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Broncos cruise past Jets for 3-0 start, but now comes the tough stuff — good teams

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Broncos cruise past Jets for 3-0 start, but now comes the tough stuff — good teams

And now comes the tough stuff, the difficult stuff, the challenging stuff.

The Broncos completed the soft underbelly of their schedule with Sunday’s 26-0 pasting of the New York Jets. They are 3-0 for the first time in five years.

But when they meet Monday morning, a stare into the teeth of the AFC will begin.

Week 4: Quarterback/make-something-out-of-nothing master Lamar Jackson leads Baltimore (2-1) into town.

Week 5: Another East Coast trip to Pittsburgh (1-2), which will be playing with heightened urgency after two home losses.

Week 6: Las Vegas (3-0), which has two overtime wins sandwiching an impressive victory at the Steelers, visits for maybe a spot atop the AFC West.

Week 7: Back east for a Thursday night game at Cleveland (2-1), which has nine sacks.

The stench of starting the last two years 0-4 and 0-3 has long been extinguished, a result of the schedule, but also a nod to a roster built better than the 2019-20 editions.

The Broncos and Raiders are tied for the division lead, followed by the Los Angeles Chargers (2-1) and Kansas City (1-2).

“It’s a great group of dudes and as (outside linebacker) Von (Miller) says, we take one play at a time, one day at a time,” left tackle Garett Bolles said. “We have to continue to have that same mindset. We weren’t perfect, but I feel like where we’re at, we’re a hard team to beat.”

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Fatal crash on Jennings Station Road closes street until approximately 4 p.m.

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Fatal crash on Jennings Station Road closes street until approximately 4 p.m.

JENNINGS, Mo. – A fatal crash happened in Jennings Thursday morning just before 5:30 a.m., according to police.

The crash happened at Jennings Station Road and Brookfield Drive. First responders were on the scene. A car struck a pole and flipped several times. It landed on its roof.

Accident reconstruction crews were called to the crash location.

St. Louis County Police Department said in a tweet at 8:37 a.m. that the area will be closed for the next six hours. That means the road will reopen at approximately 4:00 p.m.

FOX 2’s Nissan Rogue Runner reporter Jason Maxwell was on the scene. FOX 2’s traffic reporter Molly Rose monitored closures.

Refresh this story for the latest details.

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Stimulus check update: A fourth payment would be critical for many, study says

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Stimulus check update: A fourth payment would be critical for many, study says

(File/Getty)

(NEXSTAR) – As the U.S. confronts rising inflation, slower job gains and a crippled supply chain, a new study finds that the Americans most in need of a stimulus check at the beginning of the pandemic continue to suffer most.

The three rounds of stimulus checks spanning two presidencies were critical to lower earners, researchers with the Capital One Insights Center found, but didn’t go far enough.

The study started in spring of 2020, with the authors administering surveys to a nationally representative group of Americans every four to eight months to learn more about the virus’ impact, from how they used their stimulus checks to their view of the U.S. economic recovery.

The respondents fell into three annual income groups – less than $25,000, $25,000 – $100,000 and over $100,000. Lower earners were much more likely than other groups to have spent the final stimulus payment on bills, the study found.

Part of the reason for that, researchers said, was the lack of recovery for the nation’s poorest.

A lopsided recovery

The study found that while job and income loss was devastating during the spring 2020 wave of COVID-19 in the U.S., how Americans faired in the year since varied greatly depending on several factors.

During that spring, 32%-36% reported income loss – a number that hasn’t changed much for the lower third of earners. For the other two groups, however, the study found that only half of respondents were still reporting income loss. Underemployment was also 12% more likely among Black and Hispanic/Latinx workers than white workers.

Economic insecurity was also a common theme among middle earners, however. The study found that debt levels were higher for one in five respondents in spring of 2021 than before the pandemic.

In 2020, real incomes and the number of full-time workers were already tumbling.

According to U.S. Census findings, the median household income in the U.S. went down by 2.9% from $69,560 in 2019 to $67,521 in 2020, the first time it had significantly dropped since 2011. The real median earnings fell 1.2% from $42,065 to $41,535, as did the number of full-time workers, which fell by 13.7 million.

