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Union demands better protection at youth facility

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Union demands better protection at youth facility

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CLAVERACK, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Following an incident that left three staff members injured at Brookwood Secure Center for Youth in Claverack, the union representing most of the workers is calling for change.

The incident took place on September 15.

New York State Police and the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office were called to the scene. They were able to quickly gain control of the situation, but three staff members suffered minor injuries.

On Monday, CSEA is demanding the New York State Office of Children and Family Services take steps to improve safety at the facility.

They are calling on the state to move the most violent residents over the age of 18 to a more secure facility.

“OCFS must take immediate steps to better protect the workers at Brookwood from the most dangerous people under their care,” said CSEA President Mary E. Sullivan. “We cannot allow these violent attacks on workers to continue, and we need more staff now to protect the workers and residents.”

Sullivan said the move would provide a safer environment for the younger residents and offer the best chance for reform.

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Vikings rookie left tackle Christian Darrisaw makes first NFL start at Carolina

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Vikings rookie tackle Christian Darrisaw relieved to get back on field with groin issues behind him

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As expected, Vikings rookie left tackle Christian Darrisaw started his first NFL game on Sunday.

Darrisaw replaced Rashod Hill against the Carolina Panthers at Bank of American Stadium. The move was expected after Darrisaw, taken with the No. 23 pick in the draft, looked good rotating with HIll in last Sunday’s 19-17 win over Detroit. Hill started and was on the field for 39 plays in that game; Darrisaw played 28.

Inactive for the Vikings on Sunday were nose tackle Michael Pierce (elbow), tight end Ben Ellefson (knee), wide receiver Ihmir Smith-Marsette, quarterback Kellen Mond, defensive end Patrick Jones II and linebacker Chazz Surratt. Surratt is from the Charlotte area.

Rookie guard Wyatt Davis, a third-round draft pick, was active after being inactive for the past two games. It marked the first time that both Darrisaw and Davis have been active for the same game.

Minnesota running back Dalvin Cook returned after missing two of the past three games, including the one against Detroit, with a sprained right ankle.

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Covid testing availability and turnaround times still uneven this far into pandemic

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Covid testing availability and turnaround times still uneven this far into pandemic

In one recent week, a New Yorker got a free covid-19 test in a jiffy, with results the next day, while a Coloradan had to shell out $50 for a test two cities from her hometown after a frantic round of pharmacy-hopping. A Montanan drove an hour each way to get a test, wondering if, this time, it would again take five days to get results.

While covid testing is much easier to come by than it was early in the pandemic, the ability to get a test — and timely results — can vary widely nationwide. A fragmented testing system, complicated logistics, technician burnout and squirrelly spikes in demand are contributing to this bumpy ride.

“We’re still where we were 18 months ago,” said Rebecca Stanfel, the Montana woman who had to wait five days for test results in Helena last month after being exposed to someone with the virus.

Unpredictable waits can be a problem for those trying to plan travel, return to school from a quarantine — or even get lifesaving monoclonal antibody treatment within the optimal window if they do have covid.

The White House said in early October it plans to buy $1 billion worth of rapid antigen tests to help improve access to the hard-to-find over-the-counter kits. But people are also facing problems getting molecular testing, including the gold-standard PCR tests.

Public health labs are no longer hamstrung by supply bottlenecks on individual test components such as swabs or reagents, said Kelly Wroblewski, director of infectious disease programs for the Association of Public Health Laboratories. But they are still bearing a large testing load, which she had expected to shift more to commercial or hospital-based labs by now.

Testing labs of all stripes are also facing worker shortages just like restaurants, said Mara Aspinall, co-founder of Arizona State University’s biomedical diagnostics program, who also writes a weekly newsletter monitoring national testing capacity and serves on the board of a rapid-testing company.

“The staffing shortage is very, very real and holding people back from increasing capacity,” she said.

Something as simple as proximity also still dictates how quickly test-takers get results.

“Northern Maine is a good example,” Aspinall said. “Anything you do with PCR is going to take an extra day because it’s got to be flown or driven a ways.”

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Volunteers in the sky watch over migrant rescues by sea

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Volunteers in the sky watch over migrant rescues by sea

By RENATA BRITO

ABOARD THE SEABIRD (AP) — As dozens of African migrants traversed the Mediterranean Sea on a flimsy white rubber boat, a small aircraft circling 1,000 feet above closely monitored their attempt to reach Europe.

