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‘I’m Satan’s son,’ St. Louis County Prosecutor convicts man of rape, assault

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Man sentenced to 40 years for firing at Illinois state trooper

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – A 31-year-old man has been convicted of raping and assaulting a woman at gunpoint for several hours last year.

Christopher Lamar Russell was convicted of first-degree rape, two counts of first-degree sodomy, four counts of domestic assault, three counts of armed criminal action, and first-degree burglary.

In a press release from the St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, Russell broke into the victim’s home in Lemay, forced her to cut off her hair, and sodomize herself with a screwdriver at gunpoint Aug. 19, 2020.

Russell and the victim were in a previous relationship and he “flipped out” after learning the victim was dating another man.

A jail call was played to the jury between Russell and the victim where he said, “I’m Satan’s son – I’ve got demons inside me,” according to the press release.

Those who testified in court for the state were the victim, the police officer who the victim spoke to after the assault, the investigating domestic violence detective, the crime scene detective, the nurse who examined the victim, as well as the paramedic who took her to the hospital, two DNA analysts, and the victim’s cousin who found a shell casing at the crime scene days after the incident.

The defendant also testified, as well as his brother, and his brother’s girlfriend, who provided an alibi for the defendant that the jury rejected, according to the press release.

The St. Louis County Police Department investigated the incident. The U.S. Marshals Service apprehended Russell in Dallas, Texas, a month after he fled St. Louis.

“As the victim testified, all domestic violence is bad but these acts of torture were inhumane,” St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell said in the press release.

“Thanks to this courageous victim, the detectives, our trial team, and this jury, Mr. Russell will be held responsible for his inhumanity.”

The sentencing was set for Dec. 29.

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Massive, wind-driven blaze levels buildings on Salisbury Beach

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Massive, wind-driven blaze levels buildings on Salisbury Beach

SALISBURY — Massive flames engulfed a motel and at least two other buildings early Monday on Salisbury Beach, destroying the structures along the popular summer beachfront.

The fire at Michael’s Oceanfront Motel in Salisbury was called in just before 2 a.m., news outlets reported. The fire spread to at least two other buildings described as residential.

Firefighters eventually struck 9 alarms on the massive blaze, calling in cres from Hampton, New Hampshire, and Ipswich, Mass,, among others, to pitch in.

Videos and photos from the scene showed large flames burning multiple structures in the beach town on the tightly packed beachfront.

It was unclear whether anyone was hurt. Salisbury Police said on Twitter that the city’s Emergency Management and the American Red Cross had set up a community room at the police department for people displaced by the fire.

The Red Cross of Massachusetts said it was already assisting at least 2 people displaced by the fire.

John McGuirk told WCVB-TV he woke up to an officer banging on his door telling him to get out.

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Bill Belichick: Patriots improved in 2021, but ‘have a long way to go’

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Bill Belichick: Patriots improved in 2021, but ‘have a long way to go’

It’s a staple phrase for Bill Belichick during the regular season, but it’s never rang more true than it did Monday morning, roughly 36 hours after the Patriots’ latest season ended.

“We certainly made improvement from where we were last year, but we have a long way to go,” Belichick told WEEI’s The Greg Hill Show.

The Pats finished 10-8 after Saturday’s 47-17 Wild Card loss at Buffalo. That record marked a three-win jump from the previous season, improvement powered by the largest free-agent spending spree in NFL history and better quarterback play. Rookie quarterback Mac Jones completed 67.6% of his passes for 3,801 yards, 22 touchdowns and 13 interceptions a year after Cam Newton tossed eight touchdowns to a dozen picks.

The Patriots’ regular-season point differential also swung from minus-27 in 2020 to plus-159 this season, the largest improvement in the league. They finished as the NFL’s fourth-best team by Football Outsiders’ opponent-and-situation-adjusted efficiency metric, DVOA. Though, the Pats did go 1-5 against their top division rivals, Buffalo and Miami.

Since Saturday’s blowout, Belichick said his focus has been on preparing for Monday, when players will clean out their lockers and sit for exit interviews.

“A day like (Sunday) is a day where I needed a full day, and even more, before the players come in this afternoon to prepare for the things that directly affect these players and this team,” he said.

Belichick added he doesn’t know if or when certain members of his coaching or scouting staff will depart for other organizations. Inside linebackers coach Jerod Mayo will reportedly interview for head-coaching vacancies in Houston and Denver. Eliot Wolf, a senior consultant in the team’s personnel department, has also been requested to interview for the Bears’ general manager position.

As for Belichick, he reiterated his commitment to coaching in 2022.

“I enjoy the job. It’s challenging, but I enjoy all aspects of it,” he said. “Robert and Jonathan (Kraft) have been very supportive and they’ve given me great opportunity to try and do the things we need to do to have a good team.”

Belichick also dismissed any notion he’s taking his job “year to year.”

“Nobody ever said it was year to year or something else. I never said that.”

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On MLK Day, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen says US economy is unfair to Black people

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Atlanta church service will celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.

ATLANTA (AP) — The U.S. economy “has never worked fairly for Black Americans — or, really, for any American of color,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a speech delivered Monday, one of many by national leaders acknowledging unmet needs for racial equality on Martin Luther King Day.

Major events for the holiday also included the annual Martin Luther King Jr. service at the slain civil rights leader’s Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, whose senior pastor, U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock, was hosting Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and other politicians.

Monday would have been the 93rd birthday of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who was just 39 when he was assassinated in 1968 while helping sanitation workers strike for better pay and workplace safety in Memphis, Tennessee.

King, who delivered his historic “I Have a Dream” speech while leading the 1963 March on Washington and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, remains one of the world’s most beloved figures. He considered racial equality inseparable from alleviating poverty and stopping war. His insistence on nonviolent protest continues to influence activists pushing for civil rights and social change.

Yellen referred to King’s famous speech in remarks she recorded for delivery at the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network breakfast in Washington, noting the financial metaphor he used when describing the founding fathers’ promises of equality.

King said on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that “America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned.” He called it ”a bad check, a check which has come back marked insufficient funds. But we refuse to believe the bank of justice is bankrupt!”

“It is compelling rhetoric, but I also think Dr. King knew it was a more than a metaphor. He knew that economic injustice was bound up in the larger injustice he fought against. From Reconstruction, to Jim Crow, to the present day, our economy has never worked fairly for Black Americans – or, really, for any American of color,” Yellen said.

She said the administration of President Joe Biden has sought to ensure that no economic institution fails to work for people of color. Equity was built into the American Rescue Plan so that communities of color would get pandemic relief, and Treasury is injecting $9 billion into Community Development Financial Institutions and Minority Depository Institutions traditionally poorly served by the financial sector.

“There is still much more work Treasury needs to do to narrow the racial wealth divide,” she said.

The King Center said the 10 a.m. service, featuring a keynote by the Rev. Michael Bruce Curry, presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church, would be broadcast live on Atlanta’s Fox TV affiliate and on Facebook, YouTube and thekingcenter.org. Atlanta’s planned events also included a march, a rally and a voter registration drive by the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda and Youth Service America.

“On this King Holiday, I call us up to shift our priorities to reflect a commitment to true peace and an awareness of our interconnectedness, interdependence, and interrelatedness,” King Center CEO Bernice King said in a statement. “This will lead us to a greater understanding of our responsibilities to and for each other, which is crucial for learning to live together, achieving ‘true peace,’ and creating the Beloved Community.”

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