Calls for fourth stimulus check

For many Americans, finding the money for looming mortgage, credit card and utility bills is a monthly cycle of anxiety. The study found that in April of 2021, 46% of lower earners said they would have come up short in paying their expenses without the stimulus money.

After the third stimulus check – the $1,400 payment under the American Rescue Plan – that balancing act became tougher for many lower earners. Nearly a third of low earner reported in August 2021 that they had to borrow money from friends and family to take care of their bills.

The cost of childcare compounded the struggle to pay bills for many, with 50% of lower earners and 30% of middle earners saying in August that they were either forced to cut back on working to take care of children or give up their jobs entirely. This is compared to 18% of higher earners.

While it seems unlikely that Congress will approve a fourth round of stimulus checks – as Republicans and Democrats spar over funding the government and the Biden administration’s now-$2 trillion spending package to improve social services and fight climate change – Capital One Insight Center researchers aren’t the only ones calling the stimulus payments critical to the U.S. recovery.

In September, nonpartisan advocacy group The Senior Citizens League (TSCL) warned that the cost of goods and services is rising for people with fixed incomes, months before next year’s federal cost-of-living bump.

Government economic experts estimated recent increases in inflation mean the cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2022 will approach 6%, a whopping jump from the 1.3% COLA awarded for this year.

Now, The Senior Citizens League is mounting a campaign to urge Congress to pass a fourth round of stimulus checks that would send $1,400 payments to Social Security recipients only.

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Showers and storms are expected Thursday, high temps in upper-60s

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Showers and storms are expected Thursday, high temps in upper-60s

St. Louis weather from FOX 2 Meteorologist Linh Truong:

ST. LOUIS – Showers and storms are expected for Thursday. The St. Louis area will continue to see showers and storms Friday as the cold front stalls overhead.

The weekend is looking good with sunny skies and fall-like temperatures in the 60s.

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Lindenwood student dies on campus Wednesday night

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Lindenwood student dies on campus Wednesday night

ST. CHARLES, Mo. – Grief counselors are available at Lindenwood University Thursday after a student was found dead on campus Wednesday night.

The school’s president John R. Porter sent out the notice to students, but it did not include the student’s identity or the cause of death.

“I write with a heavy heart to share news of a student death on campus this evening,” Porter’s email said. “The University has been in close contact with the family and we are asking everyone to respect other’s privacy at this time.”

The student media site lindenlink reported there was police and campus public safety department activity outside Calvert Rogers Hall throughout the night.

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Burger plate recipe: A vintage dish with modern appeal

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Burger plate recipe: A vintage dish with modern appeal

By Eric Kim, The New York Times

She wasn’t your typical grandmother.

Grandma Fern was an Auntie Mame, see-the-world type, the kind of grandmother who would take you to a piano bar or teach you how to play blackjack. Her exuberant personality matched the bustling energy of Pie ’n Burger, the cool restaurant in Pasadena, California, where she would take her grandson Michael Osborn, when he was a child in the 1960s.

Now, decades later, Osborn owns the restaurant.

“For a lot of people, it’s like home,” he said of his 35-seat establishment.

One item on the menu, the hamburger steak plate, has been served for as long as Osborn can remember. But the dish is a bit of a relic — more common on diner menus decades ago — and these days, it can be hard to find.

At Pie ’n Burger, it’s a half-pound of prime ground beef that’s formed into a patty, then cooked on a flat griddle. The plate comes with a salad and hash browns made from potatoes steamed in-house, plus a buttered and toasted bun. Osborn’s diners treat the patty like a steak, eating it with a knife and a fork and adding Worcestershire sauce, Heinz 57 or ketchup for seasoning.

Americans today might ask: Why would anyone order this over a regular bunned hamburger, or even a steak?

“Sometimes at night, people want something other than a sandwich or a burger,” Osborn explained, adding that the burger plate is “a lot more cost effective for a customer than a steak.”

Today, Osborn sells far fewer hamburger steaks than he does the traditional burgers for which his restaurant is known. But he recalls a time, during the heyday of the Atkins diet, when the hamburger steak was all the rage.

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What’s the latest advice on the type of mask I should wear?

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What’s the latest advice on the type of mask I should wear?

NEW YORK — What’s the latest advice on the type of mask I should wear?

