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Asteroid outpost seen as first step to being ‘a better space-faring species’

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Asteroid outpost seen as first step to being ‘a better space-faring species’

A robotic space station shaped like a butterfly with a camper van-sized body, parked on an asteroid, will be humankind’s latest outpost for interplanetary exploration.

University of Colorado engineers are teaming with the United Arab Emirates — again — to build the space station and launch it in 2028 when Venus and the Earth align. The mission requires sling-shotting the station around Venus to gain momentum and reach the asteroid 350 million miles away.

The goal is to understand materials that make up the solar system by probing 4.5 billion-year-old asteroid rock, and then determine where water could be found to allow future travel between planets, CU engineer and program manager Pete Withnell said.

“Water is life-enabling for humans. It also can be turned into fuel.  If we have access to water, whether on the moon, Mars, or the asteroids, it will enable human exploration beyond Earth,” Withnell said.

“Any scientific understanding we can have of our environment, which includes the solar system, enables us to be a better space-faring species – which could enable us to leave some day,” he said. “If Earth is going to become an increasingly hostile place, that may become necessary in order to continue.”

What the cube on the asteroids will measure isn’t fully set. It’ll be loaded with solar panels, antennas and sensors, which researchers say will use infra-red technology to analyze rock and thermal instruments to measure temperatures.

Previously, a UAE team of 200 along with 150 U.S. researchers, based at CU-Boulder labs, built and designed UAE’s $200 million Amal (Hope) Mars spacecraft, which was launched from Japan in July 2020. It reached Mars in February and has been transmitting weather, dust storm and other data from different levels of the Martian atmosphere.

Emirates leaders have declared they’ll also send an unmanned spacecraft to the moon in 2024 and establish a human colony on Mars by 2117. Meantime, they’re focusing on building up a space-related economy.

UAE hopes the project with CU will help their push to create a vibrant private sector around space science, Sarah Al-Amiri, chair of the UAE Space Agency, said.

“We see space as a tremendous commercial opportunity for energetic young dreamers, thinkers and doers around the world to converge here in the Emirates,” Al-Amiri said.

The CU-UAE partnership began eight years ago after UAE leaders conducted a search of universities seeking a partner for a knowledge transfer program and settled on CU and its LASP, which was founded in 1948, a decade before NASA, and has sent instruments to eight planets including Pluto.

The United Arab Emirates (pop. 9.8 million) is a South Carolina-sized desert nation along the Persian Gulf, home to Abu Dhabi and Dubai, that has amassed wealth from global finance and exporting oil.

“They’re a country that primarily relies on the export of minerals, but this is not a sustainable future for them, so they’re looking to become a knowledge-based economy,” Withnell said.

Scientists estimate 1.1 million asteroids, remnants from the formation of the solar system, circulate in the frigid area between Mars and Jupiter. They’re spaced millions of miles apart and are considered building blocks of the planets.

Putting a station on an asteroid, or hovering above with instruments anchored to the surface, would accelerate asteroids work pioneered by the European Union, Japan and United States on mostly fly-by missions. Space systems engineers say they’re only beginning to understand what resources, such as water, might be available to support deeper exploration and, ultimately, human life beyond Earth.

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Denver weather: Freezing temperatures and first snow forecast across the metro area Thursday

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Denver weather: Freezing temperatures and first snow forecast across the metro area Thursday

More than a foot of snow has fallen in Colorado following a severe storm that saw high winds and the first freezing temperatures for much of the region.  Weather alerts have been issued across the state and people warned to remain vigilant to the quickly-changing conditions.

The storm will move south through the northern plains throughout Wednesday evening, making way for a brief period of clear weather ahead of a more disruptive front on Thursday.

Thursday will see temperatures plummet as a second storm makes its way across the state from the Pacific Northwest. This front will bring with it a fresh covering of snow and below average temperatures for this time of year. Forecasters warn that the urban corridor could be affected by light snow showers on Thursday night.

Temperatures

Although temperatures fell below freezing in some areas of the plains on Wednesday morning, much of the metro area hovered above that. However, Thursday could mark the start of the cold season for many, with areas including Palmer Divide and other Foothills locations likely to drop below freezing.

Thursday is likely to be Denver’s coldest day since May 11, when temperatures failed to rise above 43 degrees. For most in the Denver area, temperatures will not surpass 50 degrees, with the NWS in Boulder unlikely to see anything above 49 degrees. The Foothills and Palmer Divide will be even colder, with highs in the 30s and low 40s.

