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Northumberland man charged with vehicular assault, DWI, leaving scene

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Northumberland man charged with vehicular assault, DWI, leaving scene

(iSeeCars) – Getting your engine oil changed regularly is one of the most important things you can do for your vehicle. Not only does this routine maintenance extend the life of your engine, but it also prevents most powertrain warranties from becoming null and void. There are lots of places that offer this service, but not all oil changes are created equal. What are the best places to get an oil change? We break down the options to help you make this important decision. 

When you get your oil changed, the engine oil and the filter should both be replaced. While it isn’t a requirement, if you don’t change the filter, the new oil will go in clean and come out dirty, negating much of the point of an oil change. A standard oil change typically includes a chassis lube, new oil, and a new filter, along with draining the old oil and replacing it with new oil, replacing the filter, and lubricating the chassis.

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Surveys to determine if tornadoes hit southwestern Missouri

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Surveys to determine if tornadoes hit southwestern Missouri

GOLDEN CITY, Mo. (AP) — The National Weather Service says crews are heading out to rural areas in southwestern Missouri to determine if tornadoes caused damage being reported overnight. Weather radar indicated possible tornadoes near Neosho and Golden City before dawn Monday.

Doug Cramer is a National Weather Service meteorologist in Springfield. He says vague reports of damage from those areas in Jasper and Newton counties have come in, but there have been no reports of injuries.

Cramer says the storms have dissipated and residents in the region can expect clear skies late Monday and all day Tuesday until storms likely return again on Wednesday.

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Amid offensive slump, Broncos coach Vic Fangio has “no qualms” with play-caller Pat Shurmur

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Broncos Report Card: All units took turns making mistakes in loss to Pittsburgh

In the midst of an offensive slump — three touchdowns in the last 26 possessions dating back to halftime of the Week 3 win over the New York Jets — Broncos coach Vic Fangio threw his support behind embattled play-caller Pat Shurmur on Monday.

“I have no qualms with Pat other than our results haven’t been good enough and we have to find a way to fix that,” Fangio said.

The Broncos (3-2) have sunk to last on third down (28.6%), 29th in the red zone touchdown rate (42.1%) and 24th in scoring (20.4).

The offense had four three-and-out possessions in Weeks 1-3 and five in the losses to Baltimore and Pittsburgh.

Sunday’s 27-19 loss to Pittsburgh got off to a funky start when the Broncos were called for their first delay of game penalty of the season … on their first snap.

“We just lost sight of the play-clock there in the change of possession got surprised by it,” Fangio said. “It shouldn’t happen, but it did.”

The lack of production offensively in the first half convinced Fangio to send kicker Brandon McManus out for a 39-yard field goal on fourth-and-2 from the 21 and trailing 7-0.

“I did (consider going for it), but we hadn’t been moving it very well and I wanted to get some points,” Fangio said.

Darby rationale. The Broncos activated cornerback Ronald Darby (hamstring) from injured reserve on Saturday, but he was a scratch for the game.

“The reason we activated him was because there was some still question with Pat (Surtain II) and his (chest) injury,” Fangio said. “In Darbs’ case, he had only a little bit of practice (three days) and the medical people had him on a pitch count last week, which we adhered to, and he didn’t feel like he was quite grooved-in so we were hoping we didn’t have to play him.”

Fangio is hopeful Darby can play against Las Vegas.

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No summons issued after Reign violated close order

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Reign to close for year; city says it’s ‘a threat to public safety’

ST. LOUIS– The St. Louis City Counselor is looking into a Friday incident at the Reign restaurant after it held a small event despite being ordered to close.

Interim Public Safety Director Dan Isom said there were about 16-20 people at the event and the owner was not present at the time.

Isom said the event was held despite the restaurant not having a liquor or occupancy license. He said there were no arrests or summons issued.

Last month, the St. Louis Department of Public Safety ordered Reign to close and be boarded up for a year citing that it is “a threat to public safety and welfare of the residents in this community.”

Once the nuisance order was posted, Reign has 30 days to vacate, according to city documents.

The decision came after a public nuisance abatement hearing held Sept. 20 where the police linked a series of shootings and assaults at Reign in August and early September.

In September, Reign’s liquor license was suspended after video evidence surfaced of a shootout that took place in December of last year.

A hearing is scheduled for this Thursday.

