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Business people: Sunday, Oct. 10

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High school football: Ninth-ranked Woodbury rolls past Eagan 48-15

ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS

Solve, Minneapolis, announced the promotion of Ryan Murray to president of the independent ad agency, with current president and founder Corey Johnson becoming CEO and CEO and founder John Colasanti moving to chairman.

DESIGN

Max Allers of Max Marketing Communications, St. Paul, announced that he has received a national Graphic Design USA American Web Design Award, for new client website redesign.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Edina-based business accounting firm Abdo, Eick & Meyers announced the following promotions: to senior manager: Erin Enstad, Thomas Kueber, Justin Nilson, Jake Ouradnik, Bonnie Schwieger; to manager: Katie Ganfield, Megan Schwanz, Tyler See; administrative supervisors: Tomi McDonald, Christi Spencer; Marketing & Design Specialist: Elly Ohnstad; to senior associate: Jeff Hines, Landon Holmquist, Jason Krogfus, Nick Lawson, Sara Maslakow,  Erik Wagner and Joe Wallis. … St. Paul-based Securian Financial and its subsidiary, Securian Asset Management, announced that they have signed the United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Investment, committed to including environmental, social and governance factors in their investment decision making and ownership. … Rally Ventures, a Minneapolis-based venture capital firm focused on early-stage business technology, announced that Jessi Howard has joined the firm as chief people officer. … Think Bank, Rochester, Minn., announced that Steve Epp has been named vice president of insurance.

HONORS

Hawkins, a Roseville-based specialty chemical and ingredients company, announced it has been included as one of the 2021 Fortune Best Workplaces for Manufacturing and Production list. … TopLine Federal Credit Union, Maple Grove, announced that it has been named Twin Cities Business 2021 Best of Business Reader’s Choice Poll finalist in three categories: Credit Union, Mortgage Lender and Small Business Lender. … Donaldson Co. Inc., a Bloomington-based global manufacturer of filtration products and services for industry, announced it has been named a Yellow Ribbon Company by the Minnesota Department of Military Affairs’ Beyond the Yellow Ribbon program, for the company’s support of service members, veterans and military families.

LAW

Dorsey & Whitney, Minneapolis, announced that for the fourth year in a row it has achieved Mansfield Rule Certification Plus, indicating that in addition to meeting or exceeding the baseline requirements, the firm has successfully reached at least 30 percent diverse lawyer representation in a notable number of leadership roles.

MANUFACTURING

Evolve Additive Solutions, a Minnetonka-based provider of process-innovating technology and services to manufacturers, announced the appointment of Hugh Evans and Joe Allison of 3D Ventures Group to its board of directors.

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

Makana Therapeutics, a newly acquired subsidiary of Eagan-based Recombinetics, announced it has received a $650,000 KidneyX Artificial Kidney Prize for their work to increase the supply of kidney donor organs through pig-to-human xenotransplants, or the process of transplanting organs or tissues between members of different species into humans. … Predictive Oncology, an Eagan-based developer of artificial intelligence applications to personalized medicine and drug discovery, announced that Raymond F. Vennare was elected to the board of directors; Vennare is a medical industry entrepreneur who was appointed CEO and chairman of Cvergenx Inc. in 2015.

ORGANIZATIONS

WomenVenture, a Minneapolis-based support organization for women small-business entrepreneurs, announced that LeeAnn Rasachak has been named chief executive officer.

SERVICES

PatchMaster, a New Jersey-based franchiser of drywall repair services for residences, announced that Aaron Sandvig has become a franchise owner for Central Minnesota, based in Minnetonka. Sandvig is a U.S. Army veteran and private attorney. Sandvig’s franchise territory runs from Minnetonka to Alexandria, including the Northwest Minneapolis metropolitan area and St. Cloud. … Dakota Supply Group, a distributor of HVAC supplies and services to business, has announced plans to open a new branch at 250 River Ridge Circle North in Burnsville. It’s the company’s 13th Minnesota location.