The twin-engine Seabird, owned by the German non-governmental organization Sea-Watch, is tasked with documenting human rights violations committed against migrants at sea and relaying distress cases to nearby ships and authorities who have increasingly ignored their pleas.

On this cloudy October afternoon, an approaching thunderstorm heightened the dangers for the overcrowded boat. Nearly 23,000 people have died or gone missing in the Mediterranean trying to reach Europe since 2014, according to the United Nations’ migration agency.

“Nour 2, Nour 2, this is aircraft Seabird, aircraft Seabird,” the aircraft’s tactical coordinator, Eike Bretschneider, communicated via radio with the only vessel nearby. The captain of the Nour 2, agreed to change course and check up on the flimsy boat. But after seeing the boat had a Libyan flag, the people refused its assistance, the captain reported back on the crackling radio.

“They say they only have 20 liters of fuel left,” the captain, who did not identify himself by name, told the Seabird. “They want to continue on their journey.”

The small boat’s destination was the Italian island of Lampedusa, where tourists sitting in outdoor cafés sipped on Aperol Spritz, oblivious to what was unfolding 60 nautical miles (111 kilometers/68 miles) south of them on the Mediterranean Sea.

Bretschneider, a 30-year-old social worker, made some quick calculations and concluded the migrants must have departed Libya approximately 20 hours ago and still had some 15 hours ahead of them before they reached Lampedusa. That was if their boat did not fall apart or capsize along the way.

Despite the risks, many migrants and refugees say they’d rather die trying to cross to Europe than be returned to Libya where, upon disembarkation, they are placed in detention centers and often subjected to relentless abuse.

Bretschneider sent the rubber boat’s coordinates to the air liaison officer sitting in Berlin, who then relayed the position (inside the Maltese Search and Rescue zone) to both Malta and Italy. Unsurprisingly to them, they received no response.

Running low on fuel, the Seabird had to leave the scene.

“We can only hope the people will reach the shore at some moment or will get rescued by a European coast guard vessel,” Bretschneider told AP as they made their way back.

The activists have grown used to having their distress calls go unanswered.

For years human rights groups and international law experts have denounced that European countries are increasingly ignoring their international obligations to rescue migrants at sea. Instead, they’ve outsourced rescues to the Libyan Coast Guard, which has a track record of reckless interceptions as well as ties to human traffickers and militias.

“I’m sorry, we don’t speak with NGOs,” a man answering the phone of the Maltese Rescue and Coordination Center told a member of Sea-Watch inquiring about a boat in distress this past June. In a separate call to the Rescue and Coordination Center in Rome, another Sea-Watch member was told: “We have no information to report to you.”

Maltese and Italian authorities did not respond to questions sent by AP.

Trying to get in touch with the Libyan rescue and coordination center is an even greater challenge. On the rare occasion that someone does pick up, the person on the other side of the line often doesn’t speak English.

More than 49,000 migrants have reached Italian shores so far this year according to the Italian Ministry of Interior, nearly double the number of people who crossed in the same time period last year.

Although it is illegal for European vessels to take rescued migrants back to Libya themselves, information shared by the EU’s surveillance drones and planes have allowed the Libyan Coast Guard to considerably increase its ability to stop migrants from reaching Europe. So far this year, it has intercepted roughly half of those who have attempted to leave, returning more than 26,000 men, women and children to Libya.

Sea-Watch has relied on millions of euros from individual donations over several years to expand its air monitoring capabilities as well. It now has two small aircraft that, with a birds-eye view, can find boats in distress much faster than ships can.

Taking off from Lampedusa, which is closer to North Africa than Italy, the planes can reach a distress case relatively quickly if its position is known. But when there are no exact coordinates, they must fly a search pattern, sometimes for hours, and scan the sea with the help of binoculars.

Even when flying low, finding a tiny boat in the vast Mediterranean can strain the most experienced eyes. The three- to four-person crew of volunteers reports every little dot on the horizon that could potentially be people in distress.

“Target at 10 o’clock,” the Seabird’s photographer sitting in the back alerted on a recent flight.

The pilot veered left to inspect it.

“Fishing boat, disregard,” Bretschneider, the tactical coordinator, replied.

In rough seas, breaking waves can play tricks and for brief moments resemble wobbly boats in the distance. Frequently, the “targets” turn out to be nothing at all, and the Seabird returns to land hours later without any new information.

But finding boats in distress is only the first challenge. Getting them rescued is just as difficult, if not harder.

