Connect with us

Tech

The History of Canine Freestyle

Published

on

Canine Freestyle also known as doggie dancing began developing recently in the early 1990s when several dog trainers from around the world started practicing their obedience routines and heelwork to music. With music playing in the background, it was natural to want to do the doggie boogie and start choreographing their movements to fit the music.

At first it was simply heelwork to music in which the dog and handler move as one with the dog close to the handler’s side as they walk around the ring performing some basic obedience moves. Mary Rae from England, and Carolyn Scott from the United States were two of the first more famous dog trainers to start performing their heelwork to music. Today heelwork to music is still a category of doggie dancing.

From there people started getting more creative and began borrowing ideas and movements from dressage. Movement became more free and creative. Handlers began moving with their dogs in lateral, diagonal, circular and backward movements. Trainers opened up their heelwork to include five positions, the right heel, left heel, front heel, follow position and middle heel where the dog is between your legs. People found canine freestyle to be a liberating space where anything could go unlike the strict obedience, rally and agility areas where certain moves were expected at certain spots at certain times. Canine Freestyle training develops a more balanced, agile and happy dog than other dog sports. In fact having a happy dog that has a good connection with the handler is one of the requirements and judging aspects of the sport. Doggie Dancing is the sport where tails wag.

Agility movements were introduced as people developed a wide variety of creative jumping tricks such as jumping through your arms, jumping over your back, rebounding off your waist. People also started having their dogs weave through their legs. First forward then backward, while crawling and even doing figure eights. Weaving became a foundational move in canine freestyle.

Carolyn Scott and Rookie, her golden retriever, awed the audiences with their very musical style of dancing together. Their most popular routine being performed to Grease. Then other trainers started telling stories and being comedic or dramatic with their routines. Attila and Fly will always be remembered for their Charlie Chapman routine and their Gladiator routine. Both are quite classics.

Canine Freestyle is such an awesome sport because any dog of any age any breed and even handicapped dogs can participate and compete. This sport allows dog and handlers to choose movements and songs that suit them with no strict requirements of what you must do. You can easily train in the comfort of your own home, yard or park. No special equipment is needed. There is no special need to train in a class. Although training with others always helps with overcoming distractions and helping you to develop ideas better. People of all ages can enjoy this sport from young children to elderly people in wheelchairs, or walkers. It is great exercise for the dog and handler but easy to do with whatever physical limitations one might have.

Whether you are training to dance for your friends and show off all the cool tricks and moves you know, or volunteering at a nursing home or entertaining people at a park. You can take your show to the road and compete in a variety of different competitive organizations or just enjoy performing your dance routines. Doggie Dancing is the fun dog sport to train.

google news

Tech

Unbiased Ex2 System Review

Published

on

By

Problems come in different forms and shapes. If you are having problems with your relationship right now because of breakup, it is just normal. But don’t fall into depression because that is where the problem becomes abnormal. If you are looking for a solution on how to restore the relationship, you can count on e-books that will provide you information about the techniques and strategies to get an ex back.

But to get the one that can meet your needs, you have to read reviews because they will tell you what is ideal and what is not. In this regard, you can try to read the Ex2 System review. This article will provide you with an unbiased review of this e-book.

Matt Hudson – The Creator

The creator of this e-book is the relationship expert Matt Hudson. He used his expertise in psychology to solve the problems of people when it comes to their relationship. In this book, you can read the step by step ways on how you can take advantage of female psychology and her hot emotional buttons. So, you will be influenced on how to be a real man.

The Don’ts

There are things that you should not do right after the breakup. They are what you need to learn in order to ascertain your success in getting your ex back. Of course, to make sure that everything will be successful, there are also do’s.

The other things that you will know are the secrets that you need to know to win back your ex and the ways on how to make her love you even more and never get dumped again.

Now that you already know what this guide can provide you, it is time to discover its advantages and disadvantages.

The Pros

According to the majority of users, this guide is complete that is why it is perfect to use. There is also a money back guarantee within the first 60 days of purchase. So, if this e-book is not working for you, you can still return it and have your money back. You will also feel satisfaction because of the special bonus guide entitled ‘How To Train Your Girlfriend?’

The Cons

Yes, this guide uses lots of psychological tricks to get your ex back but some of them might be dirty. This is so far the only disadvantage of this book.

Hope this unbiased Ex2 System review helps.

google news
Continue Reading

Tech

Halloween – UK History and Traditions

Published

on

By

The festival of Halloween in the UK is over 2000 years old, dating back to the time of the Celts (600 BC-50 AD). The Celts celebrated the end of summer and the gathering in of the harvest with a festival called ‘Samhain’, which took place on the night of 31 October. Even then, this date had links with ghosts and the spirit world, as on this night the Celts believed that the boundaries between our world and the next would weaken, allowing the souls of dead to cross over and communicate with the living. A large part of the celebration involved the building of huge bonfires, which were thought to welcome friendly spirits and ancestors, but ward off those considered dangerous. People would dress up in animal heads and skins, and burn sacrifices and gifts in thanks for the harvest.

Samhain was also a time for divination and the telling of fortunes. Apples feature widely in these divination techniques. For example, when bobbing for apples, a tradition that still survives until today, the first person to take a bite out of an apple would be the first to marry that year. In addition, when peeling an apple, the longer the unbroken length of peel, the longer you would be destined to live.