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Shelley Joseph’s appeal goes before First Circuit Court of Appeals

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Shelley Joseph’s appeal goes before First Circuit Court of Appeals

Suspended Newton Judge Shelley Joseph’s case finally went before the First Circuit appeals panel with justices questioning why she let an illegal immigrant escape from ICE agents in her court.

The panel questioned the intent behind Joseph’s actions, according to the National Law Journal. “Judicial immunity” was front and center at the hearing Monday.

“The way you laid out the case, you would say that there was no possible argument for corruption. But suppose that that is a jury issue, and the government says, ‘Actually we can and we’ll make a case of corruption.’ And so there are issues of fact, and that makes this fall into the usual category that you can never dismiss an indictment if there are issues of fact,” said Judge Sandra Lynch, the Journal reported.

No decision was announced. Joseph is trying to overturn a lower court’s denial of her appeal to have all her charges dismissed.

Joseph, still receiving her $184,000-a-year paycheck while facing a federal obstruction of justice charge, is accused of aiding an illegal immigrant’s escape from an ICE agent in her Newton district courtroom in 2018.

Retired court officer Wesley MacGregor is also facing the charge for allegedly leading the illegal immigrant through the courtroom’s lockup and exit.

The Journal reported the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts has argued that Joseph and MacGregor were corrupt because the purpose of their actions was to “frustrate the ICE agent.” The feds add judicial immunity typically extends only to civil cases, not criminal ones.

In a motion filed last year, Joseph criticized an alleged “extraordinary sweetheart deal” granting immunity to the illegal immigrant’s defense attorney, who Joseph pins as the “architect and ringleader” of the plan to allow his client’s escape through the courthouse lockup.

Joseph’s motion filing also alleged claims of bias by then-U.S. Attorney Andrew Lelling in a Herald op-ed and television interview as well as former President Donald Trump’s public criticism of judges.

Thomas Hoopes, Joseph’s attorney, also cited in the motion 16 interviews of Todd Lyons, ICE Boston acting field director, by Herald columnist Howie Carr dating back to September 2018.

Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins has been nominated by President Biden to take over at the federal court in Boston now that Lelling is gone. A vote on her appointment is now heading to the full Senate. Rollins advanced through a preliminary vote in the U.S. Senate last week.

But Republicans, most centrally Arkansas U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton, are seeking to make an example out of the progressive Rollins, making her the avatar of what Cotton characterized as “pro-criminal Soros prosecutors” hell-bent on “destroying our legal system from the inside.”

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Michelle Wu calls reinstatement of Boston Police officer fired over allegations of racial slurs ‘unacceptable’

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Michelle Wu calls reinstatement of Boston Police officer fired over allegations of racial slurs ‘unacceptable’

Mayor Michelle Wu is calling the reinstatement of a police officer who was accused of calling a group of Roxbury Prep students racial slurs “unacceptable” but said her hands are tied by union contract language that prevents her from intervening.

“It’s unacceptable that this officer was brought back on after the actions that were taken and that the city’s department took as well. An important part of how we are looking to contract negotiations for public safety will involve changes in policy here,” Wu told a Herald reporter, following an unrelated event at City Hall on Monday.

The Herald first reported on Friday that Officer Joseph Lynch is in the process of being reinstated following a decision in September, per a November memo from the city’s legal department obtained by the newspaper.

An arbitrator ruled that the Boston Police Department must reinstate Lynch, saying that the officer was just giving a “truthful accurate report” to school staff at the time of the alleged incident in the summer of 2019, per the memo from legal adviser Anthony Rizzo.

Lynch was fired following a BPD investigation for conduct unbecoming a department employee, unreasonable judgment, and the use of racial epithets, but the arbitrator ruled the department “did not have just cause to terminate.”

Boston Police union contracts expired in June 2020 and remain unfinished business. For the newly sworn-in Wu administration, negotiations represent an opportunity to inject unprecedented levels of police accountability and transparency in a department rife with scandal.

Wu said current contract language prevents her “from stepping in on situations where an arbitrator has made a decision.”

Union officials did not respond to questions.