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Ameren announces changes in leadership, including next CEO

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Ameren announces changes in leadership, including next CEO

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The longtime chief executive officer for Ameren Corp. will become executive chairman, and another veteran of the utility will become CEO. St. Louis-based Ameren announced Monday that Marty Lyons will replace Warner Baxter as president and CEO starting Jan. 1.

Lyons joined Ameren in 2001 as vice president and controller. He served as chief financial officer for a decade and is currently president of Ameren Missouri.

Under the new arrangement, Baxter will remain an employee of Ameren, and Lyons will report to him. Baxter has been with Ameren since 1995 and has been president and CEO since 2014.

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Pedestrian killed near stadium after leaving Chiefs’ game

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Pedestrian killed near stadium after leaving Chiefs’ game

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A pedestrian from Kansas is dead after being struck by two hit-and-run drivers near Arrowhead Stadium as the man was leaving the Kansas City Chiefs game. Police are searching for the drivers who fled the scene Sunday night. The victim was a 66-year-old man from Wichita, Kansas.

Police say the man and another person left the game early, so traffic crews were not yet on the scene to assist with exiting. The second person was not struck. Police say the victim was struck by a vehicle and while lying in the roadway was run over by a second vehicle. The man died at a hospital.

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Changed race, familiar result: Kenyans sweep Boston Marathon

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Changed race, familiar result: Kenyans sweep Boston Marathon

By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) — With fall foliage replacing the blooming daffodils and mylar blankets sharing space with masks, the pandemic-delayed Boston Marathon returned Monday after a 30-month absence for a smaller, socially distanced race that ended in a very familiar way.

Benson Kipruto and Diana Kipyogei completed a Kenyan sweep — the eighth since 2000 at the world’s oldest and most prestigious 26.2-miler, which moved from its traditional spring date for the first time in its 125-year history because of the coronavirus outbreak.

“We were injured, wounded. Now is the comeback story,” said 2014 winner Meb Keflezighi, one of the past champions sharing grand marshal duties with hospital employees who worked through the pandemic. “Hopefully this is an example that post-pandemic, life is getting back to normal.”

Although organizers put runners through COVID-19 protocols and asked spectators to keep their distance, there were still sizable crowds in spots from Hopkinton to Boston after an early drizzle cleared and temperatures rose into the 60s.

Participants in the field of 18,000 — down from more than 30,000 in pre-pandemic days — needed to test negative for the coronavirus or prove they were vaccinated before picking up their bib numbers. Masks were required indoors in Boston and on the buses out to the start; they also were handed out along with the finishers’ medals and fruit on Boylston Street.

The race also began earlier and with a rolling send-off to avoid the usual crowding in the starting corrals and on the course.

None of the changes proved a problem for the Kenyans.

“There’s not a lot different on the course,” Kipruto said.

A winner in Prague and Athens who finished 10th in Boston in 2019, Kipruto broke away from the lead pack as it turned onto Beacon Street with about three miles to go and broke the tape in 2 hours, 9 minutes, 51 seconds. Lemi Berhanu, who won the race in 2016, was second, 46 seconds back; Colin Bennie of Princeton, Massachusetts, was the top American, in seventh.

Kipyogei claimed the women’s title, a gilded olive wreath and the $150,000 first prize, finishing in 2:24:45 in her major marathon debut. Edna Kipligat, the 2017 winner, was second, 23 seconds behind.

Marcel Hug won the men’s wheelchair race despite making a wrong turn in the final mile, finishing the slightly detoured route just seven seconds off his course record in 1:08:11. Manuela Schär, also from Switzerland, won the women’s wheelchair race in 1:35:21.

Hug, who has raced Boston eight times and has five victories here, cost himself a $50,000 course record bonus when he missed the second-to-last turn, following the lead vehicle instead of turning from Commonwealth Avenue onto Hereford Street.

“At the moment I’m really upset,” said Hug, who finished second in the Chicago Marathon by 1 second on Sunday. “I hope in an hour, two hours, I’ll feel more happy.”

Kipruto waited out an early breakaway by CJ Albertson, who led by as many as two minutes at the halfway point but slowed in the Newton Hills and fell behind near Boston College. Albertson, who is the world record-holder in the 50K (42.2 miles), finished 10th.