Following the invasion of the Romans in 43 AD, two Roman festivals came to be celebrated at the same time as Samhain. The first was Feralia, a day when the Romans commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day in which they honoured Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit trees who was symbolized by the apple. The Romans were very open to the cultures of people they invaded, and they sought to merge their beliefs with those of the indigenous Celts. It is perhaps easy to see why these two festivals became linked closely with Samhain.

Christianity had spread into Celtic lands by the 800s and the Christian church appears to have practiced its usual policy of adopting pagan celebrations by converting Halloween into a Christian observance. By moving the old Christian festival of All Saints Day to 1 November, however, they maintained the link with remembering the dead. On All Saints Day, a mass was held to honour the saints and martyrs, and this was preceded on the day before (All Hallow’s Eve or Eve of All Saints – in Old English, hallow meant holy) by an overnight vigil. According to the early Christian church, this day also marked the release from purgatory of all souls for 2 days. All Souls Day, which commemorated the faithful departed, followed on 2 November. Together, the three festivals – the Eve of All Saints, All Saints Day and All Souls Day – became known as Hallowmass.

The custom of ‘trick-or-treating’, today a large part of Halloween celebrations, could possibly have part of its roots in the tradition of the baking of soul cakes. This was an important feature of All Souls’ Day (similar to the way we associate hot cross buns with Good Friday today), when beggars would wander from house to house, receiving gifts of food and money. In return for a soul cake, these ‘soulers’ would be expected to say prayers for those who had recently died, to speed up their passage through purgatory and into heaven. The ‘trick’ part of the custom appears to have arisen in the USA in the 1930s, where Halloween became to be associated with the playing of pranks and jokes.

Although the Church was successful in establishing Hallowmass as a Christian festival, many of the populace continued to practice the ancient customs and traditions linked with Samhain. With the reformation of the Church in the 16th century, celebrations of this sort were discouraged even more. However, following the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 many traditional Halloween practices, especially the building of bonfires, were transposed to 5 November (now known as Bonfire or Guy Fawkes Night). Although in England the celebration of Halloween gradually fell out of fashion in favour of Bonfire Night, the tradition was maintained for longer in both Ireland and Scotland, because of the strong Celtic links in these countries.

The resurgence in the celebration of Halloween that we have seen over the past 20 years or so, with its emphasis on dressing up as ghosts and witches, has largely been imported from the USA. Halloween and its more pagan traditions were first brought to the USA in the mid-1800s, when huge numbers of Irish immigrants fled to the USA following the Irish Potato Famine. Over time, the festival and its traditions evolved and crossed back over the Atlantic – giving us the celebration that we know and love (or hate!) today.

Conclusion
The celebration that we today know as Halloween dates back to an ancient festival of the Celts – Samhain. Despite the passing of 2000 years, it is still possible to trace some of the traditions we associate with Halloween – bonfires, and the link with ghosts and the spirit world – back to this early celebration of the end of summer and the gathering in of the harvest.

Sources:

  • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween
  • woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/Halloween/history.htm
  • ucc.ie/fecc/samhain.html
  • bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/holydays/halloween.shtml
  • americancatholic.org/Features/halloween/
  • chalicecentre.net/samhain.htm
  • bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/paganism/holydays/samhain.shtml
  • new-life.net/halowen1.htm
  • hauntedbay.com/history/bobbing.shtml
  • britainexpress.com/History/Celtic_Britain.htm
  • britainexpress.com/History/Roman_invasion.htm
google news
Continue Reading

Tech

How to Become a Street Photographer

Published

on

By

Street photography is probably one of he most difficult genres of photography, as it is based on the unknown. You can select a frame shot, but you can never select the characters in it or how they will behave to make your picture look good. In modern terms you could call street photography an art snapshot. It is a snapshot after all.

There are street photographers who are like ghosts. You don’t notice them and you certainly don’t notice them photographing you. They carry small cameras and they have learned the trick of focusing the lens by judging the distance between the subject and the camera and adjusting the focus ring based on that distance. Basically, they shoot from the hip, with wide lenses to compensate for framing defects as they don’t actually see the frame, they can only guess it. With such a behavior, it is normal not to see them. They are not paparazzi, but the people tend to control themselves when a person aims a camera at them. By shooting without their knowledge, you can capture genuine expressions which are the heart of street photography.

Stalk people. It’s not illegal on the street. See a person you like, walk with them, follow them until you can get a shot of them. Go for public places so you won’t get the police on your head. Try to follow facial expressions and move like lightning when one that you like comes up. It’s all in the expression, and that’s what you’re supposed to be hunting. Never take close shots. Make the subject and the surroundings a part of your composition. Some bland in, some stand out, but that’s the diversity and the fun of it. A suit and tie in an abandoned factory looks better than a homeless in an abandoned factory. Contrast is the key.

Carry small equipment. Do not go street photographing with big heavy cameras and lenses that look like bazookas, people will notice you right away. Use small cameras, the smallest possible, because quality is not an issue. the best street photography in the world has some of the worst image quality as well.

Always ask for permission afterward. Take your shots, then talk to your subjects. It is extremely unfair and annoying to them to find out they were photographed later on, when your work becomes public. Respect them and, if required, respect their privacy.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending