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What to Watch on Streaming This Week: Oct 8 – 14

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What to Watch on Streaming This Week: Oct 8 – 14
Kaitlyn Dever and Michael Keaton in the first episode of Dopesick. Antony Platt/Hulu

Another week, another great slate of content to watch! From series premieres to new movies, returning favorites to cult classics, there’s plenty to pay attention to this week. Whether you want a powerfully emotional new show, some good scares, or to drag up your dragging week, we’ve got more than enough to recommend to you.

What to watch on Netflix:

Maid

If The Queen’s Gambit made anything clear about Netflix, it’s that they can produce an arresting limited series surrounding a complex, tortured female character. Instead of chess and Anya Taylor Joy, though, Maid offers actress Margaret Qualley a chance to struggle and shine as an impoverished single mother who’s escaped an abusive relationship and finds work as a house cleaner. The series has received universally positive reviews so far, making it more than worth the watch. Maid premiered earlier this month and is streaming on Netflix now.

Raw

Cannibalism, veterinary school, and the French – oh my! Raw was the 2016 feature directorial debut of French filmmaker Julia Ducournau, a rising star in international film after her body-horror flick Titane won the prestigious Palme d’Or earlier this year. This coming-of-age tale is tinged with horror, as lifelong vegetarian Justine starts her training as a vet and begins to develop a taste for meat—from all sorts of sources. It’s a movie that wants you to be squirming in your seat, so if you’re in the mood to watch something thoroughly freaky, this is the perfect choice. Raw is available to stream on Netflix now.

What to watch on Hulu:

Dopesick

This new limited series promises to be a dramatic look into the greed, trauma, and tragedy that helped to propel the U.S. into its current opioid crisis. Dopesick starts with the creation of OxyContin by Big Pharma company Purdue, then follows all of the unfortunate threads that result from the drug. From suspicious small-town doctor Michael Keaton to DEA agent Rosario Dawson and addict Kaitlyn Dever to CEO Michael Stuhlbarg, this show promises a wide-ranging look at the devastating effects of one company’s decision to prioritize profits over people. Dopesick premieres October 13.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

If the incoming Halloween holiday makes you shiver in antici… pation, then you’ll be happy to hear that the campy cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show is available on streaming. This wonderfully absurd and gleefully obscene movie has remained a staple in theaters for its devoted troupes of audience participants, and while all should try to support their local theaters by attending an interactive showing or two this spooky season, this movie packs more than enough fun and weirdness to experience from the comfort of your own home. The Rocky Horror Picture Show is available to stream on Hulu now.

What to watch on Amazon Prime:

The Manor

In addition to last week’s Bingo Hell, Amazon is partnering with horror juggernaut Blumhouse (Get Out, The Purge series) to bring another scary movie to streamers this week. The Manor, in an interesting addition to last year’s I Care A Lot, centers around an old woman who has been forcibly moved into an assisted living facility following a stroke. Here, she encounters unexplainable supernatural threats, but her incapacitated status forces her to remain in this den of danger. It’s always interesting when a horror movie makes the active choice to subvert the final girl trope, as The Manor does by casting 73-year-old Barbara Hershey as its protagonist, so it makes sense that this film will pack more than a few twists and turns. The Manor premieres October 8.

What to watch on HBO Max:

It: Chapter 2

With It: Chapter 2 becoming available to stream this week, HBO Max has given you the perfect opportunity to set up a great horror movie marathon. Not only could you make a double feature out of It: Chapter 2 and its predecessor It, but you can add a third film onto the roster with It franchise director Andy Muschietti’s directorial debut, Mama. Two out of three of these movies also star Jessica Chastain, which is never NOT a plus. It: Chapter 2 will be available starting October 10.

