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Free COVID vaccines will be offered at The Rolling Stones concert Sunday

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Free COVID vaccines will be offered at The Rolling Stones concert Sunday

ST. LOUIS – If you’re going to The Rolling Stones concert in St. Louis Sunday night and you don’t have the COIVD-19 vaccination, you will be able to get the shot at the concert.

As The Rolling Stones song says “it’s just a shot away.”

BJC Healthcare has announced it will offer free COVID vaccination shots at the concert. The shots will be given at the first aid room at The Dome at America’s Center.  

The Rolling Stones recently released an Instagram video for fans that strongly encourage COVID vaccines and testing.

The band kick off their 13 dates No Filter tour in St. Louis Sunday night. Masks are required for those attending the concerts. Proof of vaccination or COVID tests are not required, but The Rolling Stones say they got the shot and you should too. 

“We want to make it a great night and a safe one. We’ve all had the shot, and you better get one too. So, if you’re not vaccinated get tested,” members of The Rollings Stone say in the video.

“If they want the masks on, put them on. It’s no big deal. And if you’re experiencing symptoms, like a high temperature or something don’t come to the show. Who knows when we’ll have the chance to spend the night together again.”

The latest data from the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force shows the number of COVID cases in the St. Louis region is decreasing or leveling off. 

New hospital admissions of COVID patients increased from 52 yesterday to 55 today. The number of COVID-positive patients in hospitals decreased from 418 yesterday to 393 today. 

The concert starts at 7:30 Sunday night with an opening act. The Rolling Stones are expected to take the stage at about 8:45 p.m. Free COVID vaccinations will be available at the first aid room at the dome Sunday night 

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Check your onions again: FDA announces more recalls

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Check your onions again: FDA announces more recalls

(File: Getty)

(WEHT) – Earlier this week, the CDC announced that fresh whole onions were the cause of a salmonella outbreak that traced to 37 states across the U.S. and were distributed by ProSource Inc.

The company imported the onions from Chihuahua, Mexico, and distributed them to restaurants and grocery stores throughout the United States. ProSource said the possibly tainted onions were last imported Aug. 27, but because of the vegetable’s long shelf life they may still be on shelves.

Now, two more recalls have been announced involving onions. The FDA is urging people to throw out any onions from HelloFresh and EveryPlate received July 7 through Sep. 8. The companies say they have been informed by one of their suppliers that they’re voluntarily recalling onions due to potential salmonella.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still investigating the nationwide salmonella outbreak that has been linked to onions from Mexico. More than 600 people have reportedly gotten sick; no one has died.

If you are experiencing any symptoms, health officials encourage you to contact your healthcare provider immediately. Click here for more information from the FDA about this supplier recall and the potentially related symptoms.

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Deshaun Watson to the Broncos? One oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance.

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Deshaun Watson to the Broncos? One oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance.

Could the Broncos be getting a new quarterback again?

With a week left before the Nov. 2 NFL trade deadline, one oddsmaker gives Denver a solid chance at landing embattled Texans quarterback Deshaun Watson.

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Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse

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Apple once threatened Facebook ban over Mideast maid abuse

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Two years ago, Apple threatened to pull Facebook and Instagram from its app store over concerns about the platform being used as a tool to trade and sell maids in the Mideast.

After publicly promising to crack down, Facebook acknowledged in internal documents obtained by The Associated Press that it was “under-enforcing on confirmed abusive activity” that saw Filipina maids complaining on the social media site of being abused. Apple relented and Facebook and Instagram remained in the app store.

But Facebook’s crackdown seems to have had a limited effect. Even today, a quick search for “khadima,” or “maids” in Arabic, will bring up accounts featuring posed photographs of Africans and South Asians with ages and prices listed next to their images. That’s even as the Philippines government has a team of workers that do nothing but scour Facebook posts each day to try and protect desperate job seekers from criminal gangs and unscrupulous recruiters using the site.

While the Mideast remains a crucial source of work for women in Asia and Africa hoping to provide for their families back home, Facebook acknowledged some countries across the region have “especially egregious” human rights issues when it comes to laborers’ protection.

“In our investigation, domestic workers frequently complained to their recruitment agencies of being locked in their homes, starved, forced to extend their contracts indefinitely, unpaid, and repeatedly sold to other employers without their consent,” one Facebook document read. “In response, agencies commonly told them to be more agreeable.”

The report added: “We also found recruitment agencies dismissing more serious crimes, such as physical or sexual assault, rather than helping domestic workers.”

In a statement to the AP, Facebook said it took the problem seriously, despite the continued spread of ads exploiting foreign workers in the Mideast.

“We prohibit human exploitation in no uncertain terms,” Facebook said. “We’ve been combating human trafficking on our platform for many years and our goal remains to prevent anyone who seeks to exploit others from having a home on our platform.”

This story, along with others published Monday, is based on disclosures made to the Securities and Exchange Commission and provided to Congress in redacted form by former Facebook employee-turned-whistleblower Frances Haugen’s legal counsel. The redacted versions were obtained by a consortium of news organizations, including the AP.

Taken as a whole, the trove of documents show that Facebook’s daunting size and user base around the world — a key factor in its rapid ascent and near trillion-dollar valuation — also proves to be its greatest weakness in trying to police illicit activity, such as the sale of drugs, and suspected human rights and labor abuses on its site.

Activists say Facebook, based in Menlo Park, California, has both an obligation and likely the means to fully crack down on the abuses their services facilitate as it earns tens of billions of dollars a year in revenue.

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