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Gabby Petito autopsy update expected today

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Gabby Petito autopsy update expected today

(NewsNation Now) — A Wyoming coroner is expected to update the public on Gabby Petito’s autopsy Tuesday afternoon.

Teton County Coroner Dr. Brent Blue has not disclosed the 22-year-old vlogger’s cause of death, but did rule it was a homicide.

Petito vanished while on a cross-country road trip with her boyfriend Brian Laundrie in a converted camper van. The trip was well-documented on social media until it abruptly ceased, allegedly somewhere in Wyoming. The couple documented most of their trip, which started in July, on a YouTube Vlog called “VAN LIFE”.

Petito, 22, was reported missing Sept. 11 by her parents after she did not respond to calls and texts for several days. Petito’s body was found Sept. 19 just outside Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

Blue said he will discuss the autopsy at 2:30 p.m. ET. NewsNation will live stream the press conference in the player above.

It has been weeks since any firm new details emerged in the case as authorities search for Petito’s boyfriend. Brian Laundrie’s parents say they last saw him Sept. 13 when they said he took the car to a 24,000-acre Florida reserve. He was reported missing Sept. 17.

Despite searching for nearly a month in the Carlton Reserve, police have not found him or even said they’ve found clues.

“We need to find something,” North Port police Officer Josh Taylor told NewsNationNow.com Friday. “I think there’s so much attention on this. I don’t know that this case would ever get to be a cold case. We’ll continue to search. You know, we could be searching that Carlton Reserve and nearby lands for a long, long time.”

The FBI has issued an arrest warrant for Laundrie. He is wanted for “use of unauthorized access device” related to his activities following Petito’s death. The FBI says he used a debit card and a PIN to access two bank accounts Aug. 30 and Sept. 1.

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Editorial: US attorney nomination was the easy part for Rachael Rollins

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Editorial: US attorney nomination was the easy part for Rachael Rollins

Andrew Lelling is a tough act to follow.

The former U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, who stepped down on Feb. 8 along with other former President Donald Trump-era attorneys, had an impressive prosecutorial record of RBIs.

As the Herald reported, Lelling convicted top names at opioid companies, charged dozens of state troopers with overtime-abuse offenses, prosecuted the Latin Kings local organization and snared what’s become known as the “college admissions scandal” — aka Varsity Blues.

Lelling was the face of public safety. Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins is the face of criminal justice reform.

And that difference threw spike strips in the path of her bid to replace Lelling.

Rollins made headlines as she assumed the D.A.’s position in 2019 with her list of 15 “do not prosecute” crimes — such as shoplifting, resisting arrest, drug possession and trespassing.

These were among the reasons U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Arkansas, railed against Rollins’ nomination for U.S. attorney for Massachusetts, referring to the D.A. as a prosecutor hell-bent on “destroying our legal system from the inside.”

The vote to confirm her nomination Wednesday was a squeaker — 50-51, with Vice President Kamala Harris casting the tie-breaking vote.

It would be wrong, however, to ignore Rollins’  less-public moments of prosecutorial rigor.

In October 2020, following the arraignment of a 26-year-old Roxbury man charged with a murder committed while he was out on bail on armed robbery charges, Rollins vowed to deny bail to defendants charged with firearms crimes.

“What we want people to know is there has been a significant uptick in dangerousness hearings that we have been pursuing regarding gun violence, meaning you will not be let out up until your trial,” Rollins said.

She also announced that her department was stepping up its use of dangerousness hearings — also called 58A hearings, which allow for a defendant to be held prior to conviction if a judge determines them to be too dangerous to release back into the community.

On Tuesday, Rollins pushed the Legislature to create a new criminal charge for adults who exploit positions of authority to engage in sexual acts with minors.

As the State House News Service reported, teachers, coaches, babysitters, mentors and other adults who misuse their standing to participate in sexual activity with a child under their watch would face substantial prison time if lawmakers advance a bill (H 1801 / S 1092) that Rollins endorsed.

Under current law, Rollins said, anyone in Massachusetts above the age of consent of 16 years old can legally engage in consensual sexual touching with minors who are at least 14 years old and can have intercourse with minors 16 years old and above.

“This becomes problematic when the person over 16 is an adult and in a position of authority or trust,” Rollins told the Judiciary Committee.

Rollins’ testimony came one day after her office announced that a former Boston Public Schools middle school teacher pleaded guilty to child sex abuse charges involving a former student.