A Fresno, California, native, Albertson said he tried to keep things interesting during the pandemic by binging on Peloton classes; he finished atop the leaderboard 57 times and also set a record by running a 2:09 marathon on the treadmill.

“I was just bored and unmotivated, trying to find something to do. I just made stuff up,” he said. “Having a race like Boston … actually racing and competing with the world’s best in one of the best atmospheres there is to run in — second to Fresno — nothing else compares. This was an amazing day.”

Recreational runners streamed across the Back Bay finish line into the afternoon, turning to the sidewalks and pumping their arms to prompt the thinner crowds alongside the course to cheer.

On Boylston Street, spectators lined up shoulder to shoulder, with few wearing masks; Boston requires them indoors. Some said they weren’t concerned about COVID-19 since they were vaccinated and outside.

A rolling start and shrunken field allowed for social distancing on the course, as organizers tried to manage a changing pandemic that forced them to cancel the race last year for the first time since a group of Bostonians returned from the 1896 Athens Olympics and decided to stage a marathon of their own.

Since then, the race has persisted through World Wars and even the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. But it was first postponed, then canceled last year, then postponed from the spring in 2021.

It’s the first time the event hasn’t been held in April as part of the Patriots’ Day holiday that commemorates the start of the Revolutionary War. To recognize Indigenous Peoples Day, race organizers honored 1936 and ’39 winner Ellison “Tarzan” Brown and three-time runner-up Patti Catalano Dillon, a member of the Mi’kmaq tribe.

Police were visible along the course as authorities vowed to remain vigilant eight years after the bombings that killed three spectators and maimed hundreds of others on Boylston Street near the Back Bay finish line.

A light rain greeted participants at the Hopkinton Green, where about 30 uniformed members of the Massachusetts National Guard were the first to leave, at 6 a.m. The men’s and women’s wheelchair racers — some of whom completed the 26.2-mile (42.2 km) distance in Chicago a day earlier — left shortly after 8 a.m., followed by the men’s and women’s professional fields.

“We took things for granted before COVID-19. It’s great to get back to the community and it puts things in perspective,” said National Guard Capt. Greg Davis, 39, who was walking with the military group for the fourth time. “This is a historic race, but today is a historic day.”

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Associated Press writers Jennifer McDermott in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, and Collin Binkley in Boston contributed to this report.

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Broncos guard Graham Glasgow details experience with Atrial fibrillation: “I felt like I had to move my pads away from my chest”

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Broncos guard Graham Glasgow details experience with Atrial fibrillation: “I felt like I had to move my pads away from my chest”

Graham Glasgow knew something wasn’t right with his heart.That feeling came over him on the Broncos’ second offensive series in their season opener at MetLife Stadium when the right guard felt like his heart was beating out of his chest.

He continued to battle that feeling the entire game before being pulled for the final series. By the time he was taken by ambulance to a local hospital after the win over the Giants, the medical staff determined Glasgow had gone into Atrial fibrillation (known as A-fib).

“I felt like I had to move my pads away from my chest to make room for (my heart beating),” Glasgow said Monday. “I didn’t really know what it was — I thought it was maybe an anxiety attack, but I’ve never had one of those either. Then I thought maybe it was an asthma attack, because it was difficult to breathe.”

That wasn’t the only adversity Glasgow has faced in his second year in Denver.

Glasgow missed the Broncos’ Week 2 win over the Jaguars while recovering from A-fib, then hurt his knee in the third quarter of the Week 3 home opener against the Jets. That shelved the 29-year-old for the rest of the game and for Week 4 against the Ravens. He played his first full game of 2021 on Sunday in Pittsburgh, where he surrendered a third-quarter sack to Henry Mondeaux, one of two Denver gave up.

The right guard showed enough in the 27-19 loss to the Steelers to get a passing grade from coach Vic Fangio.

“I thought overall (his performance) was fine, especially coming back from the injury,” Fangio said. “He’s had a choppy season here health-wise, and I’m sure it’s affected him. But he’s a pro, and if he’s out there, he’s capable of playing.”

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Nebraska OL Teddy Prochazka out for season with knee injury

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Nebraska OL Teddy Prochazka out for season with knee injury

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska offensive lineman Teddy Prochazka will miss the rest of the season because of a knee injury.

