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UK counterterror officers lead probe in lawmaker’s slaying

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UK counterterror officers lead probe in lawmaker’s slaying

LEIGH-ON-SEA, England — A long-serving member of Parliament was stabbed to death Friday during a meeting with constituents at a church in England, an attack that united Britain’s fractious politicians in shock and sorrow. A 25-year-old man was arrested at the scene.

Police said that counterterrorism officers were leading the investigation into the slaying of Conservative lawmaker David Amess but that they had not yet determined whether it was a terrorist attack.

They did not identify the suspect, who was held on suspicion of murder.

“The investigation is in its very early stages,” Essex Police Chief Constable Ben-Julian Harrington said. “It will be for investigators to determine whether or not this is a terrorist incident.”

The slaying came five years after another MP, Jo Cox, was murdered by a far-right extremist in her small-town constituency, and it renewed concern about the risks politicians run as they go about their work representing voters. British politicians generally are not given police protection when they meet with their constituents.

Tributes poured in for Amess from across the political spectrum, as well as from the community he had served for decades. Residents paid tribute to him at a vigil at a church in Leigh-on-Sea.

“He carried that great East London spirit of having no fear and being able to talk to people and the level they’re at,” the Rev. Jeffrey Woolnaugh said at the vigil, attended by about 80 people. “Not all politicians, I would say, are good at that.”

Conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he and his Cabinet were “deeply shocked and heart-stricken.”

“David was a man who believed passionately in this country and in its future, and we’ve lost today a fine public servant and a much-loved friend and colleague,” Johnson said.

The prime minister would not say whether the attack meant politicians needed tighter security, saying, “We must really leave the police to get on with their investigation.”

Amess, 69, was attacked around midday at a Methodist church in Leigh-on-Sea, a town about 40 miles (62 kilometers) east of London. Paramedics tried without success to save him. Police arrested the suspect and recovered a knife.

Amess had been a member of Parliament for Southend West, which includes Leigh-on-Sea, since 1997, and had been a lawmaker since 1983, making him one of the longest-serving politicians in the House of Commons.

A social conservative on the right of his party, he was a well-liked figure with a reputation for working hard for his constituents and campaigning ceaselessly to have Southend declared a city.

Amess, who leaves a wife and five children, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2015 for his service, becoming Sir David.

Flags at Parliament were lowered to half-staff amid a profusion of questions about lawmakers’ security.

“This is an incident that will send shockwaves across the parliamentary community and the whole country,” House of Commons Speaker Lindsay Hoyle said. “In the coming days we will need to discuss and examine MPs’ security and any measures to be taken, but for now, our thoughts and prayers are with David’s family, friends and colleagues.”

Violence against British politicians is rare, but concerns have grown about the increasingly bitter polarization of the country’s politics.

In 2016, a week before the country’s divisive Brexit referendum, Cox, a Labour Party lawmaker, was fatally stabbed and shot in northern England. Also, several people have been jailed in recent years for threatening lawmakers.

British lawmakers are protected by armed police when they are inside Parliament, and security there was tightened after an attacker inspired by the Islamic State group fatally stabbed a police officer at the gates in 2017.

But politicians have no such protection in their constituencies. Amess published the times and locations of his open meetings with constituents on his website.

Two other British lawmakers have been attacked over the past two decades during their “surgeries,” regular meetings where constituents can present concerns and complaints.

Labour legislator Stephen Timms was stabbed in the stomach in 2010 by a student radicalized by online sermons from an al-Qaida-linked preacher.

In 2000, Liberal Democrat Nigel Jones and his aide Andrew Pennington were attacked by a man wielding a sword during such a meeting. Pennington was killed and Jones wounded in the attack in Cheltenham, England.

Former Prime Minister Theresa May, a Conservative, tweeted that Amess’ killing was a “tragic day for our democracy,” and former Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair said he was “shocked and horrified.”

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon of the Scottish National Party said on Twitter: “In a democracy, politicians must be accessible and open to scrutiny, but no one deserves to have their life taken while working for and representing their constituents.”

