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CU Buffs vs. Washington football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions

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CU Buffs vs. Washington football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions

Washington (4-6) at Colorado (3-7)

1 p.m. Saturday, Folsom Field

TV/Radio: Pac-12/850 AM, 94.1 FM

Line: Colorado +7, 43 over/under

Weather: Partly cloudy, 50 degrees

What to know

Nate Landman, Part I. If anyone deserves a final bow in front of a CU home crowd, it’s senior linebacker Nate Landman, who’s missed the past three games as he recovers from a soft tissue injury. Head coach Karl Dorrell said earlier this week that there’s a chance No. 53 could suit up for Senior Day, in addition to fellow linebacker Guy Thomas, safety Trevor Woods and cornerback Mekhi Blackmon.

Nate Landman, Part II. And if you’re wondering just how much the defense has missed him, consider these numbers: Over the last three games, CU opponents are averaging 43.3 points, 28 first downs, 14.7 rushing first downs and 460 total yards per game. The senior defender is also on track to become the first Buffs defender to ever lead the team in tackles four different times. He’s got a seven-stop lead with two games left. If he plays them.

The Buffs need points … CU is 0-5 under coach Karl Dorrell when scoring fewer than 20 in a game. The Huskies come in giving up just 21.2 per game — and only 18.7 per game to Pac-12 foes on the road. Defense travels, even if the UW offense sometimes misses its charter entirely.

 … and they also need a decent start. Which is certainly possible, given that the Huskies have managed only 11.6 first-half points per game while the Buffs are averaging a lackluster 8.1 themselves. CU is 0-6 under Dorrell while trailing at the half, 7-3 otherwise. The Buffs are 7-1 in the Dorrell Era when leading at the end of the third quarter, and only 0-8 when trailing.

Key Matchups

Jarek Broussard vs. Washington’s front seven. The Buffs are better when they run the ball with purpose. CU is averaging 40.3 carries over its last three games, and it’s not a coincidence that they’re also averaging 28.7 points per game during that stretch, too. Broussard, meanwhile, is coming off back-to-back 100-yards-or-more rushing performances for the first time since Games 3 and 4 of the abbreviated 2020 season. Against a Huskies D that’s giving up 204.8 rushing yards per contest and 4.9 yards per tote, Broussard could be in line for another big day.

CU’s linebackers vs. Washington QB Dylan Morris. Young quarterbacks can be frustrating, as Buffs fans know only too well. The Huskies are 3-1 this season in the four games in which Morris hasn’t thrown an interception, but they’re 1-4 whenever they’ve turned the ball over two times or more. If the Buffs want to start turning heads, they need to start turning some screws.

Predictions

Sean Keeler, sports columnist: CU 18, Washington 17

With the Apple Cup coming up in less than a week, Jimmy Lake’s exit, and the last dance at Folsom for the Buffs seniors, CU should bring a little mojo to the table. But here’s the catch: U-Dub’s defense is strong when it comes to forcing field goal attempts in the red zone. Will the Buffs hit ‘em?

Kyle Fredrickson, sports reporter: Washington 31, CU 28

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Councilwoman insists she didn’t change her position on mandatory mask mandate because she caught COVID

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Councilwoman insists she didn’t change her position on mandatory mask mandate because she caught COVID

CLAYTON, Mo. – A St. Louis County councilwoman wants to clear up any misconception that she changed her position on mandatory mask mandates because she herself caught COVID.

Councilwoman Shalonda Webb once opposed County Executive Sam Page’s attempts to pass a mask mandate in the county. That measure failed. But she recently voted for the mask mandate, which passed. The vote came after Webb contracted COVID.

What made Webb change her mind?

“…I never was against masking. As I mentioned before, it’s always been political hurdles, policies, and procedures that got us back into a corner where we couldn’t just come out and vote, and this was a situation where we didn’t have those hurdles,” she said. “That we could go forth and make a vote. I wish it would have came six months ago.”

