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Union: 97 percent of SLPS members complied with vaccine mandate

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Union: 97 percent of SLPS members complied with vaccine mandate

COLUMBIA, Mo. – A new state-of-the-art research building on the University of Missouri’s campus could bring patients from across the state to Columbia for health care. 

Missouri Chief Capitol Bureau Reporter Emily Manley is the only reporter who’s been inside the building before next week’s grand opening and spoke with health officials and building directors about the Roy Blunt NextGen Precision Health Building. 

Inside the 265,000 square foot building, there’s an MRI machine found nowhere else in the state. There are labs the size of football fields, a unit that allows researchers to conduct human trials and space to produce pharmaceutical drugs.

Researchers and those in charge of the building say this building puts Columbia and Mizzou on the map for health care. 

“The whole goal is to improve the health of Missourians,” executive director for the building Dr. Richard Barohn said. “This building is a game-changer for the University of Missouri. It really puts us in the heart of the conversation of how you can improve health.”

After breaking ground in 2019, Mizzou is ready to open the doors on its new $221 million dollar research building. 

“Science has evolved to the point where it’s different than just going to your typical health care provider 30 or 40 years ago,” Barohn said. “Now with the advent of precision health tools, we can really deliver a different type of health care.”

Barohn, a neurologist that specializes in muscle and nerve disease, says precision health research involves looking at genetic, behavioral, and imaging factors. 

Inside the new facility, researchers will be looking closely at things like cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. 

“It’s approximately a football field’s worth of open wet lab space where our teams of scientists that study similar disorders can work together,” associate director of the building Dr. Scott Rector said. Rector said the open space concept could lead to fast findings. 

“Traditionally it takes about 20 years to go from a discovery at the bench to getting that into a patient,” Rector said. “We hope that the philosophy in the building would be that we could expedite that process and get to that endpoint more quickly.”

In the basement, there’s an MRI machine found nowhere else in Missouri. 

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MBTA to cut back bus routes Dec. 19, citing workforce shortages

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MBTA to cut back bus routes Dec. 19, citing workforce shortages

Amid a national workforce shortage cutting across industries, the MBTA has not been spared.

The agency announced that, starting Dec. 19, bus service and Mattapan line service will be scaled back to accommodate employee attrition, which is outpacing new hires.

“Like other transit systems across the country, the MBTA is experiencing significant challenges in attracting the workforce needed to meet demands for service,” MBTA General Manager Steve Poftak said. “The MBTA is budgeted for a full level of service, and ready to add back services when we have hired and trained new bus and train operators.”

Poftak added in his comments that teams at the MBTA are working to streamline the hiring process and encouraged those interested in applying to head to mbta.com/apply.

The MBTA’s winter schedule will focus on maintaining service for routes with “durable ridership,” on routes with crowded buses and on supporting those returning to in-person work and school. The routes will also be adapted to new, COVID-induced travel patterns.

Buses will reduce in frequency by about one in every 20 scheduled trips, with many of the changes reducing frequency on weekdays, especially in the morning.

Several other bus changes are going into effect later this month. Route 111, with service to and from Woodlawn, will operate a simplified service pattern this winter, and Routes 62 and 76, which run between Alewife and the Bedford VA Hospital, will resume rush-hour weekday service.

The MBTA will hold a public information session Dec. 8 at 6 p.m. to discuss the changes. People can learn more about the affected routes at mbta.com/servicechanges.

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First snowfall of the season for many in Massachusetts could impact evening commute

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First snowfall of the season for many in Massachusetts could impact evening commute

It’s time to dig out your winter boots and snow brush for your car.

Wednesday will bring the first snowfall of the season for many across the Bay State, as meteorologists predict a widespread 1 to 2 inches of snow, with lower amounts along the coast.

While the light snowfall totals look to be minor, much of the snow will fall during the evening commute, so officials are urging people to plan for extra travel time and slow down on the roads.

“Not only will you be safer on snow if you curb your speed, you’ll have greater ability to stop if you need to,” said Mary Maguire of AAA Northeast. “Allow for more distance between your vehicle and the car in front of you. This will provide you with more stopping distance if you need to brake.”

The best chance for accumulation looks to be between 4 p.m. and midnight, and the best shot for higher snow amounts would be toward the Worcester Hills.

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation advised people to clean snow off their vehicle, and to make sure their windshield wipers work and they have windshield washer fluid.

“So ask any Cop who has been on the job for few years which day normally has the most motor vehicle crashes? Answer: First snowfall of the year,” the Hanson Police Department tweeted. “Slow down, be safe, and keep your insurance rates down.”

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Biden re-election poll shows dismal 22% support; Harris even worse at 12%

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Biden re-election poll shows dismal 22% support; Harris even worse at 12%

The numbers are cringeworthy — 22% and 12%.

That’s the support for President Biden and his VP Kamala Harris in an I&I/TIPP poll that asked who would you vote for in the 2024 election. Even if you doubt the veracity of all this polling, these are poor numbers.

The only good news for Biden, the survey adds, is “no favorite has emerged among the large field of potential challengers to run against Biden in the 2024 primaries.”

But the sinking survey results are not out of the norm. A Wall Street Journal poll out Tuesday pegged Biden’s approval rating at a dismal 41%. Rasmussen had it at 42%.

Congress, however, was at 22% in the Journal poll, but that’s another story.

“It’s undeniable. Joe Biden is hurting in the polls right now and it’s due to a number of factors,” said Erin O’Brien, associate professor of political science at UMass Boston.

Those factors, she said, include the nagging pandemic, soaring inflation, lingering doubts about Biden’s foreign policy chops after the botched pullout from Kabul and lingering legislation.

The Journal adds that with Biden flatlining in the polls, he won’t be in a position to help Democrats fighting to keep their jobs in the midterms.

This comes as Democrats hold a slim majority in the House, where the split is 221-213, and in the Senate, at 50-50, but with Harris as the tiebreaker.

Support for former President Donald Trump remains strong among those loyal to him, so that also could be reflected in the polling that shows Biden needs to rebound or it will be too late to get much done in the second half of his tenure.

Now Biden faces a new challenge.

He held a video conference Tuesday with Russia’s Vladimir Putin over Russian troops heading toward the Ukrainian border.

Just hours before the call got underway, the Associated Press reported that Ukrainian officials charged Russia was continuing to escalate the crisis by sending tanks and snipers to war-torn eastern Ukraine to “provoke return fire.”

Republicans are watching to see how Biden fares, considering how poorly his administration handled withdrawal from Afghanistan.

It’s all showing in the polls, with the Journal adding 63% of voters said the country had gone off-track, with just 27% saying the nation was on the right course. Some 61% said the economy was headed in the wrong direction.

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