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The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5: Rookie QBs playing big minutes

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The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5: Rookie QBs playing big minutes

The moment came late Sunday afternoon when San Francisco quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo injured his calf, sending former North Dakota State Bison legend Trey Lance into the fray.

That meant that all five first-round quarterbacks of the Class of 2021 had moved into the No. 1 role with their teams.

Four of the five are expected to start this week, and Lance could make it an uneven five if Jimmy G is unable to go and the 49ers’ torch is passed for at least one week.

What are the fantasy prospects for the five frosh? Depends on whether you’re talking short-term, or the long haul:

Trey Lance (49ers) — Sure, his first two NFL completions went for touchdowns, but Lance hasn’t exactly lit up the stat sheet. He’s 10 for 19 for 162 yards and 3 TDs, and he ran seven times for 41 yards in his relief appearance against Seattle. The Niners desperately need to win at unbeaten Arizona this week, so they will go with Garoppolo if at all possible. Stay tuned.

San Francisco 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan, right, talks with quarterback Trey Lance (5) during the second half of an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Tony Avelar)

Trevor Lawrence (Jaguars) — The Clemson dude who never lost a regular season game in high school or college is now 0 for ever as a pro. He’s 29th in passer rating and has seven interceptions and five TD passes in his first four games. But at least he wasn’t caught getting a lap dance in a Columbus bar like his coach.

1633531808 290 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Trevor Lawrence (16) scrambles from pressure during an NFL football game against the Cincinnati Bengals, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Zach Bolinger)

Mac Jones (Patriots) — Jones was the last first-rounder back in May, but he has clearly been the No. 1 rookie QB of the fall. While he has only four TD passes, he has completed 70 percent of his passes. And he wasn’t embarrassed in his high-profile matchup in last Sunday night’s Brady Bowl.

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New England Patriots quarterback Mac Jones (10) signals from the line during the first half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Zach Wilson (Jets) — What a difference a week makes. After struggling badly in his previous
two games, the former Brigham Young wiz led the Jets to an upset win over Tennessee, with 297 passing yards and two TDs. In fact, it’s not completely crazy to consider picking Wilson up on waivers this week and starting him vs. Atlanta.

1633531808 414 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
New York Jets quarterback Zach Wilson looks to hand off the ball during the second half of an NFL football game against the Tennessee Titans, Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Justin Fields (Bears) — The former Buckeye also had a Week 4 revival, albeit vs. the lowly Lions. Fields completed only 11 passes but tallied 209 yards. And that was enough to likely secure another start this week in Las Vegas, unless Andy Dalton becomes suddenly healthy. The world awaits coach Matt Nagy’s next move with bated breath.

1633531808 616 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Detroit Lions linebacker Charles Harris, left, strips Chicago Bears quarterback Justin Fields, right, of the ball during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Kamil Krzaczynski)

SITTING STARS
Cincinnati QB Joe Burrow has been hot, but he will cool off without a sufficient running threat vs. Green Bay. … Philadelphia has pretty much given up on Miles Sanders, and you should too against Carolina. … Same goes for the putrid Miami offense and RB Myles Gaskin vs. the mighty Buccaneers. … Pittsburgh’s Najee Harris will be kept in check by the Broncos. … Chargers RB Austin Ekeler, who starred Monday night, will be less prolific vs. Cleveland on Sunday. … San Francisco tight end George Kittle will continue to struggle vs. the unbeaten Cardinals. … And while you should still start all your Chiefs stars, they will have less-than-glorious stats in their matchup against Buffalo’s No. 1 defense.

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Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow (9) escapes pressure in the pocket during an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Zach Bolinger)

MATCHUP GAME
The Kirk Cousins MVP Express, which was derailed last week by Cleveland, gets back on track thanks to Detroit. … Rams QB Matthew Stafford will rebound this week against Seattle’s league-worst defense, and that’s also good for receivers Cooper Kupp and Robert Woods. … New Orleans QB Jameis Winston will also look better vs. Washington … It’s OK to put Giants RB Saquon Barkley back in your starting lineup. He’ll continue his revival vs. Dallas … Jacksonville RB James Robinson will run so well against Tennessee that people will forget, for a second or two, the embarrassment that is Urban Meyer. … New England RB Damien Harris, against lowly Houston, will atone for his -4-yard performance against Tampa Bay. … And the Colts should be able to throw well vs. Baltimore, so you can count on WR Michael Pittman.

