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Instant Analysis: Miami Dolphins 33, Carolina Panthers 10

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50 Colo. Time dealers, Wells are auto fame inductees

David Furones, Dolphins Writer

This is what the Dolphins look like clicking on all cylinders. Tua Tagovailoa, even without DeVante Parker and Will Fuller, connecting with Jaylen Waddle non-stop. The defense swarming and forcing turnovers. Even special teams is scoring. The momentum is real, and Miami can legitimately reinsert itself into playoff discussion with a few more wins against a favorable upcoming schedule.

Keven Lerner, Assistant Sports Editor

The Dolphins had their most complete effort of the year and they are now 5-7. Tua Tagovailoa played very well and the defense was even better. Wins against the quite-incomplete Giants and Jets would have Miami at .500. Crazy.

Steve Svekis, Assistant Sports Editor

OK … the Dolphins have basically negated the Falcons and Jaguars losses with two wins as a home underdog against the Ravens and Panthers. They are 5-7 and it would be inexcusable for this meteorically rising defense and the truly competent offense to not defeat the visiting Giants and Jets to get to 7-7. Then, they probably would need to sweep the Saints, Titans and Patriots to reach the playoffs. But, more realistic now — and inconceivable four games ago — is a winning season at 9-8. Tua did two big things he hadn’t during this season: didn’t throw a bad interception, and hit Jaylen Waddle in stride deep down the field. Waddle could end up right in the mix for consideration as the best wide receiver in this draft’s loaded wide receiver first round.

This will be updated.

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Denver man dies in snowboarding accident at Aspen Highlands

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Denver man dies in snowboarding accident at Aspen Highlands

ASPEN — A snowboarder who died after crashing into a tree at Colorado’s Aspen Highlands Ski Area has been identified as 42-year-old Trevor Crandall of Denver.

Crandall’s name was released Thursday by the Pitkin County Coroner’s Office, which ruled his death was accidental.

Pitkin County sheriff’s officials have said Crandall was with a friend when he crashed in the Highlands Bowl on Wednesday afternoon. Ski patrollers performed CPR after finding him unconscious, but he was pronounced dead at the scene a short time later.

No one saw the accident, but rescuers determined he had crashed into a tree.

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March for Life, nation’s largest abortion protest, could be last under Roe

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March for Life, nation’s largest abortion protest, could be last under Roe

WASHINGTON — Anti-abortion protesters began to gather Friday in the nation’s capital with spirits high and a sense that the country has reached a pivotal moment that could lead to a sweeping rollback of abortion rights in many states.

The March for Life, for decades an annual protest against abortion, arrives this year as the Supreme Court has indicated it will allow states to impose tighter restrictions on abortion with a ruling in the coming months — and possibly overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling that affirmed the constitutional right to an abortion.

“It doesn’t feel real. There’s so much hope and vibrancy and happiness and joy at this thing,” said Jordan Moorman of Cincinnati. “I really do believe that we’re in a post-Roe generation.”

The rally, held on the anniversary of the Roe decision, is taking place amid a COVID-19 surge that is expected to limit turnout at the National Mall. Some abortion opponents posted on the event’s Facebook page that they will not attend because of COVID-19 vaccine mandates for people going to restaurants and other places in the District of Columbia.

The pandemic has not dampened the optimism of a resurgent anti-abortion movement that sees a new Texas law banning most abortions as a sign of things to come, and who say they are not done fighting for restrictions even if the Supreme Court’s conservative majority rules in their favor later this year.

At least 26 states are in line to further limit abortion access if Roe is weakened or overturned, according to abortion rights groups. In December, the court indicated in a major case that it would uphold a Mississippi ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, and allow states to ban abortion even earlier. The Mississippi case directly challenges Roe.

For months, courts have dealt Texas abortion providers a string of defeats over efforts to block a law that since September has banned abortions once cardiac activity is detected, which is usually around six weeks and before some women know they are pregnant. Another loss for Texas clinics came Thursday, when the Supreme Court refused to speed up the ongoing challenge over the law, which providers say is now likely to stay in effect for the foreseeable future.

“This law is cruel and unconstitutional, and I am deeply disappointed that our judicial system has done very little to stop it,” said Amy Hagstrom Miller, president of Whole Woman’s Health, which operates four abortion clinics in Texas.

