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Vermont to start administering Pfizer booster shots

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Vermont to start administering Pfizer booster shots

MONTPELIER, Vt. (NEWS10) — Vermont will be administering Pfizer booster shots starting September 24. Currently, Vermonters 80 years of age and older are eligible to schedule and receive boosters.

The schedule for the next age groups is:

  • 75 and older on Monday, September 27
  • 70 and older on Wednesday, September 29
  • 65 and older Friday, October 1

The state will also expand eligibility for booster shots to people aged 18 to 64 with underlying medical conditions on October 1.

“We know that vaccination is the way we’ll beat this pandemic and ensuring as many Vermonters as possible are fully protected is essential,” said Governor Phil Scott. “Vermonters have led the way in our vaccination efforts, and I’m confident they will continue to in this next phase.”

Vermont officials say they are awaiting guidance from the CDC on what occupational or institutional settings at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure should be eligible for booster shots. The state will provide more information based on the recommendations next week.

Eligible Vermonters will only be able to receive a booster shot if they previously received both doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.

Officials say it’s expected that expanded booster shots will be approved for both Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine recipients in the coming weeks.

Eligible Vermonters can go on the state health department website to schedule an appointment at one of the statewide clinics. Residents may also check with their health care provider or local pharmacy to receive a booster shot.

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Dog works full-time at hospital to put children at ease when they get a COVID vaccine

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Dog works full-time at hospital to put children at ease when they get a COVID vaccine

ST. LOUIS – St. Louis Children’s Hospital is helping children feel at ease when they get the COVID-19 vaccine with the help of a four-legged healthcare worker.

Casey the chocolate lab is a full-time employee at St. Louis Children’s Hospital doing what no doctor or nurse can do.

“It made me more relaxed. It took my mind off the shot. It didn’t make me as worried,” said 9-year-old Dani Shetley.

Dani’s mom, Chris Shetley, said she was anxious about the experience.

“She’s been talking about this shot since last night. She’s nervous. She doesn’t like needles,” Chris said.

Casey is making friends among the 5 to 11-year-olds at the hospital’s COVID vaccine clinic.

“So, the dogs bring a sense of normalcy that’s not something you see every day at a doctor or hospital but when we have a dog here it lets them feel that this is not such a scary place,” said Tyler Robertson, a child life specialist at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

The highly obedient, easy-going chocolate lab will sit right by kids when they get the shot.

Ten-year-old Connor High got his vaccine with Casey nearby.

“It was good. It took away lots of stress,” Connor said. “It just takes the pain away, so it doesn’t hurt that much.”

All pediatric vaccine clinics at St. Louis Children’s Hospital are by appointment. Visit BJC.org to schedule an appointment.

Sometimes all it takes is a little shot of courage to get a shot of vaccine with help from man’s or a child’s best friend.

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Preliminary NTSB report released on fatal Kruger Rock plane crash

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NTSB investigating fatal Kruger Rock fire plane crash

The National Transportation Safety Board issued a preliminary federal report into the fatal crash of a single-engine air tanker that was fighting the Kruger Rock fire near Estes Park last month.

“The airplane wreckage was upright and displayed features of a low-speed, nose-down impact
with sloping and wooded terrain,” the report said. “There was no ground scarring that preceded the wreckage.”

Killed in the Nov. 16 crash was Marc Thor Olson, a pilot for CO Fire Aviation, a Fort Morgan company that fights fires from the air. Olson, an Army and Air Force veteran pilot, was using a novel nighttime firefighting technique at the time of the crash. He had more than 42 years of flying experience and had more than 8,000 flight hours logged, including 1,000 hours of using night-vision goggles during combat and civilian air missions.

“Video of the airplane showed the airplane wing’s rocking as it approached the intended drop
location for the aerial firefighting of the Kruger Rock fire,” the report said. “Two witnesses stated that they saw the airplane roll inverted and did not see it descend into terrain. One of the witnesses, who was in radio communication with the pilot, stated that he did not hear the pilot transmit any problems with the airplane nor make any distress calls prior to the accident.”

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Proposed legislation to prevent state, local government in Missouri from requiring COVID vaccine

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Proposed legislation to prevent state, local government in Missouri from requiring  COVID vaccine

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – A Missouri state representative has filed legislation that the sponsor says will strengthen the right of all Missourians to refuse medical treatments, including the COVID vaccine.

State Rep. Bill Hardwick (R-Waynesville) pre-filed HB 1686 for the 2022 legislative session. He says if it is passed, the legislation will prevent the state or any local government in Missouri from requiring anyone to receive the COVID-19 vaccination.

“This bill will mean that no school district can require a child to take the COVID vaccine in order to be in the classroom.  Parents will not have to choose between giving their child a shot they may have concerns about, or their child being forced to learn from home.  It will mean no police officer, no state, county, or city employees will have to make the choice between their jobs and getting a vaccine they don’t want for whatever reason they may have,” said State Rep. Hardwick.

When it comes to those working for private employers, HB 1686 will prevent questioning of a person’s personal religious beliefs of their personal medical circumstances. The bill says exemption requests from employees, including those in companies that are currently being targeted by the Biden Administration, would be granted broadly and without question.

“Your body does not belong to the government and it does not belong to a corporation.  You are the one that should decide if you want the COVID vaccine, that is your decision to make, not someone else’s,” said Representative Hardwick.

The bill now awaits committee assignment by the Speaker of the House when it convenes in 2022.

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