As Massachusetts U.S. attorney, Rollins will be under the microscope by both progressives who’ll want her work on criminal justice reform to continue, and those who want their communities safe from crime.

We’ve seen both sides at work, and look forward to more from the prosecutor who stepped up dangerousness hearings and pushed for harsher charges for adults who abuse minors in their trust.

Congratulations Massachusetts U.S. Attorney Rachael Rollins.

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Dear Abby: Divorced dad still carries torch 10 years later

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Dear Abby: Can’t budge lonely, needy friend from the phone

Dear Abby

By Abigail Van Buren

Dear Abby: I am a 45-year-old divorced father of three. Two of them I share with my ex-wife. We were married for 14 years and have been divorced for 10 years now. Our marriage started falling apart when I became addicted to prescription pain medication. I was using for a couple of years, but I’m sober now.

Our divorce was amicable, and I think we still maintain a great friendship. We call each other occasionally and talk about things other than the kids. After our divorce we both dated and moved in with other people. I am currently single; she’s still in a relationship. She recently called and asked me for advice because she’s not happy in her current relationship.

I have never stopped loving her, but I don’t want to take advantage of her present situation. My kids know how I feel and so do my friends, so she probably does, too. Would it be wrong of me to try to rekindle what we once had, even if there’s the slightest chance of she and her current partner working through their issues? I’m not sure she feels the same way about me as I do her. — Torn in Wisconsin

Dear Torn: When your ex-wife called to tell you things aren’t going well between her and her current partner, she opened the door to you doing what you are contemplating. If they are not married, you have every right to tell her you have never stopped loving her and ask if she might have similar feelings. If she doesn’t, it would be better for you to know that. But if her answer is yes, it would be worth a try.

Dear Abbby: My husband and I always planned on retiring to Florida. Our son, who is married with children, has been diagnosed with a slow-progressing but deadly disease. My husband still wants to move, but now I am not sure. Our son said we should live our life because we worked hard to retire and should go. I don’t know if I could be happy that far away from him and his family now. Please advise. — Hesitant Grandma in Ohio

Dear Hesitant Grandma: I am sorry for the pain you are experiencing regarding your son’s diagnosis. Your husband wants to make the move, and your son has told you he does not want you to change your plans. If it’s financially feasible, it might make sense for you and your husband to rent a place in Florida for a year and, depending upon how well your son is doing, decide later if you want to make it permanent. Perhaps your husband could go ahead without you if you choose to stay behind.

Dear Abby: I have just moved into a room in a shared house. I like the location and my three roommates. In the course of my interview, the screening process to see if I’d be a good fit for the house, I neglected to mention that I have a girlfriend. Naturally, I’d like to have her see the place, meet my roommates and sleep over, but I also don’t want to ruffle any feathers or be premature in having company over. When would be an appropriate time to have this discussion with them? — Pondering in the Presidio

Dear Pondering: If you want a good relationship with your roommates, NOW would be a good time to raise the subject. If you do, you may be pleasantly surprised to find they have no objection. If they did, they should have mentioned something during your interview.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com

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Red Sox add two pitchers, including one from Yankees, in minor league Rule 5 draft

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Red Sox add two pitchers, including one from Yankees, in minor league Rule 5 draft

The lockout didn’t stop the Red Sox from adding to their organizational pitching depth.

After signing three starters to their major league roster just before the expiration of the collective bargaining agreement, the Red Sox used Wednesday’s minor league Rule 5 draft to find some more arms. With two selections, the Sox drafted left-handed pitcher Austin Lambright and right-hander Brian Keller.

There are normally two phases of the Rule 5 draft — major league and then minor league one — that take place at the end of the Winter Meetings, which would have been this week. But the ongoing lockout suspended the major league portion indefinitely.

The 27-year-old Lambright, a 10th round pick in the 2018 draft, was taken from the Royals, but hasn’t pitched since 2019, when he registered a 2.85 ERA in 47 1/3 innings between Low-A and High-A. COVID-19 cancelled the minor league season in 2020 and an injury kept Lambright out in 2021.

The Red Sox nabbed the 27-year-old Keller from the Yankees organization, where he pitched for Triple-A Scranton in 2021, posting a 2.77 ERA in 55 1/3 innings.

No Red Sox minor leaguers were poached by other teams in Wednesday’s Rule 5 draft.

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