Kim Leadbeater, Jo Cox’s sister and now a member of Parliament herself, said it was “horrific” that Amess’ family was experiencing what hers had gone through.

“They will think about this every single day for the rest of their lives,” she said.

“I find myself now working as a politician and trying to do good things for people, and it’s really important you get good people in public life, but this is the risk we are all taking, and so many MPs will be scared by this.”

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Lawless reported from London. Pan Pylas also contributed to this report.

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Get Cooking: Meat with “dem bones”

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Get Cooking: Meat with “dem bones”

In the Bible, in the 37th chapter of the Book of Ezekiel, the Lord grants a vision to the prophet as He takes Ezekiel to the Valley of the Dry Bones. God tells Ezekiel how, on the Last Day, he will re-vivify the dry bones, all scattered about pell-mell: He will “breathe life into them” and “attach tendons to them” and “make flesh come onto them.”

This passage in the Scriptures occasioned the anatomy lesson of the great Black spiritual “Dem Bones,” written in the early 1900s, where we learn how all those bones are connected, “the knee bone connected to the thigh bone; the thigh bone connected to the hip bone,” and so on.

Cooks, now hear the word of the Lord.

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Two new Denver bars that’ll feel like vacation in January

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Two new Denver bars that’ll feel like vacation in January

You deserve a vacation this month. But if you’re like me, you aren’t taking one (because the holidays were expensive, because omicron still surges, and because there just isn’t any time for that).

Enter two new Denver destinations where you can at least feel transported for a night. One will take you to Paris by way of Montreal, and the other will give you a taste of Oaxaca and Mexico City all in one bite.

Cantina Loca

This is the Denver tasting room and bar for chef Dana Rodriguez’s own Doña Loca spirits brand. Rodriguez launched her mezcal and tequila line in 2021 and has been planning this cantina extension of it — her first solo restaurant project — all along.

Hi-Rez Photography, Provided by Cantina Loca

Cocktails from Cantina Loca, which specializes in mezcal and tequila drinks made with Doña Loca house spirits.

“This concept is my dream,” Rodriguez said in a release. “It’s the ultimate representation of Mexican culture through food and drink, in an atmosphere that feels like a true Mexico City cantina.”

Why make the trip: If you’ve been to Rodriguez’s restaurants Work & Class and Super Mega Bien (or even if you haven’t) you’ll want to check out this latest addition to the family. It’s a casual cantina with an artistic streak. Local builders FinArt furnished the space on the ground floor of a LoHi extended stay, and muralist John Rumtum warmed up the concrete walls and brickwork with a loving ode to the agave plant.

Order like a local: There are plenty of agave spirit-based cocktails to order (see requisite palomas and margaritas), but you should also peruse the menu of aguas benditas so you can sip the house brand mezcal on its own, in three distinct styles, and also try other traditional Mexican spirits, such as raicilla (pronounced rai-see-yuh) and sotol (pronounced so-toll). See also tacos and snacks such as tempura cactus, or nopales fritos, and stuffed corn sopes, or picaditas vegetarianas.

Exchange rate: Snacks will set you back $7-$13, tacos cost $3.75-$5 and big plates such as pollo adobado and lamb mixiote are priced at $15-$26. Expect to pay $11-$14 for cocktails, and $9-$30 for sipping mezcal. Beers are also available for $5-$8, and four N/A drinks including horchata and chicha morada cost $6.

Travel plan: The cantina is open Sunday-Thursday from 4-10 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 4-11 p.m. It’s closed on Monday and Tuesday, at 2880 Zuni St., and cantinaloca.com.

1642597461 332 Two new Denver bars thatll feel like vacation in January

Provided by Au Feu Brasserie

Au Feu Brasserie is a new French wine bar and restaurant in Wash Park. You’ll find French bottles and cocktails on the menu alongside a strong selection of Cognac, Armagnac and Eau de Vie.