It will be a similar story on Friday morning, with temperatures likely to drop as low as 25 degrees in the Denver area. If temperatures do not get above 28 degrees in the city then Friday will be the coldest day since April 15. Temperatures in the Foothills and Palmer Ridge regions are likely to drop into the teens and lower 20s.

Temperatures will struggle to rebound Friday, but by the afternoon forecasters say things should have warmed up a little more than they did on Thursday.

Saturday morning’s low temperature in Denver will remain around 25 degrees, with the afternoon bringing sunshine and highs of more than 60 degrees. This will bring us more in line with seasonal averages. It will be slightly colder in foothill and mountain areas, with highs in the 50s expected.

Front Range snow chance

Along with cold temperatures, the system is likely to bring excess moisture, which will begin to fall as snow in the mountains from Thursday morning. Cloud cover will build over Denver, setting the scene for light, icy rain from 1 pm.

In the foothills, including Nederland, Estes Park and Conifer, this will likely start as snow but quickly switch to rain. A similar story will unfold along the Palmer Divide, affecting areas including Castle Rock and Monument. As temperatures cool in Denver, the light rain is likely to transition into snow by early evening. This should clear by midnight.

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Winter heating bills set to jump as inflation hits home

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Winter heating bills set to jump as inflation hits home

NEW YORK — Get ready to pay sharply higher bills for heating this winter, along with seemingly everything else.

With prices surging worldwide for heating oil, natural gas and other fuels, the U.S. government said Wednesday it expects households to see their heating bills jump as much as 54% compared to last winter.

Nearly half the homes in the U.S. use natural gas for heat, and they could pay an average $746 this winter, 30% more than a year ago. Those in the Midwest could get particularly pinched, with bills up an estimated 49%, and this could be the most expensive winter for natural-gas heated homes since 2008-09.

The second-most used heating source for homes is electricity, making up 41% of the country, and those households could see a more modest 6% increase to $1,268. Homes using heating oil, which make up 4% of the country, could see a 43% increase — more than $500 — to $1,734. The sharpest increases are likely for homes that use propane, which account for 5% of U.S. households.

This winter is forecast to be slightly colder across the country than last year. That means people will likely be burning more fuel to keep warm, on top of paying more for each bit of it. If the winter ends up being even colder than forecast, heating bills could be higher than estimated, and vice-versa.

The forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration is the latest reminder of the higher inflation ripping across the global economy. Earlier Wednesday, the government released a separate report showing that prices were 5.4% higher for U.S. consumers in September than a year ago. That matches the hottest inflation rate since 2008, as a reawakening economy and snarled supply chains push up prices for everything from cars to groceries.

The higher prices hit everyone, with pay raises for most workers so far failing to keep up with inflation. But they hurt low-income households in particular.

“After the beating that people have taken in the pandemic, it’s like: What’s next?” said Carol Hardison, chief executive officer at Crisis Assistance Ministry, which helps people in Charlotte, North Carolina, who are facing financial hardship.

She said households coming in for assistance recently have had unpaid bills that are roughly twice as big as they were before the pandemic. They’re contending with more expensive housing, higher medical bills and sometimes a reduction in their hours worked.

“It’s what we know about this pandemic: It’s hit the same people that were already struggling with wages not keeping up with the cost of living,” she said.

To make ends meet, families are cutting deeply. Nearly 22% of Americans had to reduce or forego expenses for basic necessities, such as medicine or food, to pay an energy bill in at least one of the last 12 months, according to a September survey by the U.S. Census Bureau.

“This is going to create significant hardship for people in the bottom third of the country,” said Mark Wolfe, executive director of the National Energy Assistance Directors’ Association. “You can tell them to cut back and try to turn down the heat at night, but many low-income families already do that. Energy was already unaffordable to them.”

Many of those families are just now getting through a hot summer where they faced high air-conditioning bills.

Congress apportions some money to energy assistance programs for low-income households, but directors of those programs are now watching their purchasing power shrink as fuel costs keep climbing, Wolfe said.

The biggest reason for this winter’s higher heating bills is the recent surge in prices for energy commodities after they dropped to multi-year lows in 2020. Demand has simply grown faster than production as the economy roars back to life following shutdowns caused by the coronavirus.

