

Until they put together a lengthy string of victories, it would be best to hold off throwing around accolades.

The fact that they rallied to beat the Detroit Lions 19-17 with a field goal in the final second Sunday at U.S. Bank Stadium only became a fact because they almost blew what should have been an easy win.

“Wasn’t the prettiest of wins, but it was a win, and we’ll take it,” Vikings coach Mike Zimmer said. “Proud of our guys, the way they fought. Not particularly proud of the way we played, though.”

He is an honest fella, that Zimmer.

The Vikings are supposed to beat the Lions. Everybody is supposed to beat the Lions.

And all five teams to play them this year have done exactly that.

The Vikings just were the latest. Those poor hard-luck, sad-sack Lions. They’ve been beaten in the final second by field goals in two of their past three games. At least this Greg Joseph field goal of 54 yards wasn’t an NFL record, like the last one was.

Meantime, to be impressive, the Vikings need to run the table or do something close to that.

Yep, a 14-3 record, that would be impressive. Even a 12-5 or 11-6 record would be impressive.

Anyone see the Vikings winning nine or 10 of their final 12 with games still to be played against the Green Bay Packers (twice), the Cowboys, Rams, Chargers, Niners and half a dozen others?

This team will struggle to get north of .500. That’s just reality.

Here’s more reality: The Vikings very nearly snatched defeat from the jaws of victory. Nobody will be fired over it but somebody should at least receive a stern talking to after running the ball on third-and-7 from the Vikings’ 21 with two minutes left. Alexander Mattison fumbled the ball, the Lions recovered and, with 37 seconds left, took a 17-16 lead.

Why not throw the ball to Justin Jefferson, who was a beast in the first half and practically invisible in the second half? If the Viking got a first down with a pass to Jefferson or any other receiver, they could have run out the clock. Instead, they ran the ball. And fumbled.

“We talked about it,” Zimmer said, referring to deliberating between a run and pass. “If we punted the ball, they’d have 1:20 left or something. The way we’d been rushing their quarterback, I figured we had a good chance not to let them score a touchdown.”

It was a bad play call, and that is not hindsight. It seemed like a bad call even before Mattison’s fumble.

“We have a lot of confidence in the receiver room, in this offense. Do we want the ball in our hands to end the game? Absolutely,” veteran receiver Adam Thielen said. “But at the end of the day, that’s not our job. Our job is to make the play when it’s there. We have a lot of faith in our offensive coaches. … You gotta make plays work. It doesn’t matter what play is called.”

Though they gave up that late touchdown and two-point conversion that put the Lions ahead for the first time, it’s not the defense’s fault the Vikings almost lost.

The defense had sacks on back-to-back plays in the first half. Got a fumble recovery after one of the sacks. Had an interception in the third quarter. And then had another set of back-to-back sacks late in the game when the Lions were desperate to get something going.

The Lions didn’t get anything going until Mattison fumbled.

There was no Dalvin Cook — that pesky ankle kept him sidelined again — but Mattison showed once again he is one of the NFL’s top backup running backs. I mean, when he isn’t fumbling the ball on a crucial third-down run late in the game.

Mattison ran for 113 yards and caught seven passes for 40 yards for a combined 153 yards. This is in no way a suggestion the Vikings keep Cook sidelined, but both Vikings wins (this one and a couple of games ago against Seattle) have come when Mattison started.

Mattison scored the Vikings’ lone touchdown when he caught a short pass, looked stopped short of the end zone and then was shoved in by a couple of beefy teammates.

It will take more than a shove to get the Vikings looking like a playoff team. They would have to beat Carolina going into the bye next Sunday, then beat the Cowboys coming out of it and then do some running of the aforementioned table.

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St Paul’s West Seventh Street businesses, patrons say downtown crime a growing concern

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St Paul’s West Seventh Street businesses, patrons say downtown crime a growing concern

A shooting leaving one dead and more than a dozen patrons injured at a W. Seventh Street bar has highlighted reports of increased crime in the area, according to business owners and patrons.

The Seventh Street Truck Park sits in the heart of a major entertainment district on the edge of downtown St. Paul. The district is home to a stretch of bars and restaurants as well as quirky shops that draw customers from not only the Twin Cities but across the state, with many attending concerts and hockey games at the nearby Xcel Energy Center. It’s also seen an influx of upscale apartments and condominiums in recent years.

Kathy Gosiger, general manager of Tom Reid’s Hockey City Pub on West Seventh, said news of the shooting spread rapidly among bar owners, and her restaurant almost instantly locked its doors and made sure patrons got safely into cars or Ubers. On Sunday, business was lighter than usual given the Minnesota Vikings and Packers games.

“It absolutely impacts us,” she said. “The Truck Park, sadly, is known to have problems. … The police in this city are wonderful, and they’re so disrespected on the street. There’s no leadership coming from the mayor’s office or the city council.”

