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What Is A Holistic Practitioner?

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Holistic Practitioners are holistic healing professionals with a gift in one or more areas of healing. From bodyworkers to homeopaths to hypnotherapists, the term holistic practitioner has become one that is often challenging to describe or understand. Hopefully this article will provide you with some clarity on what a holistic practitioner is and how to find one that meets your individual needs.

Saying holistic practitioner is similar to saying doctor. While there are general practitioners that cross along many paths, most specialize in one or more holistic methods or areas. The main areas of specialization are body-centered therapists, energy-centered therapists, mind-centered therapists, soul and spirit-centered therapists, emotional release therapists, and coaches/counselors. All of these therapists strive to bring a greater quality of life to their clients. That may occur through inner balance, self-empowerment, physical ease, or even emotional confidence.

One thing to realize is that many holistic practitioners work in many areas. In fact, it is usually challenging to limit a practitioner to one area. For example, a hypnotherapist may also be a chakra therapist, a bodyworker could also be a spiritual counselor, etc. Also, since the mind-body-soul connection is just that, connected, wherever you begin, be it in energy work, bodywork, or even the mind, you will find that all of you is affected by the work.

Use this article as a guide to explore the realms of possibilities, rather than limiting your choices to an area.

Body-centered Therapists

Samples of body-centered therapists are bodyworkers, massage therapists, pilates and yoga therapists, rolfing professionals(often termed rolfers), acupressure therapists, myofascial release and sports massage therapists, reflexologists, thai massage therapists, watsu practitioners, feldenkrais and alexander method professionals, and movement therapists (this list is provided to offer an overview as there are at least 50 types of body-centered therapists).

While each body-centered therapist has their own way of working with clients, many use a combination of movement, the breath, and physical pressure (from massage to trigger points) to allow the body to release tension. This release of tension then allows the mind to also find a relaxing state. Sometimes the relaxation state is the goal of the sessions, other times, it is the true starting point.

Energy-centered Therapists

Samples of energy-centered therapists are integrative energy workers, reiki practitioners, healing touch practitioners, breathwork therapists, jin shin do and jin shin jytsu therapists, matrix therapists, applied kinesiologists, orgone therapists, polarity workers, cranial sacral workers, qigong and tai chi masters. Acupuncturists and homeopathy practitioners could also be deemed energy workers.

Energy workers often work with energetic ‘maps’ of the body. They look at where the energy is stuck, depleted or overtaxed in the body and work with the individual to bring a level of balance to the body’s energetic system. This balance also affects the mind and the overall body, enhancing ones state of being on many levels.

Mind-centered Therapists

Samples of mind-centered therapists are hypnotherapists, neuro-linguistic programming practitioners (NLP), integrative release therapists(IRT), regression therapists and metaphysicians.

Mind-centered therapists look at the structures of one’s belief systems and how they may be conflicting with and/or not supporting a client’s quality of life. Mind-centered therapists often find the original cause of what the stuck states are and work with the unconscious mind to reframe limiting patterns and beliefs which provide greater resources and confidence for the client to live the life they desire.

Soul and Spirit-centered Therapists

Samples of soul and spirit-centered therapists are shamans, angelic masters, psychic mediums,

intuitive guides and spiritual counselors(who would also fall into the coaching/counseling category).

Soul and spirit-centered therapists work with clients in a variety of ways. A shaman may work with a client using soul retrieval to regain a part of their soul that has been ‘lost’ due to trauma. A psychic may offer an individual information on what will happen on their current path if they don’t make changes. An intuitive may assist a client in talking with a deceased loved one. As with the other categories, there are many ways soul and spirit-centered therapists work with their clients.

Emotional Release Therapists

Samples of emotional release therapists are integrative release therapists, somato-emotional therapists, psych-k therapists and amanae therapists.

Emotional release therapists work with patterns of emotions that are stuck in the body/mind and assist a client in moving through these blocks into greater joy and emotional freedom. Many other therapies, including neuro-linguistic programming, yoga, shamanic work and energy work employ emotional release methodologies.

Holistic Coaches and Counselors

Samples of coaches and counselors are life coaches, empowerment coaches, spiritual and intuitive counselors, holistic psychologists, and nutritional counselors.

Coaches and counselors assist clients in designing and manifesting the life, career, business and health situations that they truly desire. A holistic coach or counselor often works with a client 1-4x per month setting goals, opening belief systems and partnering with the client to provide the support they need to move forward in their lives.

As you can see, the term holistic practitioner can be used to mean a holistic profession trained in any number of areas. Usually, a holistic practitioner will list their areas of expertise in any of their advertising to assist you in determining if they would be a fit for your unique situation.

For information on locating a holistic practitioner, please see my article on ‘Choosing a Holistic Practitioner’ or see Holistic Hometown (www.HolisticHometown.com) for holistic resources in your hometown, and beyond.

Blessings on your journey.

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Greyhound Racing: What The Coloured Jackets Mean

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The typical greyhound race in the UK consists of six dogs. Each dog is identified by the coloured jacket it wears for the race. The colour signifies its starting position – in other words the trap number it races from – and helps you to identify the dogs as they are racing. The colours are standard so it helps to become familiar with them for your night at the greyhounds. Let’s take a run through them.

The red jacked is always worn by the dog starting from trap one. This is the starting position closest to the inside rail. Such animals generally have a preference for running along the inside of the track and are known to race goers as “railers.” A railer typically requires a good burst of early speed to hold its position in to the first corner and not get baulked by the opposition.

The blue jacket is always worn by the dog starting from trap two. This trap is also generally favoured by railers with such dogs seeking to get over to the rail in front of the greyhound in trap one.

The white jacket is always worn by the animal starting from trap three and the black jacket is always worn by the greyhound staring from trip four. Such starting positions are generally favoured by greyhounds who have a natural preference for running along the middle of the track as signified by the (M) notation next to their name in the race card.