We’re Here 

For some lighter fare, HBO’s Emmy-nominated reality show is returning. We’re Here brings back drag queens Shangela, Eureka O’Hara, and Bob the Drag Queen—all three made famous by their stints on RuPaul’s Drag Race—to venture to small, rural towns, recruiting people in need of a means of personal expression and helping them perform in one-night-only drag performances. It’s a show that provides a winning combination of heart and humor, equally emotional and uplifting, and with only six episodes in the first season, it’s the perfect show for a quick binge before its second season comes around. We’re Here – Season 2 premieres October 11.


Keeping Watch is a regular endorsement of TV and movies worth your time.

What to Watch on Streaming This Week: Oct 8 – 14

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Biden sounds alarm at virtual summit about global democracy

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Biden sounds alarm at virtual summit about global democracy

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday opened the first White House Summit for Democracy by sounding an alarm about a global slide for democratic institutions and called for world leaders to “lock arms” and demonstrate democracies can deliver.

Biden called it a critical moment for fellow leaders to redouble efforts on bolstering democracies. In making the case for action, he noted his own battle win passage of voting rights legislation at home and alluded to the United States’ own challenges to its democratic institutions and traditions.

“This is an urgent matter,” Biden said in remarks to open the two-day virtual summit. “The data we’re seeing is largely pointing in the wrong direction.”

The video gathering, something that Biden had called a priority for the first-year of his presidency, comes as he’s repeatedly made a case that the U.S. and like-minded allies need to show the world that democracies are a far better vehicle for societies than autocracies.

The premise is a central tenet of Biden’s foreign policy outlook — one that he vowed would be more outward looking than his predecessor Donald Trump’s “America First approach.

The summit was billed by the White House as an opportunity for leaders and experts from some 110 countries to collaborate on defending against authoritarianism, fighting corruption and promoting respect for human rights. But the gathering already has drawn backlash from the United States’ chief adversaries and other nations that were not invited to participate.

Ahead of the summit, the ambassadors to the U.S. from China and Russia wrote a joint essay in the National Interest policy journal describing the Biden administration as exhibiting a “Cold-War mentality” that will “stoke up ideological confrontation and a rift in the world.” The administration has also faced scrutiny over how it went about deciding which countries to invite.

Biden told the virtual gathering this is a moment when a profound diminishment of freedoms is trending around the globe, calling it “the challenge of our time.”

The U.S. may be at it’s own pivot point.

Local elected officials are resigning at an alarming rate amid confrontations with angry voices at school board meetings, elections offices and town halls. States are passing laws to limit access to the ballot, making it more difficult for Americans to vote. And the Jan. 6 attack at the Capitol has left many in Donald Trump’s Republican party clinging to his false claims of a stolen election, eroding trust in the accuracy of the vote.

Biden has said passage of his ambitious domestic agenda — the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill he signed into law, as well as the roughly $2 trillion “Build Back Better Act” of social and climate change initiatives moving through the Senate — will demonstrate how democracy can improve people’s lives.

Some advocates also want Biden to focus on other ways to shore up democracy at home. One early test will come Thursday as the House moves to approve the Protecting Our Democracy Act, the third in a trio of bills — alongside the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Act — largely backed by Democrats in Congress but stalled by Republicans in the Senate.

“The United States has a thriving democracy, but it’s been hurting in recent years,” said Michael Abramowitz, the president of Freedom House, whose annual report marked a 15th consecutive year of a global democratic slide. “Right now, we’re going through a phase in America where it’s very difficult to get things done and to really prove that democracy can deliver.”

In its new annual report released Wednesday, CIVICUS Monitor, a global rights index, said 13 countries saw their civic freedoms downgraded in 2021 from the previous year. Only one, Mongolia, saw civic freedoms improve, according to the report. Of the 197 countries graded by the group, only 39 were rated as open societies.

A Pew Research Center report released this week said that while “people like democracy, their commitment to it is often not very strong.” Even wealthy countries, including the U.S., have some people who favor military rule, the report said.

Another group, the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, said in its annual report that the number of countries experiencing democratic backsliding “has never been as high” as the past decade, with the U.S. added to the list alongside India and Brazil.

