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Battenfeld: Kim Janey now in the ultimate dead-end job

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Battenfeld: Kim Janey now in the ultimate dead-end job

Think you’ve got a dead-end job?

Just imagine how Acting Boston Mayor Kim Janey must feel.

Janey is wrapping up one of the shortest terms ever for a Boston mayor. She’ll soon be a footnote in history next to former Acting Gov. Jane Swift.

Janey’s not even a lame duck — she’s actually worse than a lame duck because she doesn’t even have a term to wrap up. She’s gone after Nov. 16. And after that, until the year wraps up, she’ll be a lame duck councilor. She’s a double lame duck.

While many people have a job they don’t like, Janey actually desperately wanted to keep hers — but unfortunately she came in fourth in the preliminary election, leaving her out of the final.

Your job may be unfulfilling and not very lucrative, but not Janey’s. She has a pretty great, well-paying gig, as long as you don’t mind taking the credit or blame for everything that happens under your watch.

Here’s what Janey will lose in a matter of weeks:

Her $200,000 a year salary. And come January she’ll lose her $100,000-a-year city councilor salary.

Her police chauffeur and her big police SUV. It’s back to driving herself around town, in a car without blue lights and a siren. What a comedown.

The palatial, fifth floor mayor’s office, which has a nice view of Faneuil Hall and Quincy Market.

A private bathroom in the mayor’s office, complete with a shower.

The private elevator, which can take Janey outside behind City Hall in case she wants to make a quick getaway from nosy reporters.

The title of mayor, which Janey relished — refusing to be called what she really is, the acting mayor.

The title of councilor and her other fifth floor office. Pretty soon no one will call her mayor or even acting mayor — or councilor for that matter. She’s just a private citizen like the rest of us.

All those highly paid aides and appointees, like the out-of-town coronavirus czar, who served under Janey. They are on thin ice, because the new mayor is likely to bring in her own team. Time to update those LinkedIn profiles.

That $20,000 a month contract with her political consultant, Doug Rubin. He was well worth the money, don’t you think? Janey should ask for a refund and see whether the attorney general’s consumer protection division can help her.

The ability to command attention at a moment’s notice. Her press conferences will be sparsely attended, to say the least. And her supporters are still waiting for her to show up to her election night party.

No more fawning pieces in the local media. Time to cancel that Globe subscription. And no more of those softball “Mondays with the Mayor” interviews on public radio.

Those special Mayor Kim Janey pencils she handed out to school children. Maybe the kids can scratch out “Mayor.” Throw them in the pile with all the “Office of the Mayor” stationary.

No more being asked about her favorite Dunkin order or her favorite movies, though she could land a part in “The Departed.”

And those well-worn Converse sneakers? They’re already out of style, so maybe it’s time to turn them in and replace them with slippers, which she can wear around the house.

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COVID boosters: Who’s eligible to receive additional Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines

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Boosters, employer mandates drive increase in U.S. COVID vaccines

Coloradans who received COVID-19 vaccines produced by Moderna or Johnson & Johnson have been approved by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to get booster shots under certain conditions, greatly expanding the pool of who can get additional doses.

In August, the CDC approved boosters for people who have suppressed immune systems. A month later came approval for certain people who’d received the Pfizer vaccine.

In addition to approval for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson boosters, the CDC authorized a “mix and match” approach to the shots, noting people may get a different type of vaccine for their booster than their original shot.

The authorization kicks in immediately for anyone eligible to receive boosters.

“For many Coloradans, a booster dose is an important part of maintaining the greatest protection against COVID-19,” said Dr. Eric France, the state’s chief medical officer, in a news release. “People who are eligible should get their booster dose as soon as possible, especially as we approach the holidays and look forward to safely celebrating with our families and friends.”

The state health department said Colorado has “ample inventory” to provide booster shots to those who are eligible while still administering first and second doses to people completing their initial vaccine series.

Eligible Coloradans can receive free COVID-19 vaccines or boosters at any of the more than 1,700 vaccine providers across the state or at one of the state’s mobile vaccination clinics, officials said. No insurance, identification, proof of residency, or proof of medical history is required.

Here’s who is eligible to receive COVID-19 vaccination booster shots:

Immunocompromised people

Late this summer, the CDC approved booster shots for people who had been inoculated with Pfizer or Moderna vaccines and have suppressed immune systems. But the agency declined to authorize the additional doses for the full population.

People qualify for additional doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines because they’re immunocompromised if they:

  • Had an organ transplant at any time, or a recent stem cell transplant
  • Are being treated for cancer
  • Were born with a compromised immune system
  • Have uncontrolled HIV
  • Are being treated with high doses of immune-suppressing drugs
  • Have another condition that can severely affect the immune system, like chronic kidney disease

The CDC’s authorization of additional doses for people who are immunocompromised did not include Johnson & Johnson, but boosters of that vaccine are now allowed for anyone above the age of 18 regardless of health condition.

Pfizer and Moderna vaccine recipients

This week’s CDC approval of Moderna vaccines comes with the same qualifications as the authorization of third doses of Pfizer.

People who are fully vaccinated with Pfizer or Moderna vaccines can get a third shot if they are 65 or older, or if they’re 18 or older and have qualifying health conditions, live in long-term care settings, or work or live in places that put them at higher risk of contracting the virus.

