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Denver Fan Expo 2021: Celebs, comics artists and cosplay return to the Mile High City

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Denver Fan Expo 2021: Celebs, comics artists and cosplay return to the Mile High City

The surreal events of the last 18 months, practically ripped from the pages of an apocalyptic novel, have left Denver’s pop-culture fan base with whiplash.

The passionate group of comics-and-cosplay lovers has been without a major gathering since summer 2019, with Denver Pop Culture Con pulling out of its planned 2020 show at the Colorado Convention Center due to the space’s use as a COVID-19 backup hospital (fortunately it’s never been needed).

Since then, there have been huge changes for the formerly nonprofit convention — in name and ownership — but fans can at last celebrate the return of the big event. Now called Denver Fan Expo, it takes place Oct. 29-31 at the Colorado Convention Center.

Single-day tickets are $45-$65 for adults; $35-$50 for kids 13-17; and $10 for kids aged 6-12, via fanexpohq.com/fanexpodenver.

“This year is a special-edition event, so some of the exciting new features will be limited,” said Andrew Moyes, vice president of Toronto-based Fan Expo HQ, which bought out Denver Pop Culture Con in March. “It’s being presented on a little bit of a smaller scale because our big event will be in July 2022.”

This special edition event will be about 75% of its planned, 2022 showing, when it returns on Halloween weekend, Moyes said.

Helen H. Richardson, The Denver Post

Tiffany Nemer shows off her Wonder Woman outfit inspired by the Lynda Carter Wonder Woman from 1975 during the 6th annual Denver Comic Con 2017 at the Convention Center on July 2, 2017 in Denver.

While producers of Denver’s former pop-culture con never struggled for impressive guests, the TV and movie celebrities this year feel bigger: William Shatner (a veteran of the event); Mary McDonnell and Edward James Olmos (“Battlestar Galactica”); Giancarlo Esposito (“The Mandalorian,” “Breaking Bad”); Michael Rooker (“The Walking Dead,” “Guardians of the Galaxy”); Ray Fisher (“Justice League”); Zachary Quinto (J.J. Abrams’ “Star Trek”); Jon Lovitz (“Saturday Night Live”); Aimee Garcia (“Lucifer”); Katie Cassidy (“Arrow”) and many more.

“Are you done announcing guests?” wrote Peter Winstead on the event’s Facebook page. “Because there (are) already plenty I’m excited to meet.”

Of course, “celebrity” is defined variously in the pop-culture world, so here the term also includes authors, comics artists, voice actors and filmmakers. One of the biggest commercial aspects of the con — or “shopping madness,” as organizers dubbed it — will take over 400,000 square feet of space with vendors and exhibitors galore, while panels, seminars and workshops fill in slots outside the main attractions.

Pop Culture Classroom also will return with family-friendly events and educational programming, Moyes said, and there’s a new emphasis on cosplay this year with “red carpet” and other Instagram-friendly features.

With an average total attendance of 100,000 people over its three-day weekends, Denver’s event was attractive to Fan Expo HQ for numerous reasons, Moyes said.

“The Denver show has been a top 10 event on the circuit within the pop-culture convention universe for a number of years now, so having that legacy within the market and industry is very important,” Moyes said. “When we come into a market, we look at whether it can support our show but also other events.”

 

Kaija Harris dressed as Poison Ivy ...

Seth McConnell, Special to the Denver Post

Kaija Harris dressed as Poison Ivy poses for a portrait during Denver Pop Culture Con at the Colorado Convention Center on June 1, 2019 in Denver.

Fans would be forgiven for losing track of the event’s myriad changes. Founded in 2012 as Denver Comic Con by the nonprofit Pop Culture Classroom (then Comic Book Classroom), the event quickly became the region’s biggest gathering for fans of comic books, speculative fiction, genre films, tabletop gaming and cosplay. It also was its nonprofit producer’s biggest annual fundraiser, which also made it vulnerable to attempted buyouts from larger, commercial companies.

In 2018, producers were forced to change the name of the event to Denver Pop Culture Con after San Diego’s Comic-Con International brought the legal smackdown to any convention using the “comic con” moniker.

“So we are absolutely committed to comic-book culture, and we’re not backing away from that at all,” former executive director Sam Fuqua told The Denver Post at the time, claiming the name-change was already under discussion. “We just want our name to represent better all the things that happen here.”

After a successful 2019 event, Denver Pop Culture Con in January 2020 announced guests for its summer convention, but was swiftly forced to postpone and ultimately cancel last year’s showing due to the coronavirus pandemic. In March, organizers announced they had sold their business to Fan Expo HQ.

The Toronto-based company runs events across North America and bills itself as the world’s largest producer of fan-event. A month or so after acquiring the Denver convention, the company bought out a half-dozen of its rival Wizard World’s largest shows, including events in Chicago, Philadelphia and New Orleans. The pace of the consolidation is breathtaking for an industry that has gone mainstream over the last decade and a half.

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JKSSB Driving Test notice for various posts

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JKSSB Driving Test notice for various posts

JKSSB Driving Test notice for various posts

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Also Read : JKSSB Junior Statistical Assistant Final Selection list PDF

Also Read : JKSSB Releases Selection Lists for Various Posts, Check here

JKSSB Driving Test notice for various posts

The post JKSSB Driving Test notice for various posts appeared first on JK Breaking News.

