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Suffering in silence: Why you can’t ignore your mental health and well-being

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Suffering in silence: Why you can’t ignore your mental health and well-being

ST. LOUIS – Health experts say the harsh reality is more than half of adults who experience mental illness will not seek treatment and many think they can snap out of it on their own. However, doctors say it’s an illness that can and should be treated.

That applies to the two people you are about to meet. They’ve battled with their own depression and are on a mission to inspire others to seek help and push forward.

Koran Bolden, a St. Louis native, has garnered numerous awards and media recognition as a motivational speaker and author. Bolden, 38, launched his first business at the age of 12 and solidified his first multi-million-dollar contract offer by the age of 21.

However, Bolden’s life came to a screeching halt last year. He realized the people around him were counting on him to be strong, but he was empty.

“It was really hard for me because everyone was looking at Koran Bolden, the brand, who shows up and the helper of all things in the community and in schools. He is that big hero. It was even harder for me to come out. It left me suffering in silence,” he said. “I would rather tell my story, be truly authentic of who I am, and deal with people who understand what I’m going through than to live a lie.”

Bolden turned his stumbling blocks into stepping stones.

“After losing my brother to gun violence while in the same month losing my uncle to cancer, I ended up having a family shattered in pieces and not really knowing how to pick up those pieces,” he said.

Bolden says he put his pride aside and has since gone to nearly two dozen therapy sessions. He says he’s overcome his trauma and celebrated his achievement this past October when the Cardinals asked him to throw out a ceremonial first pitch at a game.

“I really think it’s time to step up in the community and be able to really do something about this, cause there is so many people that need help,” he said.

Now we introduce you to Sabrina McField, a former choreographer and dancer for musician R. Kelly.

McField was devasted as she watched her former boss fall from grace and ultimately be sentenced to prison for sex crimes. McField wrote the book “The Dance in My Shoes” where she channeled her own emotional strife.

“I went on this journey writing this book and it forced a lot of conversation about my mother and father. I finished this book in 2020. For 15 years, I did not know what to say or how to communicate or who to talk to about mental health,” she said.

McField son’s father took his own life and, months later, COVID closed her salon business.

McField confronted her crisis head-on.

“Yes, people have breaking points; you have to get to know your body. Your body tells you, that’s one thing I learned on this journey. your body tells you,” she said. “Save yourself. No one is coming to save you, no one came to save me. I’m glad to save myself.”

Dr. Jessi Gold, a Washington University psychiatrist at Barnes Jewish Hospital, says there are warning signs.

“Too much sleep or too little sleep and any change in appetite. People start to notice those warning signs and your loss of interest in stuff,” she said. “Also, on the serious note, hopeless thoughts if not wanting to wake up, or wanting to hurt yourself or end your life, that would be a reason you should be concerned and want to get help.”

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McDonald’s employee shot in north St. Louis County Wednesday afternoon

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McDonald’s employee shot in north St. Louis County Wednesday afternoon

COOL VALLEY, Mo. – A woman working at a McDonald’s in north St. Louis County was shot Wednesday afternoon.

Col. Mark Hall, the Normandy police chief, said the employee was shot in her upper body by another woman while outside the fast-food place located in the 1700 block of S. Florissant Road.

The employee’s condition is unknown at this time but is expected to survive, according to the police chief.

The investigation is ongoing. This is a developing story and it will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Red Bridge Estate outside of Durango hits market for $12.5M

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Red Bridge Estate outside of Durango hits market for $12.5M

Sitting on 40 acres just 25 minutes outside of Durango, a Western-style ranch with modern finishes has been listed for $12.5 million.

Red Bridge Estate, at 10506 County Road 250 in the Animas River Valley, features an 8,251-square-foot main residence with an oversized garage, a court for tennis and pickleball, and a 3,385-square-foot equestrian barn with four stalls and a living quarters.

The ranch is owned by Red Bridge Ranch LLC, managed by Hugh and Donna Scott, according to public records. A Luxe Interiors + Design article previously described the owners as “a Bay Area couple who built their vacation home near the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in Colorado’s southwest corner.”

Courtesy of Hall and Hall Partners

The ranch sits on 40 acres about 25 minutes outside of Durango.

“It was very un-Aspen and un-Vail,” the home’s interior designer Julie Massucco Kleiner told Luxe. “The wife was born and raised in the Midwest and wanted to find a less glamorous vacation home that would speak to her sensibilities.”

The current owners purchased the property in 2016 for $3 million, according to La Plata County records, and built the home.

Address: 10506 County Road 250, Durango

1642629859 15 Red Bridge Estate outside of Durango hits market for 125M

Courtesy of Hall and Hall Partners

The property has a multi-sport court for pickleball, tennis and basketball.

Listing price: $12.5 million

Stats: Coon Creek borders the property and runs year-round. The ranch has water rights.

The finer things: Guests enter the ranch over a red bridge, hence the name, and down a tree-lined drive opening to the estate.

1642629859 377 Red Bridge Estate outside of Durango hits market for 125M

Courtesy of Hall and Hall Partners

There are vaulted ceilings throughout the home up to 27 feet tall.

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Zillow Gone Wild features $3.4M Missouri tourist attraction Jacob’s Cave

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Zillow Gone Wild features $3.4M Missouri tourist attraction Jacob’s Cave

VERSAILLES, Mo. – Zillow Gone Wild showcases a historical cave and tourist destination in central Missouri that is sure to attract avid spelunkers.

For 90 years, people have congregated just north of Lake of the Ozarks to walk through a mile-long cave system known as Jacob’s Cave.

The cave—believed to have been used by indigenous peoples before European settlement, and by troops during the American Civil War—was rediscovered in 1875 by lead and tiff miner Jacob Craycraft.

According to the historiography on JacobsCave.com, Craycraft moved to Missouri as a young boy with his father and brother from Kentucky.

As the story goes, Craycraft, now an adult, was mining one August day with two other men and a young boy. During a lunch break, they took turns throwing rocks toward what they believed to be a shallow hole. One of the larger rocks went in the hole but made an odd sound upon landing. Craycraft and the men dug around the hole and discovered an entrance to the massive cave system.

Craycraft would explore part of the cave the following day and made note of the discovery on the cave walls. “Jacob Craycraft, the man who discovered this cave, 1875 August 9th,” he wrote. Visitors can see the note on the current tour of the cave.

The cave is being sold along with a 4-bed and 2.5-bath residence, as well as the large workshed and gift shop located on the property. The sprawling 223 acres includes a large open space with well-kept dirt roads, which has been used as a gathering place for swap meets for several years.

You can see more pictures of the cave and the property by visiting the Zillow listing.

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