With the absence of state rescue vessels and NGO ships getting increasingly blocked from leaving port, Sea-Watch often relies on the good will of merchant vessels navigating the area. But many are also reluctant to get involved after several commercial ships found themselves stuck at sea for days as they waited for Italy’s or Malta’s permission to disembark rescued migrants. Others have taken them back to Libya in violation of maritime and refugee conventions.

This week, a court in Naples convicted the captain of an Italian commercial ship for returning 101 migrants to Libya in 2018.

Without any state authority, the Seabird can only remind captains of their duty to rescue persons in distress. In this way, Bretschneider recently got an Italian supply vessel to save 65 people from a drifting migrant boat, just moments before the Libyan Coast Guard arrived.

On another mission a few days later, the Seabird returned from its flight without knowing what would happen to the people they had seen on the white rubber boat.

Bretschneider checked his phone at dinner that night, hoping for good news. On the other side of the Mediterranean, 17 bodies had washed up in western Libya, apparently from a different boat.

The next day the Seabird took off to look for the white rubber boat again, in vain. On their way back, they got a message from land.

The white rubber boat had reached waters near Lampedusa and was picked up by the Italian Coast Guard. The people had made it.

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Chief judge in Colorado’s Fifth Judicial District charged with felony menacing, removed from position

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Chief judge in Colorado’s Fifth Judicial District charged with felony menacing, removed from position

Fifth Judicial District Chief Judge Mark Thompson (Colorado Judicial Branch)

The chief judge for Colorado’s Fifth Judicial District was charged Saturday with felony menacing, according to court records.

Judge Mark Thompson, 54, who presided over courts in Summit, Clear Creek, Eagle and Lake counties, was removed from his position as chief judge after the charge was filed Saturday, according to the Colorado Judicial Branch.

Thompson was charged with a single count of felony menacing with a real or simulated weapon after an investigation by the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, according to court records, which say the incident happened on July 25.

The case was suppressed from public view and court documents that are expected to detail the accusation against Thompson were not immediately available Sunday.

The judge could not be reached for comment and his attorney did not immediately return a request for comment.

Menacing with a real or simulated weapon is a Class 5 felony, and is typically punished with one to three years in prison, followed by parole, according to the state’s sentencing guidelines.

People commit felony menacing if they purposely make someone fear being seriously injured and if, while doing so, they either use a deadly weapon or something that looks like a weapon, or tells the victim they are armed with a deadly weapon, according to state law.

Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice Brian Boatright on Saturday named Judge Paul Dunkelman to serve as interim chief judge for the Fifth Judicial District while the criminal case against Thompson is pending.

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Vikings’ Christian Darrisaw making first NFL start at Carolina; Wyatt Davis also active

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Vikings rookie tackle Christian Darrisaw relieved to get back on field with groin issues behind him

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As expected, Vikings rookie left tackle Christian Darrisaw was in line Sunday for his NFL start.

Darrisaw was to replace Rashod Hill against the Carolina Panthers. The move was expected after Darrisaw, taken with the No. 23 pick in the draft, looked good rotating with HIll in last Sunday’s 19-17 win over Detroit. Hill started and was on the field for 39 plays in that game; Darrisaw played 28.

Inactive for the Vikings on Sunday were nose tackle Michael Pierce (elbow), tight end Ben Ellefson (knee), wide receiver Ihmir Smith-Marsette, quarterback Kellen Mond, defensive end Patrick Jones II and linebacker Chazz Surratt. Surratt is from the Charlotte area.

Rookie guard Wyatt Davis, a third-round draft pick, was active after being inactive for the past two games. It marked the first time that both Darrisaw and Davis have been active for the same game.

Minnesota running back Dalvin Cook returned after missing two of the past three games, including the one against Detroit, with a sprained right ankle.

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From sewers to golf courses, cities see green with new federal covid relief dollars

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From sewers to golf courses, cities see green with new federal covid relief dollars

Duluth, Minnesota, is hiring a social worker to help people with addiction and mental health problems.

Pueblo, Colorado, started paying homeless residents to clean city streets.

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida — in Palm Beach County, home to 160 golf courses — is building a new golf course.

These are among the thousands of ways cities and counties have started spending the first tranche of covid relief money from the American Rescue Plan Act passed by Congress in March.

That economic rescue package provides $130 billion to cities and counties — with few restrictions on how the money can be spent. For many, it was their first economic relief directly received from the federal government.

States received $195 billion from ARPA. They had gotten other stimulus funding in earlier relief packages, including the CARES Act last year.

