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Bruins blitzed in 6-3 loss to Flyers

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Bruins blitzed in 6-3 loss to Flyers

PHILADELPHIA — Poor puck management and shaky goaltending usually produce some unpalatable results, and the Bruins got exactly that in a 6-3 loss to the Philadelphia Flyers at the Wells Fargo Center on Wednesday.

Rookie goalie Jeremy Swayman had the roughest night of his young career, giving up five goals on 24 shots, while some of the skaters in front of him gave equally unsightly performances, especially on the back end.

“(Swayman’s) not going to be perfect every night and he clearly wasn’t tonight. Not his best. We needed some saves there when we broke down,” said coach Bruce Cassidy. “Our breakdowns were bad in front of him. It wasn’t a lot of quantity, but high quality. Mistakes from the back end, it’s losing hockey, is what it is. That’s how you lose games. You do dumb things and good teams come back at you and they finish and that’s what happened.”

Cassidy tweaked his back end, flipping Matt Grzelcyk up to the top pair with Charlie McAvoy and, playing a lot of shifts with the top line, the group of five controlled play when they were on the ice. It’s a strategy Cassidy said he’ll employ again when he feels the size matchup will allow it. But the two bottom pairs did not hold up their end.

After the B’s had erased a 3-1 deficit late in the second period, the Flyers seized the game with three unanswered goals in the third. The slide into oblivion commenced quickly, just 58 seconds into the last period.

Mike Reilly coughed up the puck on a rush through the neutral zone, putting a pass on Joel Farabee’s stick and the former BU Terrier immediately counter-attacked on an odd-man rush with Cam Atkinson. Brandon Carlo could not keep Farabee’s crossing pass from getting to the former BC Eagle and, though Taylor Hall made a good effort to backcheck to prevent Atkinson from getting a good shot off, Swayman could not get over in time to stop the sliding puck for Atkinson’s second of the night.

“I thought the guy just had a good stick,” said Reilly. “I feel like I’d make that play definitely most of the times. But (Farabee) had a good stick, he jumped on it. … I don’t think it was too risky. I just didn’t make the play.”

The Flyers regained their two-goal lead at 11:27 on a shot that, on a good night, Swayman would have had, even though it was a quality chance. From the high slot, Travis Konecny beat Swayman cleanly past the glove to make it 5-3. Sean Couturier added an empty netter to finish it off.

Though the B’s had a big shot advantage (40-25), they never led and were on the chase all night. The hosts took advantage of some over-aggressiveness by the B’s to strike first.

After some heavy Bruin pressure, Derek Forbort was a tick slow to the puck on a pinch attempt along the left boards and Derick Brassard sent Atkinson off on a 2-on-1. With Connor Clifton back, Atkinson decided to keep it and beat Swayman with a wrister that broke through the rookie’s glove at 8:08.

The B’s evened it up at 16:48 with a fourth line goal. Tomas Nosek fed Trent Frederic in the high slot in good shooting position. Frederic’s shot did not make it through to goalie Martin Jones, but it hit a leg in front, then squirted to the left of the net where Karson Kuhlman was to pop home the easy goal at 16:48.

But the B’s could not get out of the period without a deficit, as bad decisions started to mount.

It started with the B’s on the attack, when Flyer defenseman Rasmus Ristolainen buried Charlie Coyle with a big hit against the end boards and then pitchforked him to the ice. Coyle got up in an unhappy mood. Eventually he took a tripping penalty behind the Flyer net at 18:25 and, with 8.9 seconds left in the period, the Flyers cashed in with Farabee collecting the loose change for the goal.

Some more sloppy Bruin play led to a 3-1 Flyer lead at 1:58 of the second period. Keith Yandle tried to set up James van Riemsdyk on a long bank pass off the end boards but when van Riemsdyk caught up to it, he didn’t have much more of an option than to just fire a bad angle shot. That shot, however, produced a fat rebound off Swayman, which went right to Scott Laughton in the slot. Beating Jake DeBrusk and Nick Foligno (who left the game with an upper body injury and will be re-evaluated on Thursday) to the spot, Laughton buried it past Swayman for the two-goal lead.

That Bruin deficit would not last the period.

The B’s got one back at 8:38 on Hall’s first of the year. Charlie McAvoy collected a loose puck along the boards and, catching Ristolainen on a bad change, sent the speedy left wing off on a clean breakaway. Hall made it look easy, scooping the puck over Jones’ glove shoulder to make it 3-2.

McAvoy again figured largely in the tying goalie with just under a minute to play in the second. The defenseman took the puck in deep in, swung out on the left side and put a shot on Jones. David Pastrnak grabbed the rebound and tried to jam it home, but it squirted over to Brad Marchand on the left side and he buried his third goal of the season with 59.4 seconds left in the second to send the game into the third deadlocked at 3-3.

The mistakes kept coming in the third, however, Swayman was not able to absolve his teammates of those miscues and the B’s very much earned their first loss of the season.

Said Swayman: “It stings right now. I’m glad it got out of the way early. I have a lot to learn from it and we’ll move forward from here.”

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Ravens’ Week 15 game vs. Packers pushed back to late-afternoon kickoff

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Ravens’ Week 15 game vs. Packers pushed back to late-afternoon kickoff

The Ravens’ Week 15 home game against the Green Bay Packers has been pushed back to a 4:25 p.m. kickoff, the NFL announced Tuesday. Fox’s telecast of the game had been scheduled to start at 1 p.m. on Dec. 19.

