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Artist chosen to replace Confederate windows in Washington National Cathedral

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Artist chosen to replace Confederate windows in Washington National Cathedral

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WASHINGTON (NXSTTV) — Washington National Cathedral announced Thursday it has chosen contemporary artist Kerry James Marshall, renowned for his wide-ranging works depicting African American life, to design new stained-glass windows with themes of racial justice that will replace a set with Confederate imagery that was removed in 2017.

The landmark sanctuary said in a statement that the four windows will tell “a new and more complete” story of the nation’s racial history. Poet Elizabeth Alexander will write a poem to be inscribed in stone tablets alongside the windows, overlaying older ones that venerated the lives of Confederate soldiers.

The project is expected to be completed by 2023.

The windows will replace a set that honored two Confederate generals, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, with saint-like reverence and had included a Confederate flag. The cathedral removed them in 2017, prompted by a larger national reckoning over Confederate imagery and white supremacy in the wake of deadly right-wing attacks in Charlottesville, Virginia, that year and in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015. The window openings have been covered with plywood since 2017.

The setting is particularly significant in the massive neo-Gothic cathedral, which is filled with iconography depicting the American story in glass, stone, and other media, with images ranging from presidents to famous cultural figures and state symbols.

The cathedral, also the seat of the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop and Diocese of Washington, regularly serves as the setting for ceremonies tied to major national events. In replacing the windows, the cathedral acknowledged a need to correct what it called a “false narrative of what America once was.”

The old windows “were a barrier to our mission and impediment to worship in this place, and they had no place being in sacred space,” the Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, dean of the cathedral, said in a Thursday news conference. “This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the cathedral to not only create beautiful art but to stake a claim about what and who we value,” he added.

Marshall, who made his first visit to the cathedral this week, said it’s too soon to say what the new windows will look like. “It was really important for me to come here and really get a sense of what the place is, what’s already here, what the mission they’ve tried to accomplish is, and then how I might be able to fit whatever it is the cathedral needs in order to fulfill its ambition for these windows … into that space,” he said at the news conference.

He noted that the cathedral set a “monumental” goal of having the windows depict the pain as well as the dignity of “the African-American struggle for justice and equality.” He said, “This is something that’s actually going to take a lot of time, because history itself, as most people know, is a very complicated narrative.”

Hollerith called Marshall “one of the greatest artists of our time” and praised Alexander as “one of our nation’s most eloquent and compelling voices.”

This will be Marshall’s first work in the stained-glass medium after a long and acclaimed career using a variety of media to create portraits and other works depicting Black life. Marshall was a MacArthur Fellow in 1997.

Alexander, president of the Mellon Foundation, recited one of her poems at the 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama and has published multiple books including Pulitzer Prize finalists. She said in a statement that she was honored to be part of the cathedral’s “effort to ensure that those who worship within its sanctuary know that it is truly a space for all people, and that the stories relayed through its sacred walls, windows, and other iconography represent the truth of our nation.”

The cathedral has loaned the Robert E. Lee window to the National Museum of African American History and Culture for a new exhibit, “Make Good the Promises: Reconstruction and Its Legacies.” The museum said the window represents the “myth-building and the nationwide intimidation of African Americans through the embrace of Confederate symbols.”

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Massachusetts hiker collapses and dies in New Hampshire

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Massachusetts hiker collapses and dies in New Hampshire

FRANCONIA, N.H. (AP) — A hiker collapsed on the Lonesome Lake Trail in Franconia and died Saturday, the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department said.

The department was notified Saturday morning that a hiker was receiving CPR on the trail. The 53-year-old man from Beverly, Massachusetts was hiking with a partner when he suddenly collapsed one mile from the trailhead.

Two emergency medical technicians were hiking the same trail and immediately started performing CPR, but they could not revive the hiker.

Conservation officers and rescue volunteers from the Pemigewasset Valley Search and Rescue team brought the hiker back to the trailhead. The man’s name was not released publicly because his family was still being notified.

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Real World Economics: Global corporate taxes are a good step

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Real World Economics: When good intentions go bad

Usually, international finagling among rich people and corporations to minimize paying taxes, legally or illegally, is not visible to the eye.

Edward Lotterman

Occasionally it is. On a trip to Switzerland, my wife and I went for lunch in the neighboring country of Liechtenstein. We started in Chur, a pleasant regional Swiss city in the Rhine Valley. An impulsive query of a hotel clerk told us that all we needed to do to visit another country was to drive 20 miles on the freeway, turn right at the big McDonald’s sign, cross the bridge, one left, one right and we would be in the business heart of Vaduz, tiny Liechtenstein’s capital.

A neat town the size of Redwood Falls, its only notable difference from a Swiss burg was a zone of six or eight blocks on two streets jammed with small, neat office buildings closely adjoining others. Each had small brass plaques next to the doorbell, 20 in one case. Such are the Liechtenstein “headquarters” of hundreds of international businesses.