The infusion of dollars to cities and counties is intended to aid residents and businesses hurt by the covid-19 pandemic, invest in long-term projects or supplement budgets hit by a drop in tax revenue caused by shutdown restrictions and economic slowdowns.

Half the money was made available in May and the rest will be available next year. The localities have until 2026 to spend it.

The money cannot be used to reduce taxes, add to rainy day funds, pay for legal settlements or buttress pension funds.

Other than that, local governments can spend the money virtually as they will. Many cities, such as Buffalo, New York and Houston, are initially classifying large chunks of the allocation as “revenue replacement,” meaning they will use the funds to make up for shortfalls over what would have been expected if the pandemic had not occurred. This gives them the most flexibility, according to a Brookings Institution report.

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Former president Bill Clinton released from California hospital

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Former president Bill Clinton released from California hospital

ORANGE, Calif. — Bill Clinton was released Sunday from the Southern California hospital where he had been treated for an infection and will head home to New York to continue his recovery, a spokesman said.

The former president left the University of California Irvine Medical Center around 8 a.m. with Hillary Clinton on his arm. Dressed in jeans and a sports coat and wearing a face mask, he made his way out of the hospital slowly and stopped to shake hands with doctors and nurses lined up on the sidewalk.

He gave a thumbs-up when a reporter asked how he was feeling, and he and Hillary Clinton then boarded a black SUV. They departed in a motorcade escorted by the California Highway Patrol and headed to the airport.

Bill Clinton’s “fever and white blood cell count are normalized, and he will return home to New York to finish his course of antibiotics,” Dr. Alpesh N. Amin said in a statement shared on Twitter by a Clinton spokesman.

Clinton, 75, was admitted Tuesday to the hospital southeast of Los Angeles with an infection unrelated to COVID-19. He plans to continue his recovery at his home in Chappaqua, New York, officials said.

Spokesman Angel Ureña had said Saturday that Clinton would remain hospitalized one more night to receive further intravenous antibiotics. But all health indicators were “trending in the right direction,” Ureña said.

“President Clinton has continued to make excellent progress over the past 24 hours,” Ureña said.

Hillary Clinton has been with her husband at the hospital and was accompanied there Saturday by daughter Chelsea.

President Joe Biden said Friday night that he had spoken to Bill Clinton, and the former president “sends his best.”

“He’s doing fine; he really is,” Biden said during remarks at the University of Connecticut.

An aide to the former president said Bill Clinton had a urological infection that spread to his bloodstream, but he is on the mend and never went into septic shock, a potentially life-threatening condition.

The aide, who spoke to reporters at the hospital on the condition his name wasn’t used, said Clinton was in an intensive care section of the hospital but wasn’t receiving ICU care.

In the years since Clinton left the White House in 2001, the former president has faced health scares. In 2004, he underwent quadruple bypass surgery after experiencing prolonged chest pains and shortness of breath. He returned to the hospital for surgery for a partially collapsed lung in 2005, and in 2010 he had a pair of stents implanted in a coronary artery.

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Saturday Night Five: Utah controls the South, WSU rolls while Rolovich waits, Oregon hangs on, Montlake melts down

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Saturday Night Five: Utah controls the South, WSU rolls while Rolovich waits, Oregon hangs on, Montlake melts down

Instant reaction to Pac-12 developments on and off the field …

1. Rising rises

We’ll start with the major result in the South, where Utah dominated Arizona State in the second half to turn a 14-point deficit into a 35-21 victory that changed the dynamic of the division race.

Quarterback Cameron Rising was sensational, the defense was terrific — Devin Lloyd seemed to be in three places at once — and Kyle Whittingham’s staff thoroughly out-coached its ASU counterparts.

The Sun Devils had no response to the onslaught, except to commit penalties: 13 of them, in fact, which brought their two-game total in the state of Utah to 29.

Utah converted 7-of-11 third-down opportunities, as Rising continually placed the ball in tight windows.

(His performance left us wondering how Utah’s season might have unfolded differently had Rising, and not Charlie Brewer, been the starter on Week One.)

Arizona State’s drives in the third and fourth quarters:

— three plays, seven yards– 10 plays, 42 yards– five plays, 16 yards– 12 plays, 17 yards

Utah’s drives in the third and fourth quarters:

— nine plays, 75 yards (touchdown)– six plays, 68 yards (touchdown)– 11 plays, 67 yards (touchdown)– 12 plays, 82 yards (touchdown)

We should note the emotion Utah displayed in the second half; clearly, the Utes were inspired by the memories of former teammates Aaron Lowe and Ty Jordan. Don’t discount the potential for that psychic energy to last through November and power a charge to the division title.