People who meet those conditions are eligible for a booster six months after completing their original vaccination series.

The health conditions that qualify for the Pfizer or Moderna boosters include:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic lung disease, including moderate or severe asthma
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Down syndrome
  • Heart conditions
  • HIV
  • Weakened immune system
  • Liver disease
  • Overweight or obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
  • Current or former smoking
  • Organ or stem cell transplants
  • Stroke or cerebrovascular disease
  • Substance use disorder (addiction)

Johnson & Johnson vaccine recipients

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A triangular block in RiNo slated to become 49-unit, income-restricted condo complex

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A triangular block in RiNo slated to become 49-unit, income-restricted condo complex

A narrow, triangular block in RiNo is slated to be the site of a new 49-unit, income-restricted condominium complex.

The Chestnut Place Condos are planned to have 14 one-bedroom units, 27 two-bedroom units and eight three-bedroom units, as well as one commercial space.

All units will be sold to buyers making at or below 80 percent of the area median income, which is about $55,000 for a single-person household and $64,000 for a two-person household.

According to city documents, Elevation Community Land Trust has promised to buy the land and building when the project is completed. The trust will then sell the units. The 80 percent area median income requirement will last for 99 years.

The land includes two parcels that total 7,010 square feet, or 0.16 acres, that makes up a block formed by Chestnut Place, Arkins Court and 36th Avenue. There is currently one house on the site, which is kitty-corner from Ironton Distillery and across Chestnut Place from Number 38 beer hall.

Lauren DeBell, the chief strategy officer with Elevation Community Land Trust, told BusinessDen that planned amenities at the Chestnut Place Condos include a rooftop deck, bike shop and bike storage, as well as close access to the riverfront promenade Denver is constructing.

DeBell said the immediate area has an “extremely low” 18 percent homeownership rate.

“It is our hope that residents who have been displaced from the Five Points neighborhood will be able to return as homeowners,” she said, “and that current residents who desire to stay long-term but never dreamed they could own a home will have a new opportunity to purchase a beautiful condo where they can gain stability, wealth and a place to call home.”

Provided by the city of Denver

A rendering shows the north and south view of the proposed Chestnut Place Condos.

As BusinessDen previously reported, the land was sold in November to Chestnut Lofts LLC, which has ties to the Urban Land Conservancy, and 3501 Chestnut Land LLC, which has ties to Shanahan Development, the contractor for the project.

The entities paid $1.13 million across two deals for 3501 and 3563 Chestnut Place, according to public records, with the Urban Land Conservancy retaining about a 70 percent interest and the Shanahan Development entity retaining about 30 percent.

“The biggest challenge this development has faced is the site itself,” according to a briefing on the project from the city. “The very narrow, triangular site, currently comprised of two parcels, required an increasingly challenging building form.”

Developers sought a zoning variance to raise the building height for more units, but the Board of Adjustment for Zoning offered only a “partial variance,” the briefing stated. The land is currently zoned for a five-story building, but it’s within a zoning overlay district that lets developers build higher if certain conditions are met.

“Additionally, the existing structure on the site requires asbestos and lead-based paint mitigation during demolition, increasing overall site preparation expenses,” the briefing stated.

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Colorado unemployment rate drops to 5.6% in September, but job gains lag

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Colorado unemployment rate drops to 5.6% in September, but job gains lag

Colorado’s unemployment rate continued to fall in September despite another month of below-average job gains tied to weaker-than-expected hiring in the public sector, according to an update Friday from the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.

The state’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell from 5.9% in August to 5.6% in September, which equates to 10,100 fewer unemployed workers. Colorado ranks 35th for its unemployment rate, which remains stubbornly above the U.S. seasonally-adjusted rate of 4.8%.

Employers in the state added a net 5,100 nonfarm jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis between the middle of August and the middle of September. Before the pandemic, that would be a solid gain, but it is only 42% of the monthly gains averaged earlier this year.

“While that represents a decent number of jobs added, it does fall short of the average from February to July which was 12,000 jobs a month,” said Ryan Gedney, a senior labor economist with the CDLE. In August, the state added a revised 5,000 jobs over July and September wasn’t much better at 5,100.

Gedney declined to attribute the end of enhanced federal unemployment benefits in early September to the drop in the state’s unemployment rate. One of the conditions of receiving unemployment benefits is that recipients must certify they are actively looking for work.

If the state economy keeps adding jobs around last month’s pace, Colorado won’t reach pre-pandemic employment counts until January 2023, said Chris Brown, vice president of policy and research at the Common Sense Institute, in a research note Thursday.

Accounting for population gains, Colorado employers need to add 9,884 jobs a month to get back to pre-pandemic levels by 2023.

“This recovery is like a bad cold, it just seems like it takes forever to get over it,” said Gary Horvath, a Broomfield economist who closely tracks the monthly employment reports.

Gedney said the past two months of weaker employment gains coincide with the rise in COVID-19 cases tied to the delta variant. But for months now, employers have complained they can’t fill openings and that could also be holding back hiring.

Horvath said when he recently tried to schedule a furnace tune-up to get ahead of falling temperatures, he was told the earliest appointment slot was Jan. 25, a sign that technicians are in short supply.

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