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Aurora teen killed in shooting with former police officer identified

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Police shoot man in Eaton during exchange of gunfire

The teenage boy killed by gunfire during an exchange with a former local police officer has been identified by his family.

Peyton Blitstein, 17, was shot during a Nov. 24 incident outside of an Aurora home.

The Aurora Police Department sent officers to the 4900 block of South Addison Way around 10:30 p.m. the night before Thanksgiving. The area is close to the intersection of South Gun Club Road and East Belleview Avenue.

Police said that the teen was killed following an exchange of gunfire with a 36-year-old man, a former Greenwood Village police officer. The officer was identified by Denver7 as Adam Holen, an officer since 2016 until a recent resignation at the beginning of November.

Holen was also shot but is expected to survive, police said.

In a doorbell camera video obtained by Denver7, the two parties argue over alleged careless driving through the neighborhood before shots were fired

An edited version of that video can be viewed below. The video may be disturbing to some.

A group of teens were going back and forth between parked cars during the confrontation. After shots were fired, Holen appears to briefly leave the scene as two people attempt to aid Blitstein.

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Broncos’ coaching search moves along with Kevin O’Connell, Brian Callahan interviews

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Broncos’ coaching search moves along with Kevin O’Connell, Brian Callahan interviews

Broncos general manager George Paton and team executives checked another time zone off their traveling box Thursday, heading to Los Angeles to interview Rams offensive coordinator Kevin O’Connell after conducting a virtual meeting with Cincinnati offensive coordinator Brian Callahan.

Since Jan. 13, Paton and Co. have flown from Denver to Detroit to Green Bay to Denver to Dallas to Providence, R.I., to Philadelphia to Los Angeles.

Callahan and O’Connell were the eighth and ninth candidates interviewed by the Broncos. Next up is Kansas City offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy on Friday.

Like Green Bay assistants Nathaniel Hackett and Luke Getsy, who were interviewed last week, Callahan and O’Connell are non-play calling coordinators.

Callahan, 37, was up first, two days before Cincinnati plays its first AFC Divisional playoff game in 31 years when it visits top-seeded Tennessee.

A Broncos assistant from 2010-15, Callahan moved on to coach quarterbacks in Detroit (2016-17) and Oakland (2018) before coach Zac Taylor hired him as the Bengals’ offensive coordinator in ’19.

The Bengals have improved from two to 10 wins over three years and from 29th to 13th in scoring this year.

Callahan told reporters this week it has been “really easy,” to keep his attention toward the Titans game.

“My focus is 100% on this game and to our players; there is no other focus for me,” he said. “Anything I do outside of that framework, it’s on my own time late at night (or) early in the morning. These (interviews) are things you slowly prepare for over time and you get a chance to collect your thoughts.

“All of these things are personal accolades and it’s because the team has had success and you get individual benefit from the collective success and that’s certainly where I’m at right now. It’s an honor to be involved in a process like (the Broncos’).”

Callahan is the son of Bill Callahan, previously the head coach of the Raiders (reaching the Super Bowl after the 2002 season) and Nebraska and currently the Cleveland Browns’ offensive line coach.

Before joining the Broncos in 2010, Brian Callahan worked as a graduate assistant at UCLA and two years as a California high school coach. In five years, he had three titles with the Broncos: Coaching assistant (2010), offensive quality control coach (