Natural gas in the United States, for example, has climbed to its highest price since 2014 and is up roughly 90% over the last year. The wholesale price of heating oil, meanwhile, has more than doubled in the last 12 months.

Another reason for the rise is how global the market for fuels has become. In Europe, strong demand and limited supplies have sent natural gas prices up more than 350% this year. That’s pushing some of the natural gas produced in the United States to head for ships bound for other countries, adding upward pressure on domestic prices as well.

The amount of natural gas in storage inventories is relatively low, according to Barclays analyst Amarpreet Singh. That means there’s less of a cushion heading into winter heating season.

Heating oil prices, meanwhile, are tied closely to the price of crude oil, which has climbed more than 60% this year. Homes affected by those increases are primarily in the Northeast, where the percentage of homes using heating oil has dropped to 18% from 27% over the past decade.

___

AP Writer David Sharp contributed from Portland, Maine.

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Some St. Louis Cardinal minor league affiliates teaming up with Marvel Entertainment

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Some St. Louis Cardinal minor league affiliates teaming up with Marvel Entertainment

https://www.facebook.com/search/top?q=minor%20league%20baseball

Fans in nearly 100 minor league markets around the country may want to bring their Infinity Gauntlet along with their baseball gloves to games starting next year, thanks to a partnership announced Wednesday between Minor League Baseball and Marvel Entertainment.

“In each of the three years of the partnership, all 96 participating MiLB teams will host at least one Marvel Super Hero™ themed game as part of the “Marvel’s Defenders of the Diamond” campaign, where teams will wear special edition Marvel Super Hero-branded jerseys on field during the game with other Marvel-themed activities and promotions taking place throughout the game,” the parties announced in a news release.

“Origin stories are just as common throughout minor league baseball as they are within the pages of Marvel’s legendary comic books. We all know the story of how Tony Stark became Iron Man, just as baseball fans know that before Mookie Betts, Fernando Tatis, Jr. and Mike Trout were Major League All-Stars, they were Major League prospects preparing for their hero moments in baseball-loving minor league communities,” Kurt Hunzeker, Major League Baseball’s Vice President of Minor League Business Operations said at an unveiling of the partnership in Chicago. Hunzeker is the former president of the St. Louis BattleHawks XFL franchise.

A number of St. Louis Cardinal affiliates are on board for the partnership, including the Memphis Redbirds, Springfield Cardinals and St. Lucie Mets.

“Over the past few years, we have seen the fans of Minor League Baseball truly embrace Marvel-themed games, so having a nearly league-wide partnership will allow us to take creativity and storytelling to the next level,” Mike Pasciullo, Marvel Entertainment’s Vice President, Product Development and Marketing – Brand, Franchise & Sports said in a news release. “And it wouldn’t be Marvel if we did not have a few major surprises to unveil along the way!”

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St. Louis City Police continue to search for driver in fatal hit and run

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St. Louis City Police continue to search for driver in fatal hit and run

ST. LOUIS – St. Louis City Police continue to search for a driver who hit and killed a woman Wednesday morning in north St. Louis.

Police say the tragedy all unfolded near the intersection of North Grand Boulevard and St. Louis Avenue where a woman was hit by a red pickup truck around 6 a.m. The driver fled the scene.

The woman was pronounced dead at the scene.

Bommarito Automotive Group SKYFOX was over the scene. 

Residents say this is a very busy and dangerous intersection and they want something done to slow traffic down to help prevent another deadly crash.

Jimmie Willie who lives on Grand walks frequently and says he has become numb to the wrecks. Willie says the most common causes are drivers speeding and disregarding stop signs.

”There are a lot of hit and runs around here. It’s been a lot of that going around here, and it’s sad to say people don’t stop and deal with the consequences. Maybe if they stop, they would not be in trouble when they got caught,” he said.  

One resident who did not want to be identified says, “It’s a sad thing to get killed and it’s a hit and run. They need to do something about this. It’s been going on too long.”

The crash closed the intersection and roads early Wednesday morning as police reconstructed the crash.

A spokesperson with the St. Louis Mayor’s Office says a lot of aldermen have speed humps coming to their wards. However, the city cannot install speed humps on major thoroughfares like Grand, so other measures for mitigating speeding will have to be considered to get people to slow down.  

St. Louis City Police encourage anyone with information about the hit and run to contact St. Louis City Police.   