The NFL uses “flexible scheduling” in Weeks 11-18, meaning that, after consultation with its broadcast partners, it can move games into prime-time or late-afternoon slots. The announcements are made no later than 12 days before the game.

The Ravens are 3-0 against NFC North teams this season, edging the Detroit Lions, Minnesota Vikings and Chicago Bears, but Green Bay should be the division’s stiffest test. The 9-3 Packers, led by reigning NFL Most Valuable Player Aaron Rodgers, have the NFC’s second-best record. On Sunday, they knocked off the Los Angeles Rams, 36-28, in Green Bay.

The Ravens’ Week 15 game will be second of three late-afternoon kickoffs in a five-week span. On Sunday and in Week 17, they face the Pittsburgh Steelers and Los Angeles Rams at 4:25 p.m.

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Denver’s homelessness response includes permanent cleanup zone in Five Points, safe outdoor space in Clayton

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Denver’s homelessness response includes permanent cleanup zone in Five Points, safe outdoor space in Clayton

The city of Denver has quietly stepped up its efforts to prevent encampments of homeless people from forming in one downtown neighborhood while also working to provide city land for a sanctioned camping site a few miles away.

City crews are now clearing unhoused people and their belongings from sidewalks and other public rights of way at least three times a week in a roughly 10-block area in the Five Points neighborhood, officials said.

“Permanent, regular cleanups are needed in this area to consistently promote the health and safety of everyone in the area, including those experiencing homelessness … ” Nancy Kuhn, spokeswoman for the city’s Department of Transportation and Infrastructure, said in an emailed statement.

The area identified by officials in late September is bounded by Broadway, Park Avenue, Welton and 20th streets. It’s dotted with signs that mark it a permanent zone for what opponents to the camping ban refer to as sweeps. The permanent cleanup zone was first reported by Westword.

Kuhn said the cleanup actions make the sidewalk accessible so people don’t have to walk in the street and help to mitigate public health risks created by trash, decomposing food, discarded needles, human waste and flammable materials such as propane and gasoline.

RJ Sangosti, The Denver Post

The city of Denver has posted signs marking a new permanent no-camping zone in a portion of Five Points in Denver on Nov. 22, 2021.

Unlike in most encampments cleanups, the city does not provide notice to people camping in the area seven days in advance. The notice rule was established by a federal injunction earlier this year.

“It’s an attempted end-run around the requirements of the preliminary injunction,” Andy McNulty, the attorney who filed the federal lawsuit against the city’s camping ban, said last week. “They are putting up a zone that essentially says you can’t exist here if you’re an unhoused person.”

McNulty and Assistant City Attorney Conor Farley delivered arguments in a hearing with a panel of judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit last week about the merits of the preliminary injunction. The city’s goal was to have the restrictions on its camping ban enforcement powers lifted.

Farley noted in his comments there is a process through which the city can speed up enforcement actions to a 48-hour timetable if an emergency public health risk exists in an encampment but said that is still not soon enough. He also acknowledged the public record is thin on examples of public health emergencies that require a speedier response.

A representative for the City Attorney’s Office declined to comment on the arguments which are still being considered by the judges on the panel. McNulty said the hearing was a demonstration that the city has been disingenuous about its motives for clearing encampments.

“They just want the power to do whatever they want whenever they want with no consequences and they are not happy that someone is actually holding them accountable for once,” he said.

The permanent cleanup area the city marked out in September is the second of its kind, Kuhn said. Another area, roughly outlined by Larimer, Arapahoe, 22nd and 24th streets, is also subject to regular enforcement, she said.

In her emailed statement, Kuhn encouraged people who are homeless to embrace the city services available to them rather than stay on the streets.

“Our shelters have capacity; they are open 24/7, many do not require sobriety, they are safe and clean, and provide essential services to exit homelessness, including case management and rehousing,” she wrote.

Kuhn emailed The Denver Post her statement before a Denver Rescue Mission employee was fatally stabbed at the organization’s shelter for men at 4600 E. 48th Ave. Saturday night.

The potential for violent episodes is just one thing that can keep unhoused people from using the city’s shelter network. Cathy Alderman, chief public policy officer for the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, noted that sleeping in a large, open room with other people is not ideal for everyone and the environment can be triggering for people struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Tiger Woods has little to offer on past accident or future in golf

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Tiger Woods has little to offer on past accident or future in golf

NASSAU, Bahamas — Tiger Woods had nothing to say about the February car crash that shattered his right leg and even less of an idea what his future in golf holds for him except that he’s a long way from deciding whether he can compete against the best.

“I can show up here and I can host an event, I can play a par-3 course, I can hit a few shots, I can chip and putt,” he said Tuesday. “But we’re talking about going out there and playing against the world’s best on the most difficult golf courses under the most difficult conditions.

“I’m so far from that.”

Woods addressed the media for the first time since his Feb. 23 crash on a winding road in the Los Angeles coastal suburbs. Police said he was driving at least 84 mph when he crossed a median and his SUV tumbled down a hill.

Asked his recollection of the accident, Woods said curtly, “All those answers have been answered in the investigation, so you can read about all that there in the police report.” When asked if he had any flashbacks to the trauma, he replied: “I don’t, no. Very lucky in that way.”

He also felt lucky to be alive and to still have his right leg, and to be able to walk into the press center at Albany Golf Club without a noticeable limp.

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