It depends on your situation, but health officials say it should cover your nose and mouth, and fit snugly so there aren’t any gaps on the sides of your face.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also says to pick masks with two or more layers and a nose wire to prevent air from leaking out the top. It suggests holding your mask up to check if it blocks light, which means the fabric will probably filter out more particles.

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Norway’s bow-and-arrow killings seen as ‘act of terror’

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Norway’s bow-and-arrow killings seen as ‘act of terror’

By PAAL NORDSETH, JAN M. OLSEN and MARK LEWIS

KONGSBERG, Norway (AP) — Norwegian authorities said Thursday the bow-and-arrow rampage by a man who killed five people in a small town appeared to be a terrorist act, a shocking attack in a Scandinavian country where violent crime is rare.

Police identified the attacker as Espen Andersen Braathen, a 37-year-old Danish citizen, who was arrested Wednesday night. They said he used the bow and arrow and possibly other weapons to randomly target people at a supermarket and other locations in Kongsberg, a town of about 26,000 where he lived, before he was seized by police on the street.

Police said they believe he acted alone.

“The whole act appears to be an act of terror,” said Hans Sverre Sjoevold, head of Norway’s domestic intelligence service, known as the PST.

”We do not know what the motivation of the perpetrator is,” Sjoevold said in English. “We have to wait for the outcome of the investigation.”

He said the suspect was known earlier by the PST, but he declined to elaborate.

Regional Police Chief Ole B. Saeverud described the man as being known as a Muslim convert and said there “earlier had been worries of the man having been radicalized,” but he did not elaborate or say why he was previously flagged or authorities did in response.

Police said four women and one man between the ages of 50 and 70 were killed. Three other people were wounded, police said.

Andersen Braathen is being held on preliminary charges and will face formal charges Friday.

Mass killings are rare in low-crime Norway, and the attack immediately drew comparisons with the country’s worst peacetime slaughter a decade ago, when a right-wing domestic extremist killed 77 people with a bomb, a rifle and a pistol.

People have “experienced that their safe local environment suddenly became a dangerous place,” Norwegian King Harald V said Thursday. “It shakes us all when horrible things happen near us, when you least expect it, in the middle of everyday life on the open street.”

Newly appointed Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Stoere called the attack “horrific.”

“This is unreal. But the reality is that five people have been killed, many are injured and many are in shock,” Gahr Stoere told Norwegian broadcaster NRK.

Police were alerted to a man shooting arrows about 6:15 p.m. and arrested him about 30 minutes later. Regional prosecutor Ann Iren Svane Mathiassen, told The Associated Press that after the man’s arrest, he “clearly described what he had done. He admitted killing the five people.”

Dozens of people saw the killings. Erik Benum, who lives on the same road as the supermarket that was attacked, told The Associated Press that he saw shop workers taking shelter in doorways.

“I saw them hiding in the corner. Then I went to see what was happening, and I saw the police moving in with a shield and rifles. It was a very strange sight,” Benum said.

On Thursday morning, the whole town was eerily quiet, he said.

“People are sad and shocked,” Benum said.

Svane Mathiassen, the prosecutor, said the bow and arrows were just part of the attacker’s arsenal. Police have not said what other weapons were used.

Norwegian media reported that the suspect previously had been convicted of burglary and possession of drugs, and last year a local court granted a restraining order ordering him to stay away from his parents for a six-month period after he threatened to kill one of them.

Svane Mathiassen, who is leading the investigation, told Norwegian broadcaster NRK that the suspect will be assessed by forensic psychiatric experts Thursday.

“This is not unusual in such serious cases,” she was quoted as saying.

PST said Thursday that the terror threat level for Norway remains unchanged and was considered “moderate.” The main church in Kongsberg was open to anyone in need of support.

“I don’t think anyone expects to have these kinds of experiences. But nobody could imagine this could happen here in our little town,” parish priest Reidar Aasboe told the AP.

___

Olsen reported from Copenhagen, Denmark, and Lewis from London.

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Editorial: Vote no on Proposition 119

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Editorial: Vote no on Proposition 119

Proposition 119 will fund before- and after-school care for low-income children in Colorado by imposing an additional 5% sales tax on marijuana and taking some money that would otherwise go to an investment trust used for traditional education funding.

State Sen. Rhonda Fields and former state Sen. Mike Johnston make a compelling argument that the state should step up and help struggling families afford high-quality tutoring and care for children during the working hours when kids are not in school.