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Circus Flora is back to amaze audiences at Grand Center

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Circus Flora is back to amaze audiences at Grand Center

ST. LOUIS – After a hiatus due to the pandemic, feats of daring and wonder have resumed in Grand Center. Normally performed in early Summer, Circus Flora is back for its 35th season under the iconic Big Top.

“Typically, we’re in June. But because of the pandemic, we, like everybody else, had to adjust our timetables and the way we do things,” said managing director Karen Shoulders. “So we decided to try this fall run and, so far, it’s been lovely.”

The European-style one-ring circus blends modern performance with traditional circus arts.  This year, it’s the “Trial of the Century,” where the Big Top becomes the courtroom and the acrobats become the evidence.

“There are some courtroom hijinks. The wonderful audience is the jury this year so there is a little bit of a whodunit that you might need to solve when you come out.”

Circus Flora has brought together acts from around the globe and from right here in St. Louis. Pennsylvania-based comedian and contortionist Jonathan Burns is one of them.

“It’s my first time performing at Circus Flora. It’s my first time ever being in the circus,” he said.

Burns, like so many performers, is excited to be back at his craft after COVID-19.

“For the past year and half, I’ve been performing to a camera in my basement,” he said. “So, this is nice to be out and actually hear laughter. People laughing at me in person and on purpose.”

Circus Flora is requiring proof of vaccination for everyone 12 and up or a negative COVID-19 test. Masks are also required.

“We have the tent walls off…up. So, it’s nice and safe and open air. It’s been really wonderful, and the audiences are coming back,” Shoulders said.

And it’s the energy of those audiences that makes these performers so grateful to be back

“This is what we do best: bring the magic of the circus to everybody. We need to interact with our audiences. We want to leave this tent feeling better than when they came in,” Shoulders said.

Tickets for “Trial of the Century” begin at just $15 and performances run through the end of October. Circus Flora hopes to return to its regular June scheduling in 2022.

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Cows walk down Missouri highway after escape from processing plant

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Cows walk down Missouri highway after escape from processing plant

BLUE SPRINGS, Mo. – Holy cow! Drivers in Blue Springs couldn’t believe their eyes Wednesday afternoon.

The police department said a bull and two cows escaped from the Valley Oaks meat processing plant. The animals ran through town and even up and down 7 Highway.

The police department said the bull ended up on the football field at Blue Springs High School’s Freshman Campus. Officers said it displayed aggressive behavior and was determined to be a threat to people. Because of that, officers said they had to euthanize the animal.

The two cows are still on the loose, and police are working to corral them. Officers said the cows are in an area away from people at this time.

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Central Illinois man credits service dog for saving his life during a health emergency

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Central Illinois man credits service dog for saving his life during a health emergency

CHILLICOTHE, Ill. – Where Robbie Stouffer goes, his service dog Carolyn follows.

“Goes to work with me, she goes to doctor’s appointments with me, shopping,” Stouffer said.

The central Illinois man has been working with Carolyn for about a year.

“We started to build a bond,” Stouffer said.

He said the pair have been together since she was two months old.

“Carolyn is a sweet, very sweet dog. Very smart,” Stouffer said.

He’s training her through Freedom Paws Service Dogs Foundation.

“Almost right away, I mean within a couple of training sessions, we realized this is a match,” said Freedom Paws Service Dogs CEO Corey James.

The organization helps veterans living with post-traumatic stress disorder.

“The fact that we’re able to do this at no cost to the veteran is amazing,” James said.

Stouffer said Carolyn can even sense how he’s feeling.

“She was getting kind of goofy, wouldn’t leave me alone, kept wanting to sit on me,” Stouffer said.

Two weeks ago, Carolyn noticed when Stouffer’s chest started to hurt.

“I had a heart attack and I didn’t know it was happening,” Stouffer said.

He said Carolyn was alerting him something was off.

“I picked up my phone and then she sat down. And I thought this is kind of weird, weird behavior,” Stouffer said.

He called 911 and help was on the way.

“I unlocked the door as she [dispatcher] requested, and then I hit the floor,” Stouffer said.

At the hospital, doctors inserted a stent. Hours later, Carolyn was back by his side. Stouffer said through it all, he’s grateful Carolyn was there.

“It’s better than your best friend. I can’t really really explain the security and the feeling that someone’s there,” Stouffer said.

Freedom Paws Service Dogs is a non-profit organization and James said its volunteers keep it running. People can donate to the mission here.

