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Defense seeks to exclude Confederate flag vanity plate at upcoming Arbery trial

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Defense seeks to exclude Confederate flag vanity plate at upcoming Arbery trial

Shaddi Abusaid

Less than two weeks until the start of one of the highest-profile murder trials in Georgia history, defense attorneys are trying to exclude what could become a crucial piece of evidence.

The lawyers, representing two men accused of chasing and fatally shooting Ahmaud Arbery early last year in a Glynn County neighborhood, are asking a judge to prohibit photos of a vanity license plate of the old Georgia state flag on the front of Travis McMichael’s pickup truck. Georgia’s prior flag, flown from 1956 through 2001, prominently featured the Confederate battle emblem.

McMichael, his father Greg, who also joined in the motion, and their neighbor, William “Roddie” Bryan, all of whom are white, will stand trial for murder and other charges in the February 2020 death of Arbery, who was Black. Jury selection begins Oct. 18.

The defense’s motion to exclude the license plate, filed last week, calls the evidence “not relevant” and “prejudicial.”

Travis McMichael’s lawyers argue that prosecutors have two goals in submitting the license plate as evidence: “To draw the conclusion that Arbery saw the vanity plate, that he interpreted its meaning and that he feared the occupants in the truck,” prompting him to run; and to infer that McMichael placed the vanity plate on the front of his new truck “in order to telegraph some reprehensible motive, bias or prejudice.”

In their response to the motion, prosecutors argued that McMichael purchased the truck several weeks before the shooting and attached the vanity plate “for all the world to see.”

“The jury may interpret that evidence in any way they deem appropriate and the State may make reasonable inferences, in closing argument, drawn from the evidence,” prosecutors wrote in a subsequent filing urging the judge to allow it.

Arbery, an unarmed 25-year-old, was shot and killed in the Satilla Shores neighborhood just outside coastal Brunswick on Feb. 23, 2020. Travis McMichael, who killed Arbery; his father, Greg McMichael, a former investigator in the local district attorney’s office; and Bryan, their neighbor, were arrested more than two months later after the GBI announced it would look into the case.

Greg McMichael and his son, who were both armed, chased Arbery in Travis McMichael’s pickup truck through Satilla Shores. Bryan soon joined in the chase in his pickup and took the infamous cellphone video that showed Arbery being hemmed in and then charging at Travis McMichael, who killed Arbery with three shotgun blasts.

The McMichaels and Bryan contend they were making a valid citizen’s arrest because they believed Arbery had burglarized a home under construction and was fleeing. Prosecutors say no citizen’s arrest was justified, and they note Arbery, who was running through the neighborhood, had no stolen items in his possession when he was killed.

It is now up to Superior Court Judge Timothy Walmsley to decide whether the photos of the license plate can be shown to the jury. He recently ruled that neither Arbery’s criminal record nor his mental health history can be be brought up by the defense at trial.

When he was in high school, Arbery was sentenced to five years probation as a first offender on charges of carrying a weapon on campus and several counts of obstructing a law enforcement officer. He was convicted of probation violation in 2018 after he was charged with trying to shoplift a television from a Walmart, court documents show.

Arbery was on probation when he was killed, but prosecutors on Monday filed a motion to exclude the defense from bringing that up at trial, saying “his status as a probationer is not relevant, as the defendants did not know Mr. Arbery was on probation.”

Last week, Walmsley ruled a nurse’s “highly questionable diagnosis” that Arbery suffered from mental illness could unfairly prejudice the jury. The rulings are a blow to the defense, and could hinder their efforts to portray Arbery as the aggressor.

The deadly shooting prompted the Georgia Legislature to overhaul the state’s Civil War-era citizen’s arrest law. It was the second piece of criminal justice legislation to become Georgia law in the wake of Arbery’s death. Lawmakers also passed hate-crimes legislation in 2020, increasing penalties for those convicted of committing crimes against people based on characteristics such as their race, sexual orientation or religion.

Marietta defense attorney Ashleigh Merchant, who has been closely following the case, said she agrees with Walmsley’s decision to exclude Arbery’s mental health history, saying defense attorneys for Bryan and the McMichaels would have had to show their clients were aware of his previous diagnosis.

“If they didn’t know about that at the time, I don’t see how it’s relevant,” she said Wednesday.

By trying to exclude evidence of Travis McMichael’s vanity plate, the McMichaels’ defense team is trying to make it tougher for prosecutors to establish racial bias, Merchant said, adding they need to “humanize their clients” in an attempt to get the jurors to look past any history of racism that will undoubtedly be brought up by the state at trial.

“We all know that the trial is going to be an issue of whether or not these folks were racist,” she said.

Separately, the U.S. Justice Department has obtained a hate-crimes indictment against the McMichaels and Bryan, alleging they chased and tracked down Arbery because he was Black. That case is set to go to trial in February.