The orange jacket is always worn by the greyhound starting from trap five and the black and white striped jacket by the greyhound starting from trap six. Such staring positions are generally favoured by greyhounds who have a natural preference for running towards the wide outside of the track as signified by the (W) notation next to their name in the race card. A potential advantage of wide running is that the frequent first turn scrimmaging can be avoided.

Trap position does make a difference and should be taken in to account when looking for betting opportunities. A greyhound running out of position can be harmful to its chances though usually for graded races trap preference is taken in to account by the racing manager and a wide runner will not be placed in to an inside trap and vice-versa.

This is to avoid trouble in running. For example if a greyhound which is normally a wide runner was to be placed in trap one its natural instinct would be to seek the outside rail and move right out of the traps. This could cause interference with other dogs in the race.

It can be a fun night out and need not break the bank as entry is not expensive. Many race goers like to enjoy a meal as they watch the racing from the comfort of the restaurant. A few minutes familiarising yourself with the different coloured jackets, the starting position and if your chosen greyhound has a noted preference for trap position can aid your enjoyment when going for a night at the greyhound racing.

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How Do YOU Measure Success

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It was in January of 1962 when Barnsley P. Wentworth III told his father that he wasn’t going to be a doctor: he was going to be a clown. Without hesitating his father replied, “Then you will never amount to anything. Consider yourself a failure.” That was the moment Barnsley P. Wentworth III fell from his father’s grace, changed his name to Juggles, and became a clown. It was his greatest joy. It was his greatest passion. And he never made more than $50 a job.

It was a hot afternoon in July and Juggles was driving back to his hotel after working all day at a county fair, when he took a wrong turn into a trailer park and saw the mailbox covered in balloons – the calling card of a child’s birthday party. He sat there for a moment, looked at his watch, shook his head, sighed, and grinned from ear to ear as he put his rubber nose back on and jumped out of the car. He saw a little red head peeking through the flowered sheet curtain followed by piercing squeals as the door burst open and children rushed at him like excited puppies finding food. He would never forget that sound or the shocked look on the mother’s face as she whispered thank you and started to believe again. Or the sheer adoration on the birthday boy’s face as Juggles signed his cast and he solemnly vowed to never wash his arm again as he hugged Juggles’ striped leg and that moment was branded into his memory as he whispered thank you and started to believe again.

Juggles never stopped being a clown. Day in and day out. It stayed his dream and remained his passion. Even when his hair fell out and he was too weak to honk his nose – even from his bed, when what little fans that were left had to come to him. It was March of 1998 when Juggles died, wearing a big red nose and a contented smile. He never made more than $50 a job.

How do you measure success?

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When Do Interns Have to Be Paid? Revised FLSA Test May Create New Unpaid Internship Opportunities

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Did you know that the Department of Labor recently changed the test used to determine whether interns are employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)? Though mostly overlooked, this development may significantly affect the manner in which employers provide internship opportunities. It may also encourage other employers to start their own internship programs.

In January 2018, the Department of Labor clarified that going forward, a “primary beneficiary” test will be used to determine whether interns are employees of “for profit” employers under the FLSA. Why is this a big deal? The FLSA’s minimum wage and overtime pay requirements generally apply to employees, not interns.

Educators and employers alike agree that individuals can benefit greatly from properly designed unpaid internship programs. Unfortunately, since interns are not entitled to compensation under the FLSA, they may be exploited by employers who use their free labor without providing with an appreciable benefit in education or experience. The DOL began issuing informal guidance to prevent this kind of abuse in the late 1960s.

In 2010, the DOL published a 6-factor test to distinguish between interns that don’t need to be paid under the FLSA and employees that do. One factor in particular proved to be a nearly insurmountable obstacle. “The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern; and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded.”

Since all six factors had to apply, many believed this test was too rigid, including some federal appellate courts. These courts instead opted to apply a “primary beneficiary” test that:

  • focuses on what interns receive in exchange for their work;
  • gives courts the flexibility to examine the economic reality of the intern/employer relationship; and
  • acknowledges the uniqueness of internships in that interns agree to perform work in exchange for educational or vocational benefits.

In January 2018, the DOL essentially adopted this “primary beneficiary” test to eliminate unnecessary confusion and provide increased flexibility to holistically analyze internships on a case-by-case basis. This test includes seven factors to consider when determining whether an intern is actually an employee under the FLSA.

  1. Expectation of Compensation. The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand that there is no expectation of compensation. Any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests that the intern is an employee-and vice versa.
  2. Training. The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to that which would be given in an educational environment, including clinical and other hands-on training provided by educational institutions.
  3. Education. The extent to which the internship is tied to the intern’s formal education program by integrated coursework or the receipt of academic credit.
  4. Academics. The extent to which the internship accommodates the intern’s academic commitments by corresponding to the academic calendar.
  5. Duration. The extent to which the internship’s duration is limited to the period in which the internship provides the intern with beneficial learning.
  6. Displacement. The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than displaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern.
  7. Promise of Employment. The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is conducted without entitlement to a paid job at the conclusion of the internship.

Unlike the rigid six-factor test, the primary beneficiary test is intended to be flexible. No single factor is determinative and additional factors may also be considered on a case-by-case basis when appropriate.

The FLSA’s “internship exclusion” was quite narrow under the old six-factor test. Whether this changes under the new primary beneficiary test remains to be seen. Nevertheless, employers should proceed cautiously when evaluating and determining whether someone can be treated as intern under the FLSA, rather than an employee.

The risk of employment-related claims goes up whenever laws and regulations change. Employment Practices Liability Insurance, which may include limited wage and hour coverage, can protect employers in the event of an inadvertent violation.

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