The freshman was hurt in the 32-29 loss to Michigan on Saturday, his second start at left tackle. Coach Scott Frost said Prochazka would have surgery next week and should return for spring practice.

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Merck asks US FDA to authorize promising anti-COVID pill

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Merck asks US FDA to authorize promising anti-COVID pill

By MATTHEW PERRONE

WASHINGTON (AP) — Drugmaker Merck asked U.S. regulators Monday to authorize its pill for treating COVID-19 in what would add an entirely new and easy-to-use weapon to the world’s arsenal against the pandemic.

If cleared by the Food and Drug Administration — a decision that could come in a matter of weeks — it would be the first pill shown to treat the illness. All other FDA-backed treatments against COVID-19 require an IV or injection.

An antiviral pill that people could take at home to reduce their symptoms and speed recovery could prove groundbreaking, easing the crushing caseload on U.S. hospitals and helping to curb outbreaks in poorer countries with weak health care systems. It would also bolster the two-pronged approach to the pandemic: treatment, by way of medication, and prevention, primarily through vaccinations.

The FDA will scrutinize company data on the safety and effectiveness of the drug, molnupiravir, before rendering a decision.

Merck and its partner Ridgeback Biotherapeutic said they specifically asked the agency to grant emergency use for adults with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 who are at risk for severe disease or hospitalization. That is roughly the way COVID-19 infusion drugs are used.

“The value here is that it’s a pill so you don’t have to deal with the infusion centers and all the factors around that,” said Dr. Nicholas Kartsonis, a senior vice president with Merck’s infectious disease unit. “I think it’s a very powerful tool to add to the toolbox.”

The company reported earlier this month that the pill cut hospitalizations and deaths by half among patients with early symptoms of COVID-19. The results were so strong that independent medical experts monitoring the trial recommended stopping it early.

Side effects were similar between patients who got the drug and those in a testing group who received a dummy pill. But Merck has not publicly detailed the types of problems reported, which will be a key part of the FDA’s review.

Top U.S. health officials continue to push vaccinations as the best way to protect against COVID-19.

“It’s much, much better to prevent yourself from getting infected than to have to treat an infection,” Dr. Anthony Fauci said while discussing Merck’s drug last week.

Still, some 68 million eligible Americans remain unvaccinated, underscoring the need for effective drugs to control future waves of infection.

The prospect of a COVID-19 pill comes amid other encouraging signs: New cases per day in the U.S. have dropped below 100,000 on average for the first time in over two months, and deaths are running at about 1,700 a day, down from more than 2,000 three weeks ago.

Also, the average number of vaccinations dispensed per day has climbed past 1 million, an increase of more than 50% over the past two weeks, driven by the introduction of booster shots and workplace vaccine requirements.

Still, heath authorities are bracing for another possible surge as cold weather drives more people indoors.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, health experts have stressed the need for a convenient pill. The goal is for something similar to Tamiflu, the 20-year-old flu medication that shortens the illness by a day or two and blunts the severity of symptoms like fever, cough and stuffy nose.

Three FDA-authorized antibody drugs have proved highly effective at reducing COVID-19 deaths, but they are expensive, hard to produce and require specialty equipment and health professionals to deliver.

Assuming FDA authorization, the U.S. government has agreed to buy enough of the pills to treat 1.7 million people, at a price of roughly $700 for each course of treatment. That’s less than half the price of the antibody drugs purchased by the U.S. government — over $2,000 per infusion — but still more expensive than many antiviral pills for other conditions.

Merck’s Kartsonis said in an interview that the $700 figure does not represent the final price for the medication.

“We set that price before we had any data, so that’s just one contract,” Kartsonis said. “Obviously we’re going to be responsible about this and make this drug as accessible to as many people around the world as we can.”

Kenilworth, New Jersey-based Merck has said it is in purchase talks with governments around the world and will use a sliding price scale based on each country’s economic means. Also, the company has signed licensing deals with several Indian generic drugmakers to produce low-cost versions of the drug for lower-income countries.

Several other companies, including Pfizer and Roche, are studying similar drugs and are expected to report results in the coming weeks and months. AstraZeneca is also seeking FDA authorization for a long-acting antibody drug intended to provide months of protection for patients who have immune-system disorders and do not adequately respond to vaccination.

Some experts predict various COVID-19 therapies eventually will be prescribed in combination to better protect against the worst effects of the virus.

