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Keeler: Tom McMahon? Still here. Teddy Bridgewater? Still Vic Fangio’s QB. The Broncos have turned into the Rockies. Profits over pride.

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Keeler: Tom McMahon? Still here. Teddy Bridgewater? Still Vic Fangio’s QB. The Broncos have turned into the Rockies. Profits over pride.

The Broncos are the new Rockies. Profit, then beer sales, then accountability. Different colors. Same ethos.

To you, Empower Field at Mile High is a community heirloom, a fortress to be cherished and protected. To the Bowlen Trust, it’s a giant ATM.

The next coach, player or executive at UCHealth Training Center who’s held culpable for something, anything, will be the first.

Take special teams coach Tom McMahon. (Take him! Somebody! Please!) Lordy, he’s bad, Vic Fangio. His units are averaging a catastrophe per game. The bye week’s here. You considering a change?

“No, there wouldn’t be,” Fangio replied Monday afternoon. “You know, both Tom and I have to do a better job of coaching special teams and we’ve got to give it to our players and coach them better, so we don’t have those type of plays happen.”

Tacklin’ Teddy Bridgewater has been trending on Twitter for all the wrong reasons, Uncle Vic. Would you consider working Drew Lock into the quarterback mix, to maybe just to see what you’ve got? Or to send a message?

“Teddy,” the coach replied, “is our quarterback moving forward.”

Melvin Gordon’s fumbled it away twice in the past three games. Given how slim your margin for error is on offense and how nasty rookie Javonte Williams looks in limited work, would you consider changing the rotation at tailback?

“I have great confidence in Melvin,” Fangio replied. “Melvin’s one of the top backs in this league. He has fumbled it twice in the last three weeks, as you mentioned. That’s something he has to put extra emphasis on, to protect the ball moving forward.”

You’re one pulled ligament away from holding community tryouts at inside linebacker, coach. Any thought to changing up the scheme to try to play to whatever strengths can still walk?

“No,” Fangio replied. “We just have to coach the guys that we have playing for us. We have got to coach them better. That starts with coaching. And we have to do a better job of that.”

We just need to keep doing what we’ve been doing, but better.

Just when we thought we were finally rid of former Rockies general manager Jeff Bridich, that ghost comes sauntering back, haunting our autumns. Can Trevor Story play quarterback?

“It’s one game at a time and we’ve got to take it one day at a time in our preparation,” Fangio continued. “We have to try and fix all of our correctable errors and we have to do a better job of coaching these guys. We’ve got to do a better job of calling the game — me, defensively, (and offensive coordinator) Pat (Shurmur) and (QB coach) Mike (Shula), offensively. We all have to be better.”

And somewhere, Nolan Arenado just shakes his head and laughs.

For a guy who talked so much about inches when he was hired, the little details that make the difference between a 7-10 season and a 10-7 one, Fangio’s continued public support for McMahon, whom he inherited from the Vance Joseph regime, becomes more disconcerting by the week.

After 10 games, FootballOutsiders.com’s DVOA metric ranks McMahon’s units at No. 29 among NFL squads in terms of “how many points, compared to league average, each team receives from the five elements of special teams.”

By that same metric, the Broncos’ special teams groups rated 24th last fall. And 24th in 2019. But, hey, that was up from No. 31, next to last, in 2018. And those kind of numbers have happened with the presence of an All-World kicker such as Brandon McManus. And even after the likes of Mike Boone, Mike Ford and Jonas Griffith were added to try and tie up loose ends.

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Four Stylish Homes from LIV Sotheby’s International Realty that Just Hit the Market

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Four Stylish Homes from LIV Sotheby’s International Realty that Just Hit the Market

The selling season is officially here in Colorado. Buyers and sellers are hitting the ground running this month rather than waiting for the start of spring when the market typically begins heating up. This sooner-than-normal start to the season means there are exciting new listings entering the market every day that are ready to help the lucky buyers than claim them live the life they love in Colorado.

As Colorado’s leading luxury and lifestyle-focused real estate brokerage, LIV Sotheby’s International Realty (LIV SIR) represents some of the most spectacular homes along the Front Range and beyond. Here is a look at some of the most recent luxury listings to enter the market.

Craftsmanship Near the City
Start your next chapter in the classic Denver home located at 675 N. Humboldt St. Listed by LIV SIR broker, Debra Fagan, for $4,200,000, every inch of this home is exquisitely designed to create a luxury city living experience. Offering five bedrooms, seven bathrooms, and ample space for formal and casual entertaining, this Denver residence is a must-have for those looking for a home that can do it all. Originally built in 1908, the house was taken down to the studs before being completely redesigned using the finest finishes and materials. Box beam ceilings, elegant colonnades, custom built-in storage, interior corbels, hand-cuts stair railings, leaded glass windows, mahogany wood floors, Bradbury & Bradbury wall treatments, and more is what you’ll find in this richly designed residence.

Timeless Elegance in Castle Rock
Sophistication and style abound at 918 Dakota Dr., listed by LIV SIR broker, Audrey Will, for $2,950,000. This stunning, spacious home is situated on over an acre of land adjacent to natural, open space in Castle Rock. The moment one enters this five-bedroom, five-bathroom estate, they are greeted by soaring ceilings and an abundance of natural light pouring in from the many oversized windows throughout the home. An entertainer’s dream, this home features incredible spaces for hosting friends and family such as the two-story great room, lower-level recreation room, wet bar, and movie theater. Each room within the home is teeming with luxurious finishes that elevate this already incredible home.