1633531808 766 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) scrambles with the ball during an NFL football game against the Cleveland Browns, Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021 in Minneapolis. Cleveland won 14-7. (AP Photo/Stacy Bengs)

INJURY WATCH
Just as Chicago RB David Montgomery was looking like a star, he injures his knee. He’ll be out 4-5 weeks, so former Chief Damien Williams has a great opportunity to shine. …. Cincinnati’s Joe Mixon is said to be week to week with an ankle injury, so fellow Oklahoma alum Samaje Perine moves up to No. 1 there. … Miami WR Will Fuller has a broken finger, but that offense is too broken to use him anyway. … Carolina RB Christian McCaffrey is stiil out, and players sidelined for a while last week include Jaguars WR D.J. Chark and Saints backup RB Tony Jones Jr,, while Tampa Bay TE Rob Gronkowski remains doubtful, … Players listed as questionable include Rams RB Darrell Henderson, Seattle RB Chris Carson. San Fran running back Elijah Mitchell and tight end George Kittle, Tennessee receivers A.J. Brown and Julio Jones, Steelers WR Chase Claypool, Giants wideout Sterling Shepard, Washington TE Logan Thomas and Rams tight end Tyler Higbee,

1633531808 840 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Chicago Bears running back David Montgomery grimaces in pain after being injured during the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

THE DEEPEST SLEEPERS
While high-ranked tight ends have proved disappointing, from George Kittle to Kyle Pitts to Logan Thomas, two appear to be having breakout seasons. Dallas’ Dalton Schultz has effectively emerged as the Cowboys’ No. 3 receiving threat, with 20 catches for 201 yards and three touchdowns. In Buffalo, Dawson Knox has become a TD machine, reaching paydirt on 20 percent of his targets. His four TDs have him tied for second in the league, trailing only Kupp.

1633531808 736 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Dallas Cowboys tight end Dalton Schultz (86) is tackled by Carolina Panthers cornerback Rashaan Melvin (29) after a catch during the first half of an NFL football game in Arlington, Texas, Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Roger Steinman)

THE THURSDAY PICK
Rams at Seahawks (+2½):
Pick: Rams by 4

1633531808 925 The Loop Fantasy Football Report Week 5 Rookie QBs playing
Los Angeles Rams quarterback Matthew Stafford rolls out during the second half in an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in Inglewood, Calif. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

BREAKING NEWS
We’ll be updating our column, based on the latest injuries and innuendo, right up until Sunday’s kickoff. Go to TwinCities.com/theloop.

You can hear Kevin Cusick on Wednesdays on Bob Sansevere’s “BS Show” podcast on iTunes. You can follow Kevin on Twitter — @theloopnow. He can be reached at [email protected]

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Denver artisan bakeries start “Bread Club” to keep business rolling

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Denver artisan bakeries start “Bread Club” to keep business rolling

A phenomenon early in the pandemic was captured on social media: people stuck at home were baking — and proudly displaying — photos of their bread.

“We’ve baked bread for thousands of years. It’s one of the oldest staple foods we have,” baker Zach Martinucci said.

So, there’s bread as sustenance. And Martinucci said that going through the steps of making bread might have helped restore a sense of rhythm to days that grew monotonous for people at home with few diversions.

Martinucci talks about cooking during the pandemic with two hats on: He owns the bakery Rebel Bread and studied culinary anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

His new venture, Bread Club, is intended to help local bakers keep their kitchens humming as consumers and businesses continue to adjust to a shifting marketplace.

Five Denver bakeries are members of the club, a market for local artisan bakery orders. The bakeries are Rebel Bread, Moon Raccoon Baking Co., Sugar Bakeshop,  Pandemic Donuts and  Mile High Pie Co.