On the night before at least 14 people were shot, Ramsey County Sheriff Bob Fletcher expressed specific concern about the volume of patrons spilling outside onto the sidewalk. “Quite the gathering here at the Truck Park,” he said, during his Facebook Live cast. “We never had any shots fired right here. I hope we never do. But with this volume, at some point it’s going to happen, right? It’s become a very popular place.”

John Bandemer, a former senior commander with the St. Paul Police Department, is now a director of safety strategies for the St. Paul Downtown Alliance, a coalition of city and business leaders that oversees a centralized communications center.

“The events of last night were tragic and will not be tolerated by the downtown community,” said Bandemer, in a written statement released by the Downtown Alliance. “I’ve been in communication with Chief Axtell and Senior Commander Ellison this morning to offer the help of the Downtown Improvement District’s Safety Communications Center in any way that we can, and have directed all of our on-duty Street Team members to have a heavy presence in that area for the next few days. I have the utmost confidence in Chief Axtell and the St. Paul Police Department in finding justice for the victims.”

Dave Cossetta, owner of Cossetta’s restaurant and grocery across the street from the Seventh Street Truck Park, said crime has been increasing in the neighborhood for some time and “it’s not being addressed” by the city.

“There’s been constant contact from the neighborhood — from the business owners to the residents, (directed to city officials) … They’re constantly telling them all the situations that are going on,” Cossetta said.

He said Freedom House — the drop-in day shelter for the homeless that opened in late 2020 two blocks away at a former fire station — closes each evening and people disperse from there. That generates problems for the area, he said. Other nearby business owners have weighed in, echoing concerns about vagrancy and vandalism, and police chronicled a sizable uptick in thefts and quality of life crimes in the first half of the year compared to 2020.

Citywide, St. Paul’s 32 homicides are on pace to break the annual record of 34 killings set in 1992. Throughout downtown in general, however, crime reports over the summer fell to a five-year-low.

The St. Paul City Council is tentatively scheduled to vote Wednesday on whether to allow more drop-in day shelters for the homeless in business districts and mixed-use zoning areas across the city. The mass shooting provides a difficult backdrop to that vote.

“The problems have been escalating since they started it,” Cossetta said.

Experts who study national crime trends have pointed to increases in violent crime across the U.S. since 2014, though overall numbers are still well below their peak in 1990. In Minneapolis, residents have expressed concern about rising violence, including crime in popular destination areas such as Uptown, where organizers of an annual Greek Festival pulled out in August. In the 1800 block of Nicollet Avenue in Minneapolis, a shootout Wednesday between occupants of two cars resulted in a crash that killed a woman rolling by on a scooter.

Josh Morrison said he left Patrick McGovern’s Pub in St. Paul near closing early Sunday morning and saw officers rolling out police crime scene tape at the Truck Park across the street. He said it was then he decided he’d had enough.

“I’m not going to go back downtown,” said Morrison, a University of Minnesota student who said he was robbed downtown by a group of young men last Wednesday and had a gun pulled on him a month ago. “It hurts my heart. It’s shocking. Life’s a precious thing, why would you wantonly waste it like that?”

Morrison, who moved to the Twin Cities to study at the University of Minnesota, said he had been a repeat victim.

“I had a gun pulled on me a month ago,” Morrison said. “Just being downtown, I know where not to walk. It shouldn’t be that way. Why don’t we have something set up for people to drop their guns off, and have them destroyed, some place where they can get them off the street?”

Early Sunday afternoon, St. Paul Police announced multiple arrests in the mass shooting from the night before. City Council Member Rebecca Noecker, who represents downtown and plans to meet with residents and business owners for a breakfast discussion  this week, released a statement on Sunday praising first responders and investigators for their quick response.

“We will not allow this tragedy to define us or hold us back on our progress to make downtown safe,” she said.

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Avalanche signs defeseman Jack Johnson off professional tryout contract

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Avalanche signs defeseman Jack Johnson off professional tryout contract

The Avalanche on Sunday announced it has signed veteran defenseman Jack Johnson to a one-year contract. Johnson, 34, had been in training camp and preseason with Colorado on a professional tryout contract.

The No. 3 overall selection of the 2005 draft has played in 950 career NHL regular-season games, ranking 22nd all-time among American-born defensemen. He has also played in 30 career Stanley Cup playoff games.

“Jack is a veteran defenseman that we brought into camp to help shore up our depth on the back end,” Avalanche general manager Joe Sakic said in a release. “He provides a steady presence and brings a lot of NHL experience to our team. We like what he has added to our blue line over the past few weeks and we’re pleased to have him on the club as we head into the start of the season.”

Johnson, 6-foot-1 and 227 pounds, played with the New York Rangers last season but appeared in only 13 games after undergoing core muscle surgery. He previously played with the Pittsburgh Penguins, who bought out the final three years of his contract in 2020.

Johnson’s deal with the Avs is worth $750,000, per a league source. He has estimated career earnings of more than $45 million, according to CapFriendly.com.

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