As a result of the victory, Utah has temporary command of the division with a one-game lead in the loss column over UCLA and a two-game lead over ASU (including the head-to-head tiebreaker).

If the Utes beat the Bruins in two weeks, they will have a potentially decisive advantage on their only close pursuers, although their remaining schedule is a bit more difficult than ASU’s.

Meanwhile, the Sun Devils head home, their momentum halted and their future murky with the NCAA investigation lingering.

The division title is within reach, although they need help. But the course of the season feels vastly different now than it did a few hours ago, when they were undefeated in conference play.

2. Rolovich rises

There are plenty of developments on the field for Washington State but, at this point, none off the field.

Let’s first address the former:

The Cougars rallied twice to beat Stanford, erasing deficits in each half to emerge with a 34-31 victory.

It was WSU’s fifth consecutive win in the series — think about that for a moment — and its third consecutive win this season.

At 4-3 overall, the Cougars must win two of their last five to secure a spot in the postseason.

— One of those five is Arizona, perhaps the worst team in the Power Five.

— Another is BYU, which has lost two in a row.

— A third is Washington, which is vastly more vulnerable than at any point since the Apple Cup turned lopsided in 2013.

What’s more, the Cougars are just off the pace in the North race, one game back of the Oregon schools (in the loss column) with head-to-head showdowns upcoming.

Clearly, the players haven’t let Nick Rolovich’s vaccine situation become a distraction. They’re playing hard for him. The Gatorade shower at the end of the game was proof of that.

3. Mandate matters

For all the good cheer on the sideline, the state’s vaccine mandate looms.

Rolovich said after the game that he hadn’t been informed of a judgment on his request for an exemption on religious grounds.

The deadline to comply is Monday. Any state employee who is not vaccinated, or doesn’t receive an exemption, will be terminated.

“I’m gonna come to work tomorrow … I don’t think this is in my hands,” Rolovich said after the game.

(Of course it’s in his hands. If he gets vaccinated, he won’t be fired.)

This could play out in any number of ways in the next 48-72 hours:

— Rolovich could have his exemption request denied in the blind review process, then refuse a last chance to get vaccinated. In that case, WSU will begin the separation process and appoint an interim head coach.

— Rolovich’s request could be approved in the blind review process only to have WSU president Kirk Schulz and athletic director Pat Chun determine that, if unvaccinated, he cannot perform his job effectively and/or keep the public safe.

In other words, Rolovich would not qualify for the exemption under the accommodations language in the mandate. Dismissal would follow.

— The review process could extend beyond Monday, in which case Rolovich would be placed on unpaid leave until the school resolves his case.

We’re skeptical that Rolovich will be coaching the Cougars for next weekend’s game against Brigham Young. He has every right to not get vaccinated, and the university has every right to fire him for not getting vaccinated.

4. Ducks duck and upset

Alone among the Power Five conference, the Pac-12 has just one team — Oregon — with less than two losses.

Because the Ducks also beat Ohio State, they remain a playoff contender.

Sure, they lost at Stanford (3-4) a few weeks ago.

Sure, they struggled to beat back Cal (1-5) on Friday night.

No, they haven’t looked at all like a playoff team since Week Two, unless you’re referring to the FCS playoffs.

But guess what: It doesn’t matter how Oregon looks in October. Forget style points.

All that matters is that the Ducks keep winning, all the way through the first weekend in December. As a 12-1 Pac-12 champion with a victory at Ohio State, they would have a terrific chance to make the CFP.

But because of the loss at Stanford, they need to win out.

Oregon is the conference’s only chance to claim a playoff berth for the first time since 2016.

Everybody else has at least two losses. No two-loss team has ever made the CFP, and I guarantee the first team that makes the cut won’t come from the Pac-12.

5. Meltdown on Montlake

The losses are mounting, the fans are panicking, and time is running short for Washington.

After a 24-17 loss to UCLA in which neither the offense or defense performed well, the Huskies are 2-4 and in serious danger of missing the postseason.

They need four wins in their final six games, which isn’t quite as daunting as it seems given the presence of Arizona and Colorado on the schedule.

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Photos: After months in lockdown, a weary world is ready to dance

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Photos: After months in lockdown, a weary world is ready to dance

Even in the depths of the pandemic — even when the world locked down, leaving billions isolated and desolated — there were those who danced.