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Ex-White House press secretary Jen Psaki hired by MSNBC

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Ex-White House press secretary Jen Psaki hired by MSNBC

By MARK KENNEDY

NEW YORK (AP) — Former White House press secretary Jen Psaki has officially landed at MSNBC, where she is expected to make appearances on the network’s cable and streaming programs as well as host a new original show.

The program, set to debut in the first quarter of 2023, will “bring together her unique perspective from behind the podium and her deep experience in the highest levels of government and presidential politics,” the network said in a statement Tuesday.

Psaki will also appear on NBC and during MSNBC’s primetime special election programming throughout the midterms and 2024 presidential election.

Psaki most recently served as White House spokesperson for the first 16 months of the Biden administration. She previously served as White House communications director under former President Barack Obama and as the spokeswoman for the Department of State.

“Her extensive experience in government and on the campaign trail and perspective as a White House and Washington insider is the type of analysis that sets MSNBC apart,” MSNBC President Rashida Jones said in a statement. “She’s a familiar face and trusted authority to MSNBC viewers, and we look forward to her insight during this consequential election season.”

At MSNBC, on-air personalities are mostly sympathetic to Biden and the Democrats. During Psaki’s White House tenure, Democrats saw her as a champion of their causes, while conservatives found her combative and standoffish.

MSNBC has also hired Symone Sanders, former chief spokeswoman for Vice President Kamala Harris. NBC News has taken pains to draw distinctions between its journalists and MSNBC, which has beefed up its opinion programming.

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Ukraine: 200 bodies found in basement in Mariupol’s ruins

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Ukraine: 200 bodies found in basement in Mariupol’s ruins

By ELENA BECATOROS, OLEKSANDR STASHEVSKYI and RICARDO MAZALAN

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Workers digging through the rubble of an apartment building in Mariupol found 200 bodies in the basement, Ukrainian authorities said Tuesday, as more horrors come to light in the ruined city that has seen some of the worst suffering of the 3-month-old war.

The bodies were decomposing and the stench hung over the neighborhood, said Petro Andryushchenko, an adviser to the mayor. He did not when they were discovered, but the sheer number of victims makes it one of the deadliest known attacks of the war.

Heavy fighting, meanwhile, continued in the Donbas, the eastern industrial region that Moscow’s forces are intent on seizing. Russian troops intensified their efforts to encircle and capture Sievierodonetsk and neighboring cities.

Mariupol was relentlessly pounded during a nearly three-month siege that ended last week after some 2,500 Ukrainian fighters abandoned a steel plant where they had made their stand. Russian forces already held the rest of the city, where an estimated 100,000 people remain out a prewar population of 450,000, many of them trapped during the siege with little food, water, heat or electricity.

At least 21,000 people were killed in the siege, according to Ukrainian authorities, who have accused Russia of trying to cover up the horrors by bringing in mobile cremation equipment and by burying the dead in mass graves.

During the assault on Mariupol, Russian airstrikes hit a maternity hospital and a theater where civilians were taking shelter. An Associated Press investigation found that close to 600 people died in the theater attack, double the figure estimated by Ukrainian authorities.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy accused the Russians of waging “total war” and seeking to inflict as much death and destruction as possible on his country.

“Indeed, there has not been such a war on the European continent for 77 years,” Zelensky said, referring to end of World War II.

Moscow-backed separatists have fought Ukrainian forces in the Donbas for eight years and hold large swaths of territory. Sievierodonetsk and neighboring cities are the only part of the Donbas’ Luhansk region still under Ukrainian government control.

Russian forces have achieved “some localized successes” despite strong Ukrainian resistance along dug-in positions, British military authorities said.

Moscow’s troops also took over the town of Svitlodarsk and raised the Russian flag there, Ukrainian media reported. Svitlodarsk is about 50 kilometers (31 miles) southeast of the strategically important city of Kramatorsk.

Two top Russian officials appeared to acknowledge that Moscow’s advance has been slower than expected, though they vowed the offensive would achieve its goals.

Nikolai Patrushev, secretary of Russia’s Security Council. said the Russian government “is not chasing deadlines.” And Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu told a meeting of a Russia-led security alliance of former Soviet states that Moscow is deliberately slowing down its offensive to allow residents of encircled cities to evacuate — though forces have repeatedly hit civilian targets.

As Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, recovers from weeks of weeks of relentless bombardment, residents formed long lines to receive rations of flour, pasta, sugar and others staples this week. Moscow’s forces withdrew from around Kharkiv earlier this month, pulling back toward the Russian border.

Galina Kolembed, the aid distribution center coordinator, said that more and more people are returning to the city. Kolembed said the center is providing food to over 1,000 people every day, a number that keeps growing.

“Many of them have small kids, and they spend their money on the kids, so they need some support with food,” she said.

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Becatoros reported from Kramatorsk, Ukraine. Associated Press journalists Yuras Karmanau in Lviv, Andrea Rosa in Kharkiv, Danica Kirka in London and other AP staffers around the world contributed.

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