I had seen similar plaque-bedecked buildings in Barbados on a much smaller scale. Yet I don’t think I’ll see any in Sioux Falls, although the South Dakota Legislature is drumming up analogous businesses.

All this relates to a positive recent development: the agreement among 130 countries to coordinate taxation of corporations, including a minimum global tax of 15 percent. This may reduce the legal contortions so benefitting brass plaque engravers.

Let’s step back a bit: The general problem is the world has some 200 countries, each sovereign over laws seen as best benefiting the country’s and its citizens’ and residents’ needs. This can include earning a few million dollars or euros by writing laws that allow businesses in other countries to in turn save billions in taxes. This is little different from Liberia and Panama offering near-regulation-free registration of commercial ships for a modest price.

There are thousands of businesses, mostly incorporated, that do legitimate business in multiple countries. There are thousands of rich people too. Naturally they try to minimize taxes owed. This can include juggling funds between countries to lower total taxes owed or paid.

This can be, and usually is, legal — at least within the letter of the law. This is “tax avoidance,” and is little different from what accountants might tell any of us.

There also is “tax evasion,” or fraud, in which laws are broken. Sometimes this is from otherwise legitimate businesses. Other times it’s hiding dirty money garnered from government corruption, criminal activity or simple personal crime.

The global agreement just reached aims to reduce avoidance strategies by legal companies, not crime, but the incentives and mechanisms for legal avoidance overlap those for illegal acts.

For example, Minnesota’s own Medtronic has its “legal headquarters” in Dublin, Ireland, even though its “operational headquarters” remains in Fridley. Johnson Controls is another major U.S. business nominally headquartered in Ireland. And hundreds of other corporations still legally based from this country have subsidiaries in Ireland. This has been part of the Celtic boom that propelled Ireland from poverty to prosperity.

Many also may have wholly-owned subsidiaries in Liechtenstein, Panama, Bermuda the Bahamas or similar havens. Frequently these have some innocuous name that gives no indication of the true owner. Transfers between subsidiaries of one corporation across several countries can move money so that low or even zero income taxes are paid.

In 2017, Google reportedly moved $22 billion in income to a Dutch company that transferred it to an Irish company, but one with a subsidiary in Bermuda. Bermuda has no tax on income. The Bermuda entity can “loan” funds back to Google’s home office in California, funds on which no U.S. corporate income tax was ever paid. All of the entities involved were owned 100 percent by Google and under their exclusive control.

So how does one transfer money in this way? Usually, it is through an old dodge known as “transfer pricing” already common and legal when much multinational business was in manufacturing.

For years, my favorite surplus machinery outlet in south Minneapolis had dozens of metal skids marked “Return to Ford, Taubate BR.” The St. Paul Highland Park Ford plant used four-cylinder engines produced in one of Ford’s Brazilian factories. Ford do Brasil is a separately-chartered Brazilian corporation owned entirely by the Michigan-based parent.

So when Ford-Brasil sells to U.S. Ford, money must change hands, but at what price per engine? There is no market price for these as there is for the soybeans Cargill trades, for example.

Set this transfer price high and it increases Ford profits in Brazil but reduces them in the U.S. Ford as a whole has more income here and less in Brazil. Price the engines low and Ford’s Brazil profits drop but those of U.S. Ford rise.

There are limits to this with physical products. One engine is not worth $1 million nor is it worth $100. But with software or intellectual property or pure service-based businesses, the sky’s the limit. What does one subsidiary charge another for design of an implanted medical device, but not the actual device? Writing advertising and designing logos for hamburger wrappers? Writing code for a search engine or social media? Accounting and legal services?

For years, McDonald’s, using the “double-Irish with a Dutch sandwich” ploy so beneficial to Google, moved franchise-fee income versus corporate overhead to lower taxes. It’s all legal, and corporate transfers between subsidiaries based in myriad locations will remain legal. Countries will retain control over their own tax laws, subject to the new provision that a multinational business will have to pay a 15 percent tax on corporate profits to some country. There inevitably will be hitches, but “progress, not perfection” applies here.

The recent ”Pandora papers” leak revealed how South Dakota changed its laws governing trusts at the dictation of law firms specializing in such work, so as to make it a favorable location for them to be established in that state. As for Liechtenstein or Bermuda, there is nothing illegal about this. But in both cases, such favorable rules can attract illegal money as well as legal. A U.S. state or a sovereign nation may gain economic activity and employment, but society on a global whole loses.

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Jackknifed tractor-trailer closes Interstate 70 eastbound at Eisenhower Tunnel

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Jackknifed tractor-trailer closes Interstate 70 eastbound at Eisenhower Tunnel

A jackknifed tractor-trailer shut down Interstate 70’s eastbound lanes Sunday morning at the Eisenhower Tunnel, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation.

The eastbound interstate was closed between mile markers 206 and 213 around 8 a.m. and is expected to reopen around 10:15 a.m., according to CDOT.

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