Au Feu Brasserie

Meet a former RiNo food hall stall that’s all grown up and sophisticated in Washington Park. This French-inspired restaurant started out at Zeppelin Station in 2018 but recently advanced to a brick-and-mortar space next door to Uncle ramen on Pennsylvania Street. And the two businesses make for great date-night neighbors, depending on your mood. At the brasserie, owners Jared and Amanda Leonard were inspired by Montreal’s food scene.

“We ate our way through Montreal while researching the Au Feu concept and fell in love with the French culture of the city,” Jared Leonard said in a release. “We were particularly inspired by restaurants like Joe Beef and Au Pied du Cochon.”

Why make the trip: It’s hard to recognize this space that was once occupied by a burger shop. Now it’s all velvet seating and art deco decor, with the air of a Parisian sitting room. Pair that with a barbecue master’s expert food, which includes a mix of French and Canadian influences (see boeuf bourguignon and house poutine), and you’ll start to see why the Leonards are calling it a “casually indulgent” after-work escape.

Au Feu Brasserie is a new ...

Provided by Au Feu Brasserie

Au Feu Brasserie is a new wine bar and restaurant in Wash Park. You’ll find Montreal-inspired French food, such as this short rib bourguignon.

Order like a local: Leonard tapped Dutch sommelier Jeroen Erens to pick the 65-bottle, all-French wine list, so you’ll want to get his input for your drink order. Aside from wine, there’s a great selection of pre-prohibition European-inspired cocktails (Prince of Wales, Fleur de Lis), as well as cognac, armagnac and eau de vie.

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Former CSU Rams football commits search for new opportunities after Jay Norvell pulls scholarship offers

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Former CSU Rams football commits search for new opportunities after Jay Norvell pulls scholarship offers

Bryce Johnson went to Colorado State last summer on a football recruiting visit and left Fort Collins with a dream scholarship offer to play for the Rams.

“It was Division I football and a full ride in your home state,” said Johnson, a star two-way player for Lutheran High School, and a finalist for The Denver Post’s annual Gold Helmet Award. “That’s a huge opportunity. I jumped on that right away.”

Johnson’s dream turned into a nightmare six months later.

That’s because Johnson’s commitment became null and void in December after the program hired former Nevada coach Jay Norvell to replace fired Steve Addazio as head coach. Johnson is not alone. Norvell’s re-evaluation of the Rams’ 2022 recruiting class led to offers being pulled for a handful of local commits seen as improper fits.

Among those taking their spots: previous Nevada commits and transfers.

“Their staff came in with an entirely different scheme on both sides of the ball. They had a lot of changes that needed to be made. So, they ended up pulling my scholarship to use in the JUCO and transfer portal,” said Johnson, who is now considering New Mexico State, South Dakota State and others. “They talked to me about blue-shirting and getting me in the 2023 class. But they said that wasn’t approved by their compliance.”

Norvell didn’t hide from that uncomfortable truth when speaking to reporters last month during the early signing period.

“It’s not a thing that people like to hear,” Norvell said back on Dec. 15. “That they had a scholarship, they had committed (to CSU) and you’ve got a new coaching staff and you kind of have to start all over again. It’s unfortunate. But it is the reality.”

Where do those former commits go from here? CSU’s 2022 sendoffs are scrambling for new opportunities. Highlands Ranch tight end Jade Arroyo — with 107 career receptions for 1,515 yards and 16 touchdowns — pledged to the Rams back in July. He’s now considering multiple Ivy League programs.

“It’s kind of hard right now. Most schools have already filled up their class for this year,” Arroyo said. “Especially with COVID, there are limited scholarships. I’m just talking to schools with coaches (direct messaging) me on Twitter. I’m just trying to build relationships at the moment.”

The list goes on: Arapahoe outside linebacker Jareb Ramos is also no longer committed to the Rams but recently picked up a scholarship offer from Penn. Addazio’s staff stayed close to home offering scholarships at Fort Collins High School to wide receiver Dorion McGarity and safety Dontay Johnson. Neither player signed with the Rams and their college destinations are still undetermined.

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