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McCaughey: Dems go on the attack against smart kids

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McCaughey: Dems go on the attack against smart kids

Parents whose kids excel in school need to be on guard. Leftist school administrators across the country are banning gifted programs in elementary and middle school and Advanced Placement courses in high school.

Typically, without any notice to parents, an eighth-grader’s accelerated science class or a fifth-grader’s fast-track math class is merged into the regular classroom. Top students lose out. They need accelerated programs every bit as much as children with learning challenges need special education. It’s discrimination.

The left is seizing on a newly published study of Ohio students from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute to call for banning gifted programs. The study, “Ohio’s Lost Einsteins,” looks at what became of second- and third-grade students who were identified as high performers. By eighth grade, only 30% of Black students, 39% of Hispanic students and 34% of economically disadvantaged students in the group were still outstanding performers. Most had floundered.

The study also underscores the importance of helping gifted children early on overcome barriers to success. They may lack a place to study and, most importantly, an involved parent. Some parents don’t insist their children do their homework, concentrate in class and aim for AP classes. These parents need guidance on buying into the educational achievement culture.

Instead, school administrators are scapegoating gifted kids for the sake of equity. Boston suspended enrollment in its Advanced Work Classes program for fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders, citing the fact that the school district is 80% Black and Hispanic, but AWC enrollment is 70% white and Asian.

The rhetoric attacking gifted programs is vicious and divisive. The Hechinger Report, based at Columbia University’s Teachers College, claims “gifted education has racism in its roots,” arguing that the scientist who popularized IQ measurement was a eugenicist.

California proposes eliminating accelerated math before 11th grade and requiring all students to study math together. “We reject ideas of natural gifts and talents,” the state’s math plan declares.

Educators are peddling a false claim that students of mixed abilities learn better together. A website addressed to school administrators deplores tracking as “segregation” and announces, “It’s good for students to be in classrooms where there’s a robust exchange of perspectives; perspectives that are shaped by racial, ethnic and economic identities.” Maybe in homeroom or social studies, but not physics. Gifted children in slow classes grow bored and even drop out.

Leftist educators are also targeting AP high school classes. But a study by the left-leaning Center for American Progress shows that students who succeed in AP classes have higher grades in college and are more likely to graduate. Eliminating them would be a mistake.

The equity warriors are also attacking the nation’s 165 competitive public high schools. From Boston to Alexandria, Va., and San Francisco, they’re eliminating entrance exams and allocating seats by lottery or zip code.

Georgetown University’s Anthony Carnevale calls it “a direct populist rebellion.” Don’t buy it. The real populism is parents rising up to resist dumbing down their children’s education. These parents know their best shot at the American dream is to have their children succeed in a highly competitive public school. No one should take that away.


Betsy McCaughey is a former lieutenant governor of New York and author of “The Next Pandemic.”

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Health care chain zooms in on LoHi for second Denver location

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Health care chain zooms in on LoHi for second Denver location

ZoomCare is focusing its lens on the Denver market.

The Portland-based health care provider opened its second location in Denver, and fourth in Colorado, last month at 3210 Tejon St. in LoHi.

“Where we place our clinics is part of our proprietary secrets, but LoHi fits the profile of the neighborhoods we like to go into,” said CEO Jeff Fee.

“And with our entrée into Denver, it’s a growing market and has similar market characteristics of our existing markets. Our goal down the road is to become a national brand, and Denver seemed like a good fit for the ZoomCare model.”

ZoomCare, which started as a neighborhood clinic in 2006, has about 60 locations in Oregon, Idaho, Washington and Colorado.

The healthcare provider moved into Colorado last year, when it opened a clinic at 1431 15th St. in LoDo and another in Boulder last year. The company added one in Arvada in June.

The company signed a lease for the 1,080-square-foot LoHi space in April. Endorphin Fitness previously operated there.

ZoomCare has around 1,500 patients in the Denver area, according to Fee. Each clinic has a staff of board-certified providers who cater to a broad range of illnesses and injuries. Patients are able to schedule their urgent, primary and preventive care services in the same day. Rather than having a primary doctor, patients can visit any of the team’s providers at any of its locations across the U.S.

There are also on-site labs and prescriptions, so patients can leave with medication in hand.

Courtesy of ZoomCare

ZoomCare has around 1,500 patients in the Denver area.

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Colorado weather: Major winter storm to drop up to 3 feet of snow

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Colorado weather: Major winter storm to drop up to 3 feet of snow

Winter weather alerts are posted for many mountain regions of Colorado as a potent storm is forecast to move across the state. This storm could drop upwards of 3 feet of snow and will pack winds of 50 mph.

First off, if you have travel plans in the mountains between now and Saturday morning, prepare for intense winter driving conditions with possible closures in numerous areas across the state. Some good travel advice can be found below.

There are two waves of snow coming toward Colorado. One will push through by Thursday morning bringing mountain locations light snow. Another will begin to move through Thursday afternoon and last through Friday, and this second pulse of snow is the one that will really pack a punch.

A deepening area of low pressure is forecast to move over Colorado and as it approaches, moisture will be picked up from the Pacific ocean. What the National Weather Service in Grand Junction is calling an Atmospheric river, an anomalous amount of moisture is supposed to funnel towards Colorado. This is arguably the most important factor of this storm — that several inches of liquid precipitation are going to stack up across the mountains bringing some much-needed drought relief. The current snowpack across Colorado is sitting at 52%t of normal and this storm is likely to give a great boost to the numbers statewide.

From Denver to Colorado Springs, this will be a much different storm as less than a quarter of an inch of moisture is expected — if that.

With moisture levels as high as they will be in the mountains, snowfall rates may exceed 2 inches per hour at times. The heaviest of snows will begin Thursday afternoon and last through Friday morning beginning initially in the northern mountains and then pushing south. Winds will be very high with the storm, gusting up to 50 mph at times. This will further exacerbate driving conditions as snow-packed roads are going to be very common anywhere you travel.

When talking snow totals, wind direction plays a huge role in producing big snows. The way this storm is approaching and how it will flow across our area will bring beneficial winds to just about all mountain ranges. From the San Juans near Wolf Creek and Telluride all the way to the Park Range near Steamboat, this storm is likely to deliver so much snow that we will measure it in feet. That means that major to extreme impacts on roads are possible.

Winter Storm Severity Index

 

Forecast snow totals

The Northern Mountains (including the Gore Range, Park Range, Flat Tops and the Gore Range)
1 to 2 feet of snow is expected. This includes areas like Steamboat and Vail.

The Central Mountains (including the Sawatch Mountains and the Elk and West Elk Mountains)
1to 2 feet of snow is expected. This includes areas like Crested Butte, Aspen, Sunlight and Monarch
There could be a few higher totals in these areas.

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Cahokia Heights home catches fire two days in a row

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Cahokia Heights home catches fire two days in a row

CAHOKIA HEIGHTS, Ill. – A home was on fire early Thursday morning in Cahokia Heights, Illinois.

The fire started in the 400 block of Garrison Avenue just before 5 a.m. Flames were seen coming out of the roof of the one-story home.

Neighbors told FOX 2’s Nissan Rogue Runner reporter Jason Maxwell that the house also caught on fire Wednesday. The fire department was able to quickly put that fire out.

The cause of both fires is unknown at this time.

FOX 2 will continue to update this story with more information as it becomes available.

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