Martinucci said the bakeries have a big presence at farmers markets, so their summers are busy. Sugar Bakeshop has a storefront. Rebel Bread has wholesale customers and opens a retail counter on weekend mornings at its kitchen and offices on South Broadway. The other bakeries sell online, to some wholesale customers and at pop-up events.

“I’m hoping Bread Club in the offseason provides a reliable way for people to sample and support these different bakeries that might not have regular hours,” Martinucci said.

Bread Club deliveries go out from Rebel Bread and are available in Denver and some neighboring areas. Customers can also pick up their orders at Rebel Bread.

Martinucci said people like being able to customize their orders and sample pastries, breads and pies from the various bakeries.

“The menu rotates and there’s always something new to try,” Martinucci said.

Sugar Bakeshop has been open for about a decade. Martinucci started Rebel Bread three years ago after working in a French bakery and attending the San Francisco Baking Institute.

The other three Bread Club members are pandemic-era startups.

Tanner Burgard quit his real estate job early in the summer of 2020 to return to his true passion of cooking. He “bounced around,” working for friends in the restaurant industry while trying to learn as much as he could. In February, Burgard started Mile High Pie Co. He settled on pies because of his love of savory dishes, like the chicken pot pie his wife makes. He also wanted to make something that could easily be delivered. “Without a storefront or anything, I knew it had to be deliverable.”

Burgard, who has three regular part-time employees, started with the savory and expanded to the sweet. His latest selection included Southern sausage gravy and bacon pie and walnut, whiskey and maple pie. Burgard’s latest favorite is a beef bourguignon pie. It’s made with red-wine braised beef, mushrooms, carrots, onions, potatoes and red-wine beef gravy.

Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Fresh sourdough, left, and baguettes at Rebel Bread in Denver Nov. 04, 2021.

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New documentary tells the story of ski race held just weeks after Germany’s surrender in World War II

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New documentary tells the story of ski race held just weeks after Germany’s surrender in World War II

Barely a month after Nazi Germany surrendered in 1945, war-weary American soldiers from the renowned 10th Mountain Division “ski troops” — who had trained for World War II at Colorado’s Camp Hale — held a ski race on a spectacular peak in the Julian Alps, near the border of Italy and what was then Yugoslavia.

In Italy’s Apennine Mountains, they survived fierce clashes with German forces that claimed the lives of 992 of their comrades. They had fought heroically on Riva Ridge, Mount Belvedere and through the Po Valley to Lake Garda, where Benito Mussolini had a villa. Terrible images of battle were all too fresh in their minds, but holding a ski race seemed like a good way to celebrate the lives that had been spared. Despite the horrors of mountain combat, they had not lost the love for skiing and mountaineering that drew them to Camp Hale three years earlier.

The story of the 10th — its cold-weather training in the mountains between Vail and Leadville, its fierce battles in Italy and the improbable giant slalom at Mount Mangart on June 3, 1945 — is told in a new historical documentary written, produced and directed by Chris Anthony, a professional skier and member of the Colorado Snowsports Hall of Fame. The 70-minute film — titled “Mission Mt. Mangart, the Mighty Story of the 10th Mountain Division” — premiered on Veterans Day at Boettcher Concert Hall in an event that included a performance by the Colorado Symphony. It will play at several Colorado venues during ski season.

Anthony, who is well known to Colorado skiers for more than two dozen appearances in Warren Miller films as a daredevil big mountain skier, is often overcome with emotion when recalling how the movie came to be made and the reactions it is eliciting. He falters when describing what happened after a screening for 300 troops at Fort Drum, N.Y., the current home of the 10th Mountain Division, when a two-star general summoned Anthony to the stage. Anthony saw the general had difficulty composing himself.

“I walked up there and he told me that on their uniforms on the left arm is the 10th Mountain Division patch, but if you have a 10th Mountain Division patch on your right arm, that means you’ve seen combat,” Anthony said. “He tore the combat patch off his right arm and handed it to me.”

“Mission Mt. Mangart” captures the fun-loving character of the troops training at Camp Hale and the tragedy of war, using lots of archival footage and first-hand accounts from men who lived through it.