According to pretrial testimony, Bryan told GBI agents after the shooting that he heard Travis McMichael say “(expletive) N-word” as he stood over the dying Arbery. McMichael has denied saying that.

Staff writers Bill Rankin and Asia Simone Burns contributed to this article.

©2021 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Visit at ajc.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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After nearly two months, still no sign of missing Hillsdale man

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After nearly two months, still no sign of missing Hillsdale man

HILLSDALE, Mo. – The last time Shemika McGee saw her son, Jarius McGee, was in early September in Hillsdale.

After nearly two months, Jarius is still missing, and Shemika hasn’t heard anything from him.

“I think that he got a phone call, and with the phone call, it just led to something else which led to him missing and I just want him back at home,” she said.

McGee said her son would come and go like many young adults and wasn’t in any trouble that she knew of.

When he left, she said he didn’t have the usual things he would carry like his wallet or headphones.

“We really don’t have anything to go off other than the fact that he’s missing,” McGee said.

Hillsdale Chief of Police John Bernsen said an investigation is ongoing and the department is waiting on Jarius’ phone records.

“Every time we try to chase down a lead it’s always a dead end so that’s why we’re trying to put out the word out so much. We know somebody has seen him. Somebody knows something,” Chief Bernsen said.

Looking for an Angel President Theda Person heard about Jarius missing through social media. Now her non-profit organization has joined the search.

“I’ve created a flyer I’ve contacted Missouri State Highway Patrol to make sure that a flyer was created because law enforcement didn’t really do that,” Person said.

Person believes more can be done in the search is prepared to help McGee as needed.

“1f we say that we care about those that we are serving then we should be more intentional,” she said.

She said with McGee missing this long, he could be anywhere. When asked if he were another race would there be a more thorough investigation, Person thinks so.

“Definitely we can see with the Gabby Petito case and other cases,” Person said.

McGee just wants to know where her son is.

“I mean anything that you can think of goes through my mind,” she said. “Where’s he at, who could he be with? There’s a lot of things going through my mind.”

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‘They’re basically stealing from kids’ – Thieves steal Boy Scout troop’s trailer

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‘They’re basically stealing from kids’ – Thieves steal Boy Scout troop’s trailer

ST. LOUIS – A local Boy Scout troop is heartbroken after a trailer carrying all their camping equipment was stolen over the weekend in the Holly Hills neighborhood. Now, the troop is asking for the public’s help to either find the trailer or help replace the items lost.

Troop 104’s bright red trailer was stolen Friday morning around 5 a.m. Scoutmaster Michael Lohff said the truck and all the equipment inside totaled more than $15,000, including tents, cookware, and tarps. He said all the items were acquired from years of donations and fundraising. 

“It has a big impact on the fact that we’re going to have to look up replacing everything as we go along, or definitely before we hit the road again, and we want to be able to do that very soon,” Lohff said.  

He said he brought a bright red trailer when he first started with the troop so he could carry all the troop’s equipment for camping and other activities.  

“They’re basically stealing from kids; that’s what they’re doing,” he said. “Whoever did take the trailer and all that equipment from the boys. They stole from the boys that are members of the troop and have been members of the troop for all these years.”

Lohff said all the items were acquired through donations and fundraising by his scout members.

The trailer was parked in a private lot in the Holly Hills neighborhood in south St. Louis. Lohff said he has parked the trailer there for nearly two decades without any incident. He was heartbroken to find the trailer had been stolen.

“That raises very personal concerns of who’s right behind my backyard,” neighbor Chuck Smith said.

Smith lives a couple of doors down from the lot. He said the trailer has become a neighborhood staple over the years.

“To do it at this time of year before Christmas, it just seems like a very insensitive thing to do,” he said.  

Lohff said the trailer also got broken into last year, but only a few items were stolen after that incident. But after this recent theft, he’s going to upgrade his security. He said police do not have any security footage. 

Anyone with information on the person or persons responsible for the theft is asked to call the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department at 314-444-0100 or CrimeStoppers at 866-371-TIPS.

There is a GoFundMe page to help the troop replace the stolen trailer and gear.

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Saint Louis Zoo wants gun activist who fought its ban to pay legal bills

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Saint Louis Zoo wants gun activist who fought its ban to pay legal bills

ST. LOUIS (AP) — After successfully defending its weapons ban in court, the Saint Louis Zoo is now trying to force the gun-rights activist who challenged the ban to pay part of its $150,000 in legal bills.

The zoo filed a request for its request for legal fees in August, but a judge has yet to rule on the motion.

A lawyer for Jeffry Smith of Cincinnati, Ohio, who challenged the ban on guns called the motion unfair.

A St. Louis judge ruled last year that the zoo could ban guns on its property because it qualifies as a school and a gated amusement park under state law.

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