“I did not stop dancing for a second,” says Federico Carrizo, who competed in the Tango World Championship in Buenos Aires last month. “In the kitchen, on the street, on the balcony …”

Some danced alone. Some danced alone and yet together, swaying and twirling across the internet. Some danced to be freed of the shackles of the coronavirus, if only for a moment.

“It was very hard to be for a year and a half without being able to go out to the recreation center to dance,” says Joaquin Bruzon. “Sometimes during the quarantine at home we would dance to try to improve our spirits.”

Now, once again, the Failde Orchestra of Matanzas, Cuba, can perform danzóns like “El Naranjero” and “Cuba Libre,” “A La Habana me Voy” and “Nievecita.” And once again, Bruzon and his wife, Milagros Cousett, can glide across the dance floor.

Maybe it’s because of the advent of COVID-19 vaccines. Maybe it is because feet can be repressed for just so long. But it seems that everywhere, dancers are letting loose.

At a family gathering on Topanga Beach in Malibu, California, Pejiman Sabet takes his wife, Gili, in his arms and dances in the sand. “Love is everything right now,” Gili says.

In Taytay, the Philippines, members of the INDAK Banak dance company wear masks to prepare for an upcoming competition. Abegail Mesa is overwhelmed — finally, she can dance with her friends.

In a Beijing, a park is alive with plaza dancing — an activity popular with middle-aged and older women, curtailed at the pandemic’s height. “As long as I can move, I will keep dancing,” says Li Fei, a lead dancer.

In a Soweto studio, Tsimamkele Crankydy Xako practices South African dance gleefully. On a Cairo rooftop, Nadine El Gaharib spins in the air. In Gaza City, Palestinians romp in traditional uniform.

And in Oruro, Bolivia, the Diablada de Oruro dance — a fixture of the Andes for hundreds of years — is back after a one-year hiatus. Its absence was keenly felt. Dancer Andrea Hinojosa recalls how hard it was to sit at home last year and watch tapes of previous carnivals; he was elated to don the spectacular devil’s costume once more.

“Today,” he says, “the joy is back, we are dancing La Diablada again.”

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Bill Clinton released from Southern California hospital

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Bill Clinton released from Southern California hospital

HAVEN DALEY

ORANGE, Calif. (AP) — Bill Clinton was released Sunday from the Southern California hospital where he had been treated for an infection.

The former president was released around 8 a.m. from the University of California Irvine Medical Center.

Clinton, 75, was admitted Tuesday to the hospital southeast of Los Angeles with an infection unrelated to COVID-19, officials said.

Clinton spokesman Angel Ureña had said Saturday that Clinton would remain hospitalized one more night to receive further intravenous antibiotics. But all health indicators were “trending in the right direction,” Ureña said.

“President Clinton has continued to make excellent progress over the past 24 hours,” Ureña said.

Hillary Clinton has been with her husband at the hospital and accompanied him as he left Sunday.

President Joe Biden said Friday night that he had spoken to Bill Clinton, and the former president “sends his best.”

“He’s doing fine; he really is,” Biden said during remarks at the University of Connecticut.

Clinton, 75, was admitted on Tuesday with an infection unrelated to COVID-19, Ureña said.

“He is in great spirits and has been spending time with family, catching up with friends, and watching college football,” said Ureña’s Saturday statement.

An aide to the former president said Clinton had a urological infection that spread to his bloodstream, but he is on the mend and never went into septic shock, a potentially life-threatening condition.

The aide, who spoke to reporters at the hospital on the condition his name wasn’t used, said Clinton was in an intensive care section of the hospital but wasn’t receiving ICU care.

In the years since Clinton left the White House in 2001, the former president has faced health scares. In 2004, he underwent quadruple bypass surgery after experiencing prolonged chest pains and shortness of breath. He returned to the hospital for surgery for a partially collapsed lung in 2005, and in 2010 he had a pair of stents implanted in a coronary artery.

He responded by embracing a largely vegan diet that saw him lose weight and report improved health.

Clinton repeatedly returned to the stump, campaigning for Democratic candidates, most notably Hillary Clinton during her failed 2008 bid for the presidential nomination. And in 2016, as Hillary Clinton sought the White House as the Democratic nominee, her husband — by then a grandfather and nearing 70 — returned to the campaign trail.

___

Associated Press writer Lou Kesten in Washington contributed to this report.

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