Bruce Campbell, who reported to Camp Hale when he was 18, is one of the few veterans of the World War II ski troops who is still alive. Now 98, his baritone is one of the voices in the film’s narration, including this observation on the mood of the 10th when the guns finally fell silent.

“You would have thought that, upon hearing that the war had ended for us that we would be cheering and firing weapons and hollering,” Campbell says. “But there was a far more somber reaction because we were tired and the war was over for us. It was a short period of combat but very intense, and we couldn’t help but think about wounded soldiers and, of course, those killed in action.”

Vili Vogelnik, provided by Chris Anthony

A pair of vintage skis from the 1940s are shown in the foreground with Mount Mangart in the background. Mangart is a peak in Slovenia where 10th Mountain Division troops who trained for winter warfare at Colorado’s Camp Hale held a ski race a month after the World War II ended in 1945. That race, and the heroic exploits of the 10th that preceded it are depicted in a new film by Chris Anthony, “Mission Mt. Mangart,” which will be shown at several Colorado venues during the ski season. Anthony is a former Warren Miller ski film athlete.

And yet, only 32 days after German forces surrendered Italy, the 10th decided to have a ski race. They had been repositioned in the Julian Alps, in what is now Slovenia, to deter Yugoslavian dictator Josip Tito from moving into Italy. Few knew about the race when Anthony learned of it by chance seven years ago. He set out not only to tell that story but to re-create the race for the film.

Anthony learned the idea for the race on Mangart came from Karl Stingl, a 10th Mountain soldier who was struck by the grandeur of the peak while running military messages back and forth over nearby Predil Pass. Stingl was born in a German-speaking area of Czechoslovakia and learned to ski there as a boy. His parents sent him to the U.S. in 1937 to live with a relative because they sensed war was coming. He joined the 10th in 1942, becoming one of the many European-born skiers and mountaineers who joined the elite infantry unit at Camp Hale, including two famed Austrian mountaineers and ski racers, Toni Matt and Friedl Pfeifer.

As Anthony says in the movie, “When the opportunity came to utilize the skills they learned to fight for their new country against the tyranny destroying their homelands, they signed up.”

The Mangart race was won by Walter Prager, a Dartmouth ski coach and native of Switzerland who was a two-time world downhill champion before the war. Finishing second was Steve Knowlton, a longtime Coloradan who famously used to describe himself as “the first ski bum in Aspen.” He competed in the 1948 Olympics, opened a night club in Aspen and was instrumental in founding Colorado Ski Country USA, serving as the organization’s first director.

“He was a freshman at the University of New Hampshire and got the call, or heard about it, and rode his motorcycle west to Camp Hale to join up,” said one of his sons, Reid Knowlton, in a phone interview with The Denver Post.

After the war, former 10th Mountain ski troops helped found ski areas all over the country including Aspen, Vail and Arapahoe Basin. Despite the bloodshed they had seen while fighting in the Alps, the spirit of skiing and the mountains still burned within them.

“It might have saved them,” said Knowlton, who saw Anthony’s film at the Boettcher. “That was their playground, their comfort, everything they knew. I think they were able to hold onto that. They were young guys, having fun. They had to go fight, but they kept their passion alive, and that may have helped diminish or limit the PTSD that others in subsequent wars have had to deal with.”

There is something almost eerie about how Anthony came to make the film. Visiting the home of an Italian friend at the friend’s home in Colorado decades ago, Anthony saw a picture of Mangart and it cast a spell on him. He decided he had to see that mountain in person, and he made numerous trips there in the years that followed. It became like a second home.

“From the first time I laid eyes on Mount Mangart, it felt as if I had some sort of spiritual connection with the mountain,” Anthony said. “It’s as if my life had been designed to take this journey and share this story.”

Janez Kavar, a retired general in the Slovenian mountain troops, heard about Anthony’s frequent visits to the region, and in 2014 he left a manuscript for him at a hotel where Anthony stayed whenever he was there. Kavar previously had been to Colorado on research missions, visiting the Denver Public Library and the Colorado Snowsports Museum in Vail to learn more about the 10th. At the museum, Kavar saw Anthony’s “Climb to Glory.”

