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Game time: Fast facts, odds, injury report and key info for Miami Dolphins (4-7) vs. Carolina Panthers (5-6)

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Game time: Fast facts, odds, injury report and key info for Miami Dolphins (4-7) vs. Carolina Panthers (5-6)

DOLPHINS (4-7) vs. PANTHERS (5-6)

Kickoff: 1 p.m., Hard Rock Stadium

TV: FOX (Chs: 7 in Miami-Dade/Broward and 29 in Palm Beach); RADIO: WQAM (560 AM), KISS (99.9 FM), WQBA (1140 AM, Spanish)

Coaches: Brian Flores is 19-24 in his third season with Dolphins; Matt Rhule is 5-6 in his first season leading the Panthers.

Series: The Dolphins have a 4-2 edge in the all-time series with the Panthers, Miami’s least-faced opponent in the NFL, but Carolina has won the past two meetings.

Line: The Dolphins are a 2-point underdog; the over/under is 42.

Injuries: Dolphins — Out: TE Adam Shaheen (knee), DB Elijah Campbell (toe/knee), CB Trill Williams (hamstring); Questionable: S Brandon Jones (ankle/elbow); Injured reserve: WR DeVante Parker (shoulder/hamstring), WR Will Fuller (finger), C Michael Deiter (foot/quad), C Greg Mancz (ankle), RB Malcolm Brown (quadriceps), S Jason McCourty (foot), WR Lynn Bowden (hamstring), WR Allen Hurns (wrist), T Larnel Coleman (knee), T Greg Little (undisclosed); Panthers — Doubtful: G John Miller (ankle); Injured reserve: QB Sam Darnold (shoulder), CB Jaycee Horn (foot), C Matt Paradis (knee), OT Cameron Erving (calf) among 11 players on IR.

Noteworthy: The Dolphins put a three-game winning streak on the line in a key contest to see if they can keep clawing closer to .500 and back into the postseason hunt if a few more victories are strung together. …

Panthers quarterback Cam Newton was with the New England Patriots in the preseason before he was cut, making way for Mac Jones to start there. Spending the first half of the season without a home, Newton rejoined the Panthers, whom he spent the first nine seasons of his career with, two weeks ago. …

Newton makes his second start with Carolina after also playing in goal-line packages in his first game back with the Panthers. He lost his start against Washington Football Team, 27-21. When he was with the Patriots last year, the Dolphins split the season series. …

Dolphins quarterback Tua Tagovailoa is coming off a 27-of-33 performance for 273 yards, two touchdowns and an interception in the 24-17 win against the New York Jets last week. …

Dolphins punter Michael Palardy played in 68 games for the Panthers from 2016 to 2020 with 295 punts. The Panthers have South Florida high school connections with wide receiver Robby Anderson (South Plantation), defensive end Brian Burns (American Heritage), guard John Miller (Miami Central), offensive coordinator Joe Brady (Everglades) and cornerbacks coach Evan Cooper (Miami Killian).

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Opinion: For Colorado’s Jewish community, praying in peace means confronting anti-Semitism

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Texas rabbi says he, 2 hostages escaped synagogue standoff

We are deeply grateful that Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker and three congregants at Congregation Beth Israel in Colleyville, Texas were able to escape safely after being taken hostage during last Saturday’s worship services. This attack against a sacred community in the middle of Sabbath services should be shocking to all people who share the bedrock principle that all of us, no matter our religion, should be allowed to pray free from fear.

The trauma caused by the perpetrator of this heinous act extended far beyond the small congregation in Colleyville. It added to the concerns of Jews in Colorado and around the country that such a horrific event could happen in their synagogues. While the hostage-taker’s focus may have been on the release of a convicted terrorist with links to Al Qaeda, he did not choose a library, shopping mall or church to try to leverage his ask; he chose a synagogue. This was an act of antisemitism, plain and clear.

Antisemitism has reached a high-water mark in the United States. Unfortunately, being on edge and hypervigilant is very much a part of the American Jewish experience. We saw it in the aftermath of the rally in Charlottesville in 2017 when white supremacists chanted “Jews shall not replace us” while marching with their tiki torches across the University of Virginia campus; the deadly shootings at synagogues in Pittsburgh in 2018 and Poway in 2019, and the subsequent attacks on Jewish targets in Jersey City, New Jersey and Monsey, New York.

In 2020, 2,024 incidents of assault, harassment and vandalism in the United States were reported to the Anti-Defamation League, the third-highest year for incidents against American Jews since ADL started tracking such data in 1979. In Colorado, there were 60 antisemitic incidents reported in 2020, just one less than the high set in 2019. A 2021 ADL poll found that well over half of Jewish Americans have either experienced or directly witnessed some form of an antisemitic incident in the last five years.

So, when The Denver Post failed last Sunday to give prominent attention to the taking of hostages at gunpoint during worship services in Colleyville, it was painful. The story was relegated to the “Briefs” section on page 13, a section that included a story about the value of superstar Prince’s estate. We recognize that print deadlines may have passed, but steps should have been taken so that this terrible event was not made to appear less relevant than the primary story on page 2 about the “Nasal Ranger,” a machine that detects smells.