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8 Colorado high school football games to watch in Week 8

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8 Colorado high school football games to watch in Week 8

Class 5A

No. 2 Cherry Creek (6-1) vs. No. 8 Arapahoe (6-1)

When/where: 7 p.m. Friday at LPS Stadium

Last meeting: Cherry Creek 49, at Arapahoe 7, Nov. 6, 2020

Arapahoe is off to its best start in six years, and now faces its biggest test of the season. The Bruins are fresh off a down-to-the-wire 21-13 victory over Grandview last week. That win marked the first time a Colorado team came within single digits of Creek since its 5A state semifinal win over Pomona in November 2019. The Warriors have an explosive offense (36.4 points per game), but can they light up the scoreboard against junior OLB Blake Purchase (11.0 sacks) and the dominating Creek defense (10.7 points allowed per game)?

No. 6 Arvada West (6-1) vs. Pomona (4-3)

When/where: 7 p.m. Friday at NAAC Stadium

Last meeting: Pomona 33, at Arvada West 14, Oct. 31, 2020

After an 0-2 start, Pomona has found its footing under new coach Nate Johnson with four wins in five weeks. That included a 17-3 upset of Ralston Valley last Thursday that might’ve been the Panthers’ best defensive performance of the season. Now comes a date with A-West, 6-1 for the first time since 2009 and looking to end a nine-game losing skid against their cross-town rivals. Wildcats QB Ethan Cook has gone atomic, throwing for 907 yards and eight TDs over the past three weeks (all wins). In the Pomona defense — 10 points allowed total the past two weeks — he will find a worthy adversary.

No. 3 Legend (6-1) vs. Douglas County (6-1)

When/where: 6 p.m. Friday at Douglas County Stadium

Last meeting: Legend 42, at Douglas County 14, Nov. 14, 2020

Douglas County’s run as 5A’s Cinderella upstart took a detour last weekend with a humbling 35-7 loss at Pine Creek. Things don’t get any easier this week with red-hot Legend on the docket. The Titans have won five in a row since losing to Mullen in Week 2, culminating with last week’s 42-41 shootout win over Regis Jesuit that saw quarterback Colton Warner complete 13 of 25 passes for 422 yards, four TDs and one interception. Receiver Jackson Brush has topped 100 yards receiving with two TDs in back-to-back games. Can he make it three in a row?

Castle View (5-2) vs. No. 10 ThunderRidge (6-1)

When/where: 7 p.m. Friday at Shea Stadium

Last meeting: Castle View 42, at ThunderRidge 28, Oct. 17, 2020

ThunderRidge’s bounce back from a disappointing 2020 season (1-5) appears complete after the Grizzlies clinched their third winning season in four years with last week’s 35-16 dismantling of Mountain Vista. Dual threat QB Seth Frasier (1,675 total yards) has been a big part of that renaissance, as has a Grizzlies defense that has 10 turnovers and 35 tackles for loss, including six apiece from juniors Ethan Hill, Gavin Olshan and Kaden Shouse. A win over Castle View would put them squarely in the 5A Douglas County League title conversation.

Class 4A

Chatfield (5-2) vs. No. 7 Golden (7-0)

When/where: 6 p.m. Thursday at NACC Stadium

Last meeting: Chatfield 36, vs. Golden 14, Oct. 30, 2020

Those wondering if the Demons are for real are about to find out. The lowest ranked of 4A’s four unbeaten teams, Golden closes out the regular season with its three toughest opponents (Chatfield, Dakota Ridge and Bear Creek) in succession. QB Jazel Riley IV (1,530 total yards) is the engine of a Demons offense that averages 35.4 points per game. While the Chargers are smarting following a 14-10 loss to Bear Creek, they remain a significant road block.

No. 6 Loveland (6-1) vs. Longmont (4-3)

When/where: 11 a.m. Saturday at Ray Patterson Stadium

Last meeting: Loveland 50, at Longmont 21, Nov. 6, 2020

Ever since a 50-6 humbling at the hands of Erie — a game QB Keegan Patterson (2,137 passing yards) missed — the Trojans have landed nothing but haymakers in piling up 145 points, 1,353 total yards and three double-digit wins. Now comes a chance for Longmont to prove it has staying power. Loveland hasn’t lost a game to 4A competition in 15 games, and the Red Wolves haven’t been scored upon in eight quarters. At just 6.3 points allowed per game, Loveland may possess the best defense in 4A. As strength-vs-strength matchups go, this one should be a hoot.