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The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Best of the West College Football Top 25: Can CU Buffs, CSU Rams pull off something they haven’t done for nearly 780 days?

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Best of the West College Football Top 25: Can CU Buffs, CSU Rams pull off something they haven’t done for nearly 780 days?

Where were you on Sept. 7, 2019?

Back to that date in a second.

Let’s be frank: Outside of Golden, Laramie and the Academy, it’s been a patchy first seven weeks to the college football season along the Front Range. While the new Ralphie can run with the best of them, the new Buffs have stumbled. Rams faithful who expected a 2-0 start at home were greeted by feisty Jackrabbits and a cold shower.

But hope is on the way, kids. Before we present the latest installment of The Denver Post’s Best of the West College Football Top 25 here at DenverPost.com, a friendly public service announcement:

Front Range college football fans actually have something to look forward to Saturday. Well, besides basketball season.

CU (1-4) is favored at home by 7.5 points, according to BetMGM.com, for a visit against 0-5 Arizona. CSU (2-3) is a 10-point favorite, the same sports book says, heading into its visit to 2-4 New Mexico a few hours later.

What’s the significance? If form holds — and neither the ‘Cats and Lobos are great shakes — we could be staring at something we haven’t seen around here in more than two years:

The Buffs and Rams winning a football game on the same day.

The last time that happened? Sept. 7, 2019.

It’s been that stinking long. Blame TV schedules. (CSU last fall beat Wyoming in a Thursday night game on Nov. 5; CU opened the season with a win over UCLA two days later.) Blame the pandemic. Blame the 2019 football season in general. Blame Mike Bobo. Blame Mel Tucker.

Remember Mel? In Week 2 of the ’19 campaign, his Buffs rallied for a thrilling 34-31 home overtime win over Nebraska. At roughly the same time, CSU was knocking the stuffing out of Western Illinois, 38-13, at Canvas Stadium.

As of Monday morning, it had been 765 days since both drank from the sweet cup of victory on the same afternoon. Time to put that little streak to bed, don’t you think? No pressure, Buffs and Rams. No. Pressure.

As to the business at hand, Oregon (4-1) is your new (old?) No. 1 in The Denver Post Best of the West College Football poll, which each Monday ranks the top 25 FBS programs from the Front Range to the Pacific Ocean, as culled from the Pac-12, the Mountain West and BYU. Post columnist Sean Keeler (@SeanKeeler), Post deputy sports editor Matt Schubert (@MattDSchubert) and Post reporter Kyle Fredrickson (@KyleFredrickson) vote on the top 25.

The rest of the latest rankings follow, with in-state squads listed in bold:

THE DENVER POST BEST OF THE WEST TOP 25 POLL — OCT. 11

School Previous Up next
1. Oregon (4-1) *(2) 2 vs. California, Fri.
2. Arizona State (5-1) *(1) 3 at Utah
3. BYU (5-1) 1 at Baylor
4. San Diego State (5-0) 5 at San Jose State, Fri.
▲5. Utah (3-2) 13 vs. Arizona State
6. Nevada (4-1) 7 vs. Hawaii
7. UCLA (4-2) 8 at Washington
8. Air Force (5-1) 9 at Boise State
9. Boise State (3-3)
15 vs. Air Force
10. Stanford (3-3) 6 at Washington State
▼11. Oregon State (4-2) 4 BYE
12. Fresno State (4-2) 12 at Wyoming
13. Utah State (3-2) 14 at UNLV
14. Wyoming (4-1) 10 vs. Fresno State
15. USC (3-3) 11 BYE
16. Hawaii (3-3) 16 at Nevada
17. Washington (2-3) 18 vs. UCLA
18. Washington State (3-3) 19 vs. Stanford
19. CSU (2-3) 20 at New Mexico
20. California (1-4)
21 at Oregon, Fri.
21. San Jose State (3-3) 17 vs. San Diego State, Fri.
22. New Mexico (2-4)
23 vs. Colorado State
23. Colorado (1-4) 22 vs. Arizona
24. Arizona (0-5) 24 at Colorado
25. UNLV (0-5) 25 vs. Utah State

*First-place votes in parenthesis

▲= Biggest climb of the week
▼= Biggest drop of the week
The next Best of the West poll will post Monday, Oct. 18.

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