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Staff picks for NFL divisional round: Chiefs vs. Bills, Bengals vs. Titans and more

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Staff picks for NFL divisional round: Chiefs vs. Bills, Bengals vs. Titans and more

Baltimore Sun staff writers pick every game of the NFL season. Here’s who they have winning in the divisional round:

Cincinnati Bengals at Tennessee Titans (Saturday, 4:30 p.m.)

Ryan McFadden (177-101 overall, 5-1 last week): Bengals

Mike Preston (176-102 overall, 4-2 last week): Titans

Jonas Shaffer (177-101 overall, 4-2 last week): Bengals

Childs Walker (180-98 overall, 6-0 last week): Titans

San Francisco 49ers at Green Bay Packers (Saturday, 8:15 p.m.)

McFadden: Packers

Preston: Packers

Shaffer: Packers

Walker: Packers

Los Angeles Rams at Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Sunday, 3 p.m.)

McFadden: Buccaneers

Preston: Buccaneers

Shaffer: Rams

Walker: Buccaneers

Buffalo Bills at Kansas City Chiefs (Sunday, 6:30 p.m.)

McFadden: Chiefs

Preston: Bills

Shaffer: Chiefs

Walker: Bills

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Review: George and Martha return in Denver Center revival of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

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Review: George and Martha return in Denver Center revival of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

A revival worth its salt should always bring fresh revelations, even when it’s set in a bygone era. In “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” at the Denver Center, that discovery comes by way of the character George.  He, along with wife Martha, are if not the first couple of battling parlor dramas, one of the most titanic and influential ones.

Those of us indelibly marked by Mike Nichols’ and Edward Lehman’s 1966 film adaptation of Edward Albee’s domestic trauma drama (winner of the Tony for best play in 1963) may feel that Martha was the eye of that hurricane. Elizabeth Taylor portrayed the daughter of a New England college president married to George, a professor of history at the college. Taylor’s then-husband, Richard Burton, played George. He was very fine, but Taylor proved herself a fabulous harridan — shrieking, emoting and, yes, “braying” her way through a very late night of drinking and domestic sparring.

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“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Written by Edward Albee. Directed by Margot Bordelon. Featuring Kelly McAndrew, Jon Hudson Odom, Isabella De Souza Moore and Paul David Story. At the Singleton Theatre in the Helen Bonfils Theater Complex, 1400 Curtis St., through March 6. For tickets and info: denvercenter.org or 303-893-4100.

As this production’s Martha, Kelly McAndrew is delicious fun. But it is Jon Hudson Odom who commands the room — which might be an odd thing to say about a play that remains very much about masculinity and its fragility. While tempting to instead say “masculinity and emasculation,” this production with director Margo Bordelon at the helm refutes that misogynist read. George and Martha give as good as they get and the pair’s vicious, verbal pas de deux buoys and destroys them equally.

The play opens with Martha and George arriving home after a faculty party hosted by her father. It is late and they are tight and already needling each other. Martha famously asks George again and again in what movie did Bette Davis say, “What a dump!” Once the evening gets underway, a different Davis quote, from “All About Eve,” comes to mind: “Fasten your seat belts. It’s going to be a bumpy night.”

Stepping into the lion’s den to round out the play’s quartet are late-late-night guests biology professor Nick (Paul David Story) and his wife, Honey (Isabella De Souza Moore), who are young and new to the college. Sports reporters like to say nothing good comes of pro athletes being out after midnight. Same goes for this erudite bunch. Nick and Honey ring the bell a bit after 2:30 a.m.

Dawn can’t come fast enough, and yet Bordelon paces the three-hour play deftly. When things wind down, they do so with a deep melancholy and wounding truths.

The party crashes in the Denver Center’s production of the Edward Albee classic “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Provided by Adams VisCom)

Drink has made each of the gathered loose with secrets, with deliveries often cruel and snarky. Nick spills the beans about his and Honey’s courtship to George. Martha mentions to Honey that the following day will be her son’s 21st birthday. That there seems to be some confusion about George and Martha’s boy is Albee’s highwire act.

Virginia Woolf, the big bad pun spoofed in the play’s title and the subject of a ditty sung by Martha, didn’t have children. And progeny haunt the night. Do Nick and Honey plan on having kids? What of George and Martha’s son, who’s set to arrive the next day? And what of the lad in George’s unpublished novel?

Small talk hasn’t a chance here. Things get tense in a hurry. If Honey’s head is swimming, it’s not merely because the “slim-hipped” lightweight keeps asking for and drinking snifters of brandy. No, there’s a constant doubling down on the double entendres, by George and Martha to be sure, but also between George and his new colleague. Besides being a wunderkind, Nick was once a boxer, and the gloves never come off. An early scene finds the two men in the living room, George sitting cross-legged and Nick with legs splayed. Martha has been licking her chops at Nick, and his posture speaks a thousand words.

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George (Jon Hudson Odom) and Honey (Isabelle De Souza Moore) watch as Martha (Kelly McAndrew, far right) and Nick (Paul David Story) flirt during “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” at the Denver Center. (Provided by Adams VisCom)

George goes at his blond, blue-eyed colleague on matters of genetics without ever saying the word “eugenics,” though it’s implied. At one point, thinking he can play with the big kids, Nick will ball up his fist. George may seem broken, but as inhabited by Odom, he isn’t. As for Honey, Moore does alternately touching and amusing work as the faculty wife who only gets drunker and more endearing (to us), an unprotected doe caught in oncoming headlights.

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