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A new look at Winter Park: Rendezvous Center offers a new-urban lifestyle five minutes from the ski slopes

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A new look at Winter Park: Rendezvous Center offers a new-urban lifestyle five minutes from the ski slopes

If you haven’t been up to see the town of Winter Park lately, you’re going to be surprised at the new look the resort community has in the wake of the pandemic—revealed from two luxurious new-urban flats you can tour today, each of them wrapped by taverns and entertainment.

It’s been 20 years since Denver developer Koelbel and Company launched Rendezvous, an 1,100-acre resort community perched alongside the town, ten minutes from the ski area. While builders have been busy creating new custom homes and cabin-type designs here, Koelbel has worked with city planners to re-envision Winter Park’s downtown presentation into a kind of ‘front porch for the Rockies.’

You’ll see Hideaway Park and amphitheater, where concertgoers were back in force this past summer for music, including for the popular Winter Park Jazz Fest. Koelbel has transformed the town’s old visitor center across from the park into Rendezvous Center—a welcoming center operated by the Chamber of Commerce, along with luxury new-urban townhomes (they’ve all sold at prices from $1.5 to $1.8 million) and those two luxury flats open today, at $1.3 million and $1.4 million.

Meanwhile, Winter Park is seeing the same rush of pandemic-weary buyers that have supercharged the mountain resort markets in Aspen and Steamboat. For that audience, the town has a whole new line of taverns and dining—not just venerable places like Deno’s and Fontenot’s, but Volario’s northern Italian (it’s operated by Devil’s Thumb Ranch); two breweries (Hideaway Park and Big Trout); a wine-tasting adventure; Idlewild Spirits Distillery; and a number of other bistros.

“Visitors are experiencing a resort town where attractions are much more accessible,” says Rendezvous’ Hanna Corbin, who will show you those luxury flats, right across from a shuttle stop that provides free service up to the slopes—or back from the taverns in the wee-small hours (it takes pick-up calls until 2 a.m.).

As Winter Park earns awards for its family-friendly demeanor, Rendezvous’ buyer traffic has been skewing toward those with kids, often comparing the lower prices here to what they see over in Eagle County, or at Steamboat or Breckenridge—areas that aren’t as accessible to Denver as this and where visitors face more traffic congestion.

These two flats, each three-bedroom/three-bath, reach for that exact buyer by way of premium finishes—all-Bosch kitchen appliances, Tharp cabinets, vaulted ceilings, and dedicated indoor parking.  Buyers have an option to join Club Rendezvous, a private après-ski club over at Winter Park resort.

And you’ll hear about single-family cabins and townhomes coming soon; and custom home sites starting in the $300s. Winter Park is 70 minutes from Denver; take I-70 west past Idaho Springs to U.S. 40; then head west 28 miles into the town of Winter Park, to Rendezvous Way.

The news and editorial staffs of The Denver Post had no role in this post’s preparation.

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Jets head coach Robert Saleh calls Brian Kelly ‘a phenomenal man’ after snow shoveling story resurfaces

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Jets head coach Robert Saleh calls Brian Kelly ‘a phenomenal man’ after snow shoveling story resurfaces

Robert Saleh tried to dig out of a snow-shoveling hole he dug himself with his old boss.

The Jets head coach used part of his Wednesday press conference to say that his unflattering story-telling about working for Brian Kelly at the beginning of his career was taken out of context.

“I feel terrible,” Saleh said.

ESPN’s Rob Demovsky wrote a feature on Green Bay Packers head coach Matt LaFleur in 2019, brother of Jets offensive coordinator Mike LaFleur, on how LaFleur rose up from the ranks from lowly college assistant to the NFL.

The article included an anecdote from Saleh — Matt LaFleur and the Jets boss were graduate assistants at Central Michigan under Kelly from 2004-2005 — about the two attending a party at Kelly’s home during the winter break. But they weren’t on the guest list, they were there to work.

“We shoveled the snow and parked all the cars,” Saleh said in the ESPN article. “Then, at the end of the night, we had to go get the cars again.”

That night caused some self-reflection for the two and Saleh told Matt later that night, “that when we’re in that position, we’re never going to treat people the way we got treated,” according to the story.

When former Notre Dame head coach Kelly became LSU’s head coach on Monday, the quote popped back up and Kelly’s character took some heat.

Saleh believes the quote was taken out of context and said the story was meant to be funny and explain the trials that came with being a graduate assistant.

“Part of that article was to tell a funny story of Matt and I as GAs. Part of being a GA … every single coach in this profession, there’s a rite of passage whether you’re a GA or a QC [Quality Control]. And that was a funny story.”

There is a contradiction from Saleh because in the article he mentioned he wouldn’t treat anybody that way. So how was that taken out of context?

Saleh didn’t answer, other than to talk about what a great guy Kelly is.