Professional skier, writer, director, producer, Chris ...

Andy Cross, The Denver Post

Professional skier Chris Anthony, familiar to Colorado skiers for appearing in Warren Miller ski films and in-theater performances as MC, is the director, writer and producer of “Mission Mt. Mangart,” a historical documentary about the World War II 10th Mountain Division ski troops. The film will be touring Colorado venues this winter.

The manuscript Kavar left for Anthony became the seed for the film, and in 2017, Kavar helped Anthony re-create the race on Mount Mangart. Townspeople turned out to help clear the road of rockfall and avalanche debris.

“All these townspeople, current mountain troops and retired (troops) in their 80s showed up in period gear from the ‘40s and we re-created the race,” Anthony said. “It had been raining for weeks. The day we had the permit (to film), blue skies. The next day it started raining again. There’s no way I was getting away from this story. Now I was married to it, and I had to deliver on it.”

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How data is reshaping real estate

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How data is reshaping real estate

By Patrick Sisson, The New York Times Company

Jordan Fisher was troubled. Every variety of the Red Bull energy drink comes in a similar metallic can, and his company’s camera system, which tracks products that customers pick up in stores, was having trouble distinguishing them.

This obstacle was one of many that his company, Standard AI, faced while retrofitting a Circle K convenience store in Tempe, Arizona, with computer vision software, which tracks every item that customers pick up so they can simply scan their app-enabled phone to pay as they leave, eliminating the checkout line. A network of more than 100 cameras can identify any of the thousands of similarly sized candy bars or beverages grabbed by customers, including cans of Red Bull, now identifiable thanks to a combination of geometric projections and higher-resolution cameras.

This tracking of consumer activity within the store — where shoppers look and linger, with cameras capturing their interactions and their near-misses — is part of a growing effort to use data collection to make commercial real estate more efficient.

“Checkout is kind of the killer app, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg,” said Fisher, CEO of Standard AI, which hones camera accuracy in high-volume, high-density environments. “You have a system that understands where people are in real time, down to the centimeter. It’s all about utilization of real estate.”

From the invasion of big-box stores to the ascendancy of e-commerce and, most recently, pandemic lockdowns, physical retail may seem stuck in perpetual crisis. But in-person shopping is still very popular and the subject of significant investment. (Retail tech investment hit a record $31.5 billion in the second quarter this year.) Amazon has spent generously on physical retail, including $13.4 billion on the acquisition of Whole Foods, and the development of its Just Walk Out system, which kick-started a race for cashierless checkout among grocery stores and retailers.

The added layers of technology in stores and entertainment venues — crowd-tracking cameras, information gleaned from smartphones, tallies of neighborhood foot traffic and sophisticated demographic data — aim to replicate the data measurement and analysis of the online experience.

But privacy advocates are sounding the alarm about the technology as Big Tech is under increased scrutiny. Congressional testimony from the Facebook whistleblower, Frances Haugen, in October has intensified calls for new regulations to rein in Silicon Valley giants.

Outcast via The New York Times

A handout photo shows the crowd analysis software used by Standard AI to track customers in a Circle K store in Tempe, Arizona. Tech start-ups are offering new tools to help retailers and entertainment venues be more efficient by counting crowds, tracking foot traffic and following local shopping habits.

Complicating efforts to address privacy concerns is a lack of regulatory clarity. Without an overarching federal privacy law or even a shared definition of personal data, retailers must sort through layers of state and municipal rules, such as California’s Consumer Privacy Act, said Gary Kibel, a partner at law firm Davis+Gilbert who specializes in retail privacy.

Technology companies counter the pushback by noting that their systems are designed to limit what they collect and anonymize the rest. For instance, Standard AI’s system does not capture faces, so they cannot be analyzed with facial recognition technology.

The growing volume of data on consumer and crowd behavior is having significant implications on real estate design. It is making even physical space more interactive for marketers.

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