The last year has exposed a police overtime abuse, covering up of allegations of child rape by former Boston Police Patrolman Association’s former president Patrick Rose and buried reports of domestic abuse by former Police Commissioner Dennis White, who was quickly appointed by former mayor Martin Walsh on his way out the door to serve as President Biden’s labor secretary in Washington.

Lawmakers in Boston and on Beacon Hill have taken steps in the past year to bring greater accountability and consequence to police forces long protected by powerful unions and the contracts they procure.

A state-run Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission will begin certifying police officers next year and decertifying those with serious disciplinary allegations deemed credible. In Boston, a Civilian Review Board charged with reviewing and recommending action on complaints will be up and running “soon,” according to Wu.

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Robbins: New winds change Mass. political landscape

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Robbins: New winds change Mass. political landscape

“The more things change, the more they stay the same,” wrote a French essayist in 1849, and the expression has become part of our common parlance. But it isn’t always true, and recent events have demonstrated that if the saying once applied to the norms of Massachusetts political life, it no longer does.

Ranked 15th among the states in population, the Bay State always punches well beyond its weight on the scale of national impact, which is why its political doings receive outsized attention. This makes sense: what happens in Massachusetts doesn’t always stay in Massachusetts, politically speaking. Four of America’s 46 presidents were born here, and seven others studied here. In the last nine presidential elections, three major party nominees – Michael Dukakis, John Kerry and Mitt Romney – were Massachusetts politicians. In 2020 alone, five candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination – Elizabeth Warren, Deval Patrick,  Michael Bloomberg, Seth Moulton and Bill De Blasio – were either Massachusetts officeholders or were raised here.

Then there are the armies of campaign operatives and public policy types that hail from the state. The result: Massachusetts politics is not only a local blood sport but an ongoing national spectacle. Just as a now defunct financial services company’s advertisements once proclaimed “When E. F. Hutton talks, people listen,” so too do political professionals ascribe tea leaf qualities to what happens here.

Two recent developments have generated national attention. The election of 36-year-old City Councilor Michelle Wu as Boston’s new mayor has excited young Bostonians and communities of color, punctuating their ascendancy. The daughter of Taiwanese immigrants, Wu’s election has made it clear that the days when white men ruled Boston’s roost are over. “The old Boston is gone,” Democratic strategist Mary Ann Marsh told the Washington Post last month, “and there’s a new Boston in terms of political power.”

Census figures tell part of the story. In 1970, 79.8% of Boston’s population was comprised of non-Hispanics whites. Now it is 44.6%. Only 2.6% of Bostonians were Hispanics; now it is 18.7%. Asian Americans numbered only 1.3% of the city’s population 50 years ago. Their proportional representation has increased almost tenfold since then.

Wu’s election has electrified Bostonians. Whip smart and seemingly limitless in her energy, the mother of two small children has been everywhere since winning the mayoralty four weeks ago. She doesn’t appear to have much choice in the matter: every group in every neighborhood in the city has been clamoring for her appearance at every ceremony that Boston’s robust holiday season has to offer, and there are a lot of them. This goes beyond the normal “Wouldn’t it be nice to have the mayor come?”; there is a slightly frenzied “Do you think we can get Michelle?” aspect that has taken hold. Nor is this simply a testament to Wu’s personal vibrancy. Her push for free public transportation, cost containment for renters and environmental protection has resonated widely.

Also marking the end of a political era was Republican Governor Charlie Baker’s announcement that he would not seek reelection. Baker is the latest in a long series of moderate Republicans who have won the governorship in dark blue Massachusetts over the past century, and he may be the last. Since his election in 2014, Baker has been one of the country’s most popular governors, not merely projecting but displaying a steady hand, decency and thoughtfulness. These qualities have not endeared him to his own state party which, like the Republican Party generally, is now dominated by election-deniers. The odds that Baker would have lost his own party’s nomination for a third term were likely a big factor in driving a good man from public service.

In Massachusetts, the Gods of Good Governance have both given and taken away, all in the same month. It’s plain that politics here has actually changed and not stayed the same.

Jeff Robbins is a Boston lawyer and former U.S. delegate to the United Nations Human Rights Commission

 

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