Did catching Sars-CoV-2 influence her decision to support a mandatory mask mandate?

“I wouldn’t say it gave me an extra push because I was always concerned about making sure we were masked,” Webb said. “It’s just been a lot of policies and procedures that probably got in the way at certain times but we needed to be masked. What gave me the greater push is how these numbers are astronomically ramping up and it doesn’t seem to be flattening anytime soon.”

Webb and Council Chairwoman Rita Days both previously opposed the mask mandates, joining with the Republicans on the county council to defeat previous attempts to pass a mandate.

But Webb and Days ran into a torrent of opposition from their north St. Louis County constituents, who back mask mandates as a way to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Rita Days said she decided to support the mandates because that’s what her community wanted. Shalonda Webb, who had been vaccinated, said getting COVID herself has been a learning experience.

“It has no respect of no person. We all need to be vaccinated and masked, not that I didn’t know that before, but after going through this bout I told this to my husband, ‘It’s like you’re afraid to be around people,’” she said. “You’re very conscious of who was I exposed to in order to see how I got it. But then I’m like, ‘Let me call everybody that I was exposed to cause I didn’t know I was contagious.’ So it’s definitely a mental hurdle in my opinion, dealing with that and then dealing with the sickness itself.”

The issue isn’t settled yet. Despite the increase in COVID cases and hospitalizations, Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt has gone to court to try to overturn the county’s mask mandate.

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St. Louis region honors MLK’s legacy

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St. Louis region honors MLK’s legacy

ST. LOUIS – From southern Illinois to St. Louis County, the life and legacy civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is being honored.

Festivities began at Fountain Park in St. Louis with the annual MLK Peace Walk. Many will likely stop by the park Monday to admire the lone statue of Dr. King in Missouri.

The Urban League will lead an event on Monday starting at its headquarters. After the event, there will be another large-scale food, toiletries, and PPE distribution event to serve more than 2,000 families.

The MLK 5k Walk returns to Heman Park in University City on Monday morning as well.

There’s a name change for one event – the MLK Motorcade is now the MLK Votercade this year. That celebration will still be held at the Old Courthouse in St. Louis.

While St. Louis Public Schools will be closed, Kirkwood schools will recognize Dr. King with a drive-through event.

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Space heater believed to be source of deadly Ferguson fire

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Space heater believed to be source of deadly Ferguson fire

FERGUSON, Mo. – The Ferguson Fire Department believes a space heater is to blame for a deadly fire on Ruggles Road on Saturday afternoon. An elderly man was rescued but his son did not survive.

Neighbors said the family used a space heater underneath a back deck to keep their dog warm.

“We believe the source of this fire was, in fact, a space heater,” Ferguson Fire Department Assistant Chief Jeremy Corcoran said.

Corcoran said the home was also lacking working smoke detectors.

Firefighters were able to help both men exit the home but the son died later from some inhalation. Neighbors said the elderly father was caring for his son, who had been receiving hospice care.

The rescue comes the same week St. Louis firefighter Benjamin Polson died. He was killed entering a vacant house fire while making sure no one was trapped inside.

“It’s on all of our minds,” Corcoran said.

He said Saturday’s call is a reminder of why firefighters do what they do.

“We will continue to do what we do and serve the people that count on us to protect them,” Corcoran said. “That’s what firefighters do on a day-in, day-out basis.”

He credited Captain Aaron Brockhorst and firefighter Chad Mezzera for saving the elderly man’s life.

“They made quick and decisive actions to find and retrieve both of those gentlemen and get them out of the house,” Corcoran said.

He hopes the public will follow the manufacturer’s instructions if using a space heater. He said to make sure nothing is near them that could catch fire. Avoid using space heaters in areas where a child or pet could knock them over and avoid using extension cords that could overheat.

The family dog survived. The pet was revived by using a specially-designed oxygen mask. The Ferguson Fire Department has been equipped with those masks for approximately 10 years.

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