However, the proposal has a major flaw – it doesn’t actually identify the high-quality tutoring and programming for kids that would receive approximately $137 million. Proposition 119 would set up a public board similar to other boards in the state with appointed members to oversee public funds. That board, known as LEAP, would be tasked with approving and identifying care providers. Those care providers would then likely appeal to parents — who qualify based on their income — to send their children to a specific nearby program.

We fear that unscrupulous online education providers will pounce on this opportunity to obtain public funds to offer extremely little in the way of educational attainment, or even child care for that matter.

And while there are quality tutoring programs out there that would love to accept state funding so they can tutor low-income children, the reality is that many of those entities will likely remain private because they have more demand than they can fill as it is.

Instead, the applicants to the newly created LEAP board could be pop-up, non-profits promising quality care but really providing glorified babysitting that is already available before and after school in many districts for a nominal and often subsidized cost.

If voters do approve this “sin” tax, we hope that we are proven wrong. There is the possibility that school teachers would step up to provide this tutoring. In fact, at the outset teachers and other school employees are the only authorized individuals able to accept LEAP funds.

Teachers are dedicated to their students and go above and beyond to help struggling kids keep up in school. We love the idea of teachers being able to make that before-school and after-school work formal and to be compensated for their good and extra work. Teachers are already spread thin and underpaid; asking them to take on additional tutoring, especially if the hourly pay comes out to be less than what they make teaching, is not fair. And teachers’ unions have opposed this proposition.

Johnston and Fields envision that the giants in afterschool care would expand, amplify and improve their programs using LEAP funding. For example, YMCA, Boys and Girls Club, Discovery Link in Denver Public Schools or the before- and after-school programs in Aurora Public Schools could step up to fill this need using state dollars to expand.

So much of whether or not LEAP would be a success or a failure would depend on the service providers approved and the ability of low-income parents to navigate the system for applying for the funds and accessing those providers.

It’s a gamble we encourage voters not to make.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Social Security increase: More cash on the way for seniors

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Social Security increase: More cash on the way for seniors

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Millions of Americans on Social Security will soon have more money in their pockets. Retirees will get a 5.9% increase in benefits for 2022. That’s the highest cost-of-living adjustment in nearly 40 years.

The increase in benefits is due to inflation. Prices are very high for items such as food and gas, and supply chain issues continue to drive up the cost of goods.

The cost-of-living adjustment (or COLA, as it’s commonly called) amounts to an added $92 a month for the average retired worker, according to estimates Wednesday from the Social Security Administration. It’s an abrupt break from a long lull in inflation that saw cost-of-living adjustments averaging just 1.65% a year over the past 10 years.

With the increase, the estimated average Social Security payment for a retired worker will be $1,657 a month next year. A typical couple’s benefits would rise by $154 to $2,753 per month.

“Any help we can provide, particularly for those living on fixed income, is so crucial key at this moment in time,” said Tom Hunter, Associate State Director of AARP West Virginia.

Social Security impacts about one in five Americans nationwide, about 70 million people.

About half of seniors live in households where Social Security benefits account for at least 50% of their income, and one-quarter rely on their monthly payment for all or nearly all their earnings. For this latter group, the COLA can literally make a difference in what they’re able to put on the table.

“We urge policymakers to work together to ensure the long-term solvency and adequacy of social security moving forward,” Hunter said.

Increased payments to SSI beneficiaries will begin on Dec. 30, 2021.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Broncos podcast: Mike Shanahan talks Ring of Fame induction, Super Bowl teams, coaching John Elway and more

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Broncos podcast: Mike Shanahan talks Ring of Fame induction, Super Bowl teams, coaching John Elway and more

In this special edition of the 1st & Orange podcast presented by SI Sportsbook, Denver Post sportswriter Ryan O’Halloran sits down with two-time Super Bowl champion Broncos coach Mike Shanahan.

On Sunday, Shanahan will be inducted into the Broncos’ Ring of Fame during halftime against the Las Vegas Raiders. Shanahan looks back on what made the Broncos’ back-to-back Super Bowl teams successful in addition to speaking about his journey in Denver alongside Hall of Famers John Elway, Steve Atwater, Champ Bailey and Pat Bowlen.

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