Chinese officials have offered a stream of public criticism about the summit, with one senior government official even calling it a “joke.” They have also expressed outrage over the administration inviting Taiwan to take part in the gathering. China claims the self-governing island as part of its territory and objects to it having any contact on its own with foreign governments.

“The U.S. side claims that its so-called democracy summit is to defend democracy, then I can’t help asking with the most abundant and advanced medical resources and technology, how could the U.S. allow more than 800,000 of its people to die from the virus and leave nearly 50 million people suffering the COVID still?” China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said this week. “With such human rights tragedies, how can the U.S. defend democracy?”

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Controversial St. Louis County mask mandate back in court today

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Controversial St. Louis County mask mandate back in court today

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – The controversial St. Louis County mask mandate will be back in court Thursday morning for more debate.

Lawyers for Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt will square off with attorneys from St. Louis County before Judge Ellen “Nellie” Ribaudo.

Schmitt filed a lawsuit alleging that the second St. Louis County mask mandate announced by County Executive Dr. Sam Page in late September violates state law. A spokesperson for Schmitt said he wants a preliminary injunction to officially stop the mandate.

The last hearing in this case happened not long after the Cole County court ruling by Judge Daniel Green. That decision says COVID-19 health orders issued by local health authorities are unconstitutional and that all existing health orders are null and void. The St. Louis County case was continued until Thursday so attorneys could review Green’s ruling.

Now, attorneys for Schmitt could come with more legal ammunition after Schmitt sent letters Tuesday to school districts and public health agencies across Missouri saying they must rescind and stop enforcing health orders like mask mandates because of Green’s decision. On Wednesday, Schmitt reached out directly to Missouri parents for help in identifying school districts that are continuing to enforce COVID-19 health orders in violation of the Cole County ruling. Schmitt wanted families to reach out to his office with information.

It’s unclear if Judge Ribaudo will make any final rulings Thursday. The hearing is set for 8:30 a.m.

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Nuggets’ Nikola Jokic explains dominance vs. Pelicans: “I just did a lot of spins”

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Nuggets’ Nikola Jokic explains dominance vs. Pelicans: “I just did a lot of spins”

NEW ORLEANS – Nikola Jokic picked the Pelicans apart like it was NBA2K.

Though Jokic copped to playing the wildly popular NBA game, the reigning MVP said he never plays as himself.

“Anybody else,” he said with a grin after dropping 39 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists in Wednesday’s dramatic overtime win over New Orleans.

Jokic served up 11 points in overtime, seizing complete control of the game and overwhelming his counterpart, Jonas Valanciunas, on numerous occasions. Among his tricks, Jokic drained floaters, finished put-backs, buried open jumpers, baited defenders and deked his opponents into the ground.

“He’s just the best big,” said JaMychal Green. “He really is. He’s so skilled. It’s just crazy.”

When pushed to describe that skill, Green hammered the point in virtual terms.

“Man, I feel like 2K gotta add him in 99 everything,” Green said.

Late in the fourth quarter, Jokic pulled off a double spin move to free himself from Valanciunas’ strength and length. The deft bucket gave the Nuggets a temporary 105-103 lead before Valanciunas’ put-back tied it once again.

“What spin move?” Jokic said. “… I just did a lot of spins.”

Never one to reveal his secrets, Jokic had little to say when asked how he processes opposing defenses and decides which vulnerability to attack.

“I don’t want to tell you that,” he said wryly.

At least Green would. The veteran big – whom Jokic adores for his energy and toughness – cited a play late in the fourth quarter where Jokic flattened out their offensive set, ran a pick-and-roll and went to work. Jokic reads opposing defenses like Broncos legend Peyton Manning, only his audibles come during live sets.

“He knows what’s coming,” Green said.

As do opposing defenses, yet they seem to have little or no chance of stopping it. Nuggets coach Michael Malone left no room for interpretation when asked about their fourth-quarter offense.

“When the game is on the line, when we need a basket, the ball is going to go to him,” Malone said. “It’s no longer going to be that equal-opportunity offense.”

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