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Think your home value is soaring? Talk to a Missouri farmer

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Think your home value is soaring? Talk to a Missouri farmer

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Fourth-generation corn and soybean farmer Jeff Frank doesn’t feel rich, but simply based on the skyrocketing value of his land in northwest Iowa, it’s an apt way to describe him, even if he laughs at the idea.

He lives in the same nearly century-old house, grows veggies in the family garden and shops at the same grocery store about 15 miles (24 kilometers) down the road. “We live the same way we have all of our lives,” he said.

Still, even if Frank’s life hasn’t changed, the several hundred acres he owns about 80 miles (129 kilometers) northwest of Des Moines have suddenly made him worth millions of dollars.

It may come as a surprise to city dwellers excited by their home values that countless farmers like Frank are actually experiencing a real estate boom that makes residential prices pale in comparison. While median existing-home prices rose by 15.8% in the U.S. last year, farmland values went up about double that rate in places like Iowa.

“I’m definitely surprised by the magnitude,” said Wendong Zhang, an economist at Iowa State University who oversees an annual farmland value survey.

The rising values, especially in the Midwest, are due to high prices being paid for the key commodity crops of corn and soybeans, plentiful harvests in recent years coupled with low-interest rates and optimism the good times will continue.

But they’re a mixed blessing. They’re enriching farmers who already have a lot of land, but making it much harder for small operators or younger farmers starting out to get land unless they happen to inherit it.

Most purchases are by operations that see the value of larger scale, seizing the chance to buy nearby land.

“If you miss this opportunity, you may not get another chance,” Zhang said, describing the current mood.

As for consumers, higher land costs typically don’t affect grocery prices.

Historically, farmland values rise and fall, but in the past couple decades they have mostly risen, and in the past year they have risen a lot — 33% in Frank’s part of the state and 29% throughout Iowa, one of the nation’s top agricultural states. Agricultural prices also have soared elsewhere in the Midwest and have climbed in most other parts of the country, too.

Federal Reserve Banks in Chicago and Kansas City reported double-digit increases in Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska.

In Iowa, average farmland has risen from $7,559 an acre in 2020 to $9,751 an acre in 2021.

Nationally, farmland was up an average of 7% but that doesn’t include the last half of 2021, when prices really took off in many areas.

Farmland prices have even climbed in California despite concerns about persistent drought. In 2021, the average prices of $10,900 an acre was up 9% from 2020.

The land purchases augment an existing national trend of more agricultural production coming from ever-larger farms.

Dan Sumner, an agricultural economist at the University of California-Davis, credits some of the rising value in switching to higher-value crops, such as replacing alfalfa with nut trees.

Overall, though, Sumner said farmers are feeling good about their future.

“It reflects confidence in the economics of agriculture,” he said.

The upswing follows tumultuous years of trade wars, market breakdowns due to the coronavirus pandemic and drought in much of the West.

For individual farmers, the biggest benefit of rising values is that they can borrow money at better rates for annual needs like seed and fertilizer and longer-term investments like tractors and even more land.

The high prices have prompted plenty of people to buy and sell land, leading to a record of $765 million in agricultural land sales last year overseen by Farmers National Company, one of the nation’s largest landowner services companies.

Randy Dickhut, a Farmers National real estate broker in Omaha, Nebraska, said a more typical year would see about $500 million in sales.

“It’s been very busy,” Dickhut said. “It’s certainly easy to sell.”

But Holly Rippon-Butler, who runs a dairy with her parents in upstate New York, called the farmland prices increases “just nuts.”

“The hard reality is, buying land is almost impossible unless you have some preexisting source of generational family wealth,” said Rippon-Butler, who works with the National Young Farmers Coalition, an organization the among other priorities advocates for policy changes and public funding that would enable more people to have access to land.

Given high land prices, Rippon-Butler said beginning farmers she encounters typically work as little as a quarter-acre of land and see 20 acres as a relatively large operation. Many farmers also rent land, and as values rise, so do rental rates.

Frank, the farmer in northwest Iowa, said that even though he’s technically wealthier now, it hard for him to expand his holdings as he prepares to pass along the property to the next generation.

“I have a son who farms with me and of course he’d like to expand but buying farmland right now is a big undertaking,” he said. “Even for a small farm you’re talking about millions of dollars.”

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Ravens sign FB/TE Ben Mason, a 2021 draft pick, to reserve/future deal

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Ravens sign FB/TE Ben Mason, a 2021 draft pick, to reserve/future deal

Almost five months after leaving Baltimore, Ben Mason is a Raven again. The fullback-tight end, a fifth-round pick of the Ravens last year who bounced around in his rookie season, joined the team’s 90-man offseason roster Friday after signing a reserve/future deal.

Mason, the No. 184 overall pick, was the final selection of the Ravens’ 2021 draft class. But the Michigan product struggled to make an impact in the preseason, and he was waived at the end of training camp. Rather than sign with the Ravens’ practice squad, Mason headed to New England’s.

He never appeared in a game for the Patriots, who released him in November. Mason joined the Chicago Bears’ practice squad in December but was not signed to a reserve/future deal at the end of the season.

The 6-foot-3, 256-pound Mason is a potential replacement for Pro Bowl fullback Patrick Ricard, a pending free agent. Under offensive coordinator Greg Roman, the Ravens have typically used heavier personnel packages that showcase versatile blockers.

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