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Missouri Supreme Court asked to intervene in Politte murder case

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Missouri Supreme Court asked to intervene in Politte murder case

Attorneys for Michael Politte, who was convicted at age 14 of killing his mother, have filed a petition asking the Missouri Supreme Court to free him after more than 22 years behind bars, citing now-disproven evidence, a faulty investigation, and a flawed trial defense.

The motion was filed Wednesday.

Rita Politte was burned to death inside her mobile home in Hopewell, Missouri, in 1998.

Politte, now 37, was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison after being tried as an adult. He is housed at the Jefferson City Correctional Center.

By JIM SALTER, Associated Press

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“The Governor” Evan Battey a coach on the floor for CU Buffs men’s basketball

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“The Governor” Evan Battey a coach on the floor for CU Buffs men’s basketball

SAN FRANCISCO — From the end of the 2019-20 college basketball season, when the NCAA Tournament was abruptly canceled at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, through last year’s crowd-less, constantly juggled season, the adversity in many cases fueled a fresh appreciation for the game among coaches and players alike.

For Evan Battey, it was just another hurdle to conquer in a career that has been full of them.

Colorado’s fifth-year senior forward on Wednesday brought his infectious enthusiasm to the stage at the annual Pac-12 Conference men’s basketball media day. Although the Buffs began preseason workouts two weeks ago, the event serves as a sort of unofficial tip-off to the Pac-12 basketball season.

Battey was the only fifth-year senior to land a spot on the 10-player preseason all-conference team as voted upon by league media members, and the event continued his evolution as a sturdy forward who also happens to be a thoughtful future coach and well-respected campus leader.

“I don’t want to look back on my college experience and have regrets,” Battey said. “I think my mentality in approaching everything that way reflects on my friendships and relationships. I’m very involved. I like people. I’m excited to carry on my future endeavors, but I’m definitely going to miss this place.”

Battey has made no secret of his intention to one day be a college basketball coach. His pedigree as a player — he has averaged 9.0 points and 5.1 rebounds in 100 games over the past three seasons — tells only part of the story why Battey likely is destined to an effective coach.

The 6-foot-8 forward missed two full seasons, his senior year in high school and his true freshman year at CU, due basically to bureaucratic red tape. While sitting out that freshman year, Battey suffered a frightening stroke that threatened to take basketball away from him completely.

While emerging as a steady frontcourt presence for the Buffs, Battey has become a sort of man of the people around campus. He is a regular attendee of the games for his CU athletics brethren, and any photo of Battey at a football game typically includes dozens of his schoolmates jockeying for screen space behind his ample frame.

The nickname “The Mayor” already has been anointed upon former CU guard Spencer Dinwiddie. But head coach Tad Boyle has an equally appropriate nickname for Battey.

“If Spencer is ‘The Mayor’ then Evan is ‘The Governor,’” Boyle said. “Spencer was great, don’t get me wrong, but Evan has taken it to another level.”

Boyle has so much respect for Battey’s basketball acumen that CU’s head coach did something that might be unthinkable for other Division I head coaches. Faced with a staff opening earlier this year when former Buffs guard Nate Tomlinson left his position as CU’s Director of Player Development to take an assistant coach job at George Mason, Boyle decided to call Battey before he began interviews for the position.

Not because he wanted Battey’s input on who to hire, but because Boyle was willing to wait a year to fill the spot if Battey wanted to begin his coaching career as soon as his college playing days were over. Yet Boyle said he has never had a player as ready to become a coach at such as young age as Battey.

“Not in terms of being ready that early, no,” Boyle said. “When I had the opening on the staff it occurred to me I’d better check with Evan. I called him about eight o’clock one night, and I asked him where he wanted to be a year from now. And if he said coaching, I would’ve held the position open for him. That’s how much I think of him. He wants to play professional basketball, so he’s going to play that out. But whenever he’s ready, I’ll hire him tomorrow.”

The shift from a veteran team, which won a first-round game at the NCAA Tournament in March with Battey and his since-departed classmates leading the way, to a young group high on talent but short on experience is teaching Battey the future coach new lessons in patience.

“Every day in life, for me, is a learning process,” Battey said. “Every day is different. I try to teach the young guys, and when they mess up, I try not to overreact. That comes with patience. That comes with timing. You can say a thing at the wrong time and it can come off disrespectful. I’m trying to toe that line of when to lead, when to say something and when to not. I’m trying to master that every day.”

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