The Supreme Court was remade by three nominees of former President Donald Trump, who in 2020 became the first sitting president to address the March for Life. The schedule for President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris included no events Friday connected to the march.

Lawmakers from both parties weighed in Friday to note the anniversary of Roe v. Wade and reflect on the shifting political landscape surrounding abortion.

“It has been an eye-opening year for the cause of life in America, and we have made significant progress in defending our youngest and most vulnerable,” said Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the Republican leader in the House.

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Red Cross: Yemen prison airstrike killed, injured over 100

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Red Cross: Yemen prison airstrike killed, injured over 100

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — A Saudi-led airstrike targeting a prison run by Yemen’s Houthi rebels killed and wounded over 100 detainees on Friday, rescuers said, part of a pounding aerial offensive that hours earlier saw another airstrike take the Arab world’s poorest country off the internet.

A strike in the port city of Hodeida, later confirmed by satellite photos analyzed by The Associated Press, hit a telecommunication center there that’s key to Yemen’s connection to the internet. Airstrikes also hit near Sanaa, Yemen’s capital held by the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels since late 2014.

The intense campaign comes after the Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack that struck inside the capital of the United Arab Emirates earlier in the week.

Basheer Omar, an International Committee of the Red Cross spokesperson in Yemen, gave the casualty figure to the AP. He said rescuers continued to go through the prison site in the northern city of Saada, also controlled by the Houthis.

“The toll is likely to increase, unfortunately,” Omar said. The Red Cross had moved some of the wounded to facilities elsewhere, he said. There was no breakdown for how many were killed and how many were wounded.

Doctors Without Borders in a separate statement put the number of wounded alone at “around 200” people.

“From what I hear from my colleague in Saada, there are many bodies still at the scene of the airstrike, many missing people,” said Ahmed Mahat, the organization’s head of mission in Yemen. “It is impossible to know how many people have been killed. It seems to have been a horrific act of violence.”

The organization Save the Children said over 60 were killed in Saada, describing the prison holding detained migrants.

“The initial casualties report from Saada is horrifying,” said Gillian Moyes, Save the Children’s country director in Yemen. “Migrants seeking better lives for themselves and their families, Yemeni civilians injured by the dozens, is a picture we never hoped to wake up to in Yemen.”

The Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis did not immediately acknowledge the strike in Saada.

As for the airstrike in Hodeida that apparently took Yemen entirely offline, NetBlocks said the internet disruption began around 1 a.m. local and affected TeleYemen, the state-owned monopoly that controls internet access in the country. TeleYemen is now run by the Houthis who have held Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, since late 2014.

Yemen faces “a nation-scale collapse of internet connectivity” after an airstrike on a telecommunications building, NetBlocks said.

The San Diego-based Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis and San Francisco-based internet firm CloudFlare also noted a nationwide outage affecting Yemen beginning around the same time.

Over 12 hours later, the internet remained down. The Norwegian Refugee Council decried the strike as “a blatant attack on civilian infrastructure that will also impact our aid delivery.”

The Houthi’s Al-Masirah satellite news channel said the strike on the telecommunications building had killed and wounded people. It released chaotic footage of people digging through rubble for a body as gunshots could be heard. Aid workers assisted bloodied survivors.

Save the Children said the airstrike in Hodeida killed at least three children playing on a soccer field.

Satellite photos analyzed by the AP corresponded to photos shared on social media of the telecommunications building being flattened by the airstrike.

The Saudi-led coalition battling the Houthi rebels acknowledged carrying out “accurate airstrikes to destroy the capabilities of the militia” around Hodeida’s port. It did not immediately acknowledge striking a telecommunication target as NetBlocks described, but instead called Hodeida a hub for piracy and Iranian arms smuggling to back the Houthis. Iran has denied arming the Houthis, though U.N. experts, independent analysts and Western nations point to evidence showing Tehran’s link to the weapons.

The undersea FALCON cable carries internet into Yemen through the Hodeida port along the Red Sea for TeleYemen. The FALCON cable has another landing in Yemen’s far eastern port of Ghaydah as well, but the majority of Yemen’s population lives in its west along the Red Sea.

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