“Not an indictment on how Brian treated us. Brian is a phenomenal man. He really is and that was just one of those deals. That was supposed to be a funny story that people took in a negative light,” Saleh said. “Shame on me. I should have worded that better but there’s a reason why Matt went back and worked for him. There’s a reason why I tried to go back and work for him. He’s a really good manager and treats people the right way.”

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Avalanche was 7-1 in Nathan MacKinnon’s absence. “Excited to try and help keep this thing rolling,” he said pregame from Toronto.

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Avalanche was 7-1 in Nathan MacKinnon’s absence. “Excited to try and help keep this thing rolling,” he said pregame from Toronto.

TORONTO — After the morning skate at Scotiabank Arena on Wednesday, Avalanche coach Jared Bednar confirmed top-line center Nathan MacKinnon will return to the lineup against the Toronto Maple Leafs tonight to begin a five-game trip.

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Sheriff: Boy’s parents called to Oxford High before violence

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Oxford High School shooting: Fourth student dies

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE

OXFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — A 15-year-old boy was charged Wednesday with murder, terrorism and other crimes for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured others at a Michigan high school.

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald did not reveal a possible motive for Tuesday’s violence at Oxford High School and declined to comment when pressed about whether she believed the victims were specifically targeted. But she said the shooting was premediated, based in part on a “mountain of digital evidence” collected by police.

Sheriff Mike Bouchard later told reporters that the boy’s parents had been summoned to the school before the violence. Bouchard wouldn’t discuss details of the behavior school officials were concerned about.

“There is nothing that he could have faced that would warrant senseless, absolutely brutal violence on other kids,” he said.

Ethan Crumbley is accused of firing a semi-automatic handgun in a school hallway, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit. At least seven other people were injured.

Crumbley was charged as an adult with murder, attempted murder and terrorism causing death. It wasn’t immediately known if he had an attorney who could comment.

“This was not just an impulsive act,” McDonald said.

The shooting should be a wakeup call for new gun laws in a country that has become “desensitized to school shootings,” McDonald told reporters.

“We have to do better,” McDonald said without offering specific changes. “How many times does this have to happen? How many times?”

The charges were announced a few hours after investigators reported that a fourth student had died.

“What about all the children who ran, screaming, hiding under desks? … Those are victims, too, and so are their families and so is the community. The charge of terrorism reflects that,” the prosecutor said.

Deputies rushed to the school around lunchtime Tuesday and arrested Crumbley in a hallway within minutes of the shooting. His father bought the 9 mm Sig Sauer gun last week, according to the Oakland County sheriff.

McDonald strongly suggested that more charges will be filed.

“We are considering charges against both parents and we will be making a decision swiftly,” she said.

“Owning a gun means securing it properly and locking it and keeping the ammunition separate,” she said.

The four students who were killed were identified as 16-year-old Tate Myre, 14-year-old Hana St. Juliana, 17-year-old Madisyn Baldwin and 17-year-old Justin Shilling.

After the attack, authorities learned of social media posts about threats of a shooting at the roughly 1,700-student school. The sheriff stressed how crucial it is for such tips to be sent to authorities, while also cautioning against spreading social media rumors before a full investigation.

Undersheriff Mike McCabe downplayed the significance of a situation in early November when a deer’s head was thrown off the school roof, which he said was “absolutely unrelated” to the shooting. The incident prompted school administrators to post two letters to parents on the school’s website, saying they were responding to rumors of a threat against the school but had found none.

Isabel Flores, a 15-year-old ninth grader, told Detroit television station WJBK that she and other students heard gunshots and saw another student bleeding from the face. They then ran from the area through the rear of the school, she said.

A concerned parent, Robin Redding, said her son, 12th-grader Treshan Bryant, stayed home Tuesday after hearing threats of a possible shooting.

“This couldn’t be just random,” she said.

Bryant said he had heard vague threats “for a long time now” about plans for a shooting.

At a vigil Tuesday night at LakePoint Community Church, Leeann Dersa choked back tears as she hugged friends and neighbors. Dersa has lived nearly all of her 73 years in Oxford. Her grandchildren attended the high school.

“Scared us all something terrible. It’s awful,” Dersa said of the shooting.

Pastor Jesse Holt said news of the shooting flooded in to him and his wife, including texts from some of the 20 to 25 students who are among the 400-member congregation.

“Some were very scared, hiding under their desks and texting us, ‘We’re safe, we’re OK. We heard gunshots, but we’re OK.’ They were trying to calm us, at least that’s how it felt,” he said.

___

Associated Press journalists Ryan Kryska, Mike Householder and David Aguilar in Oxford Township, Michigan; Kathleen Foody in Chicago; and Josh Boak in Rosemount, Minnesota, contributed to this report. AP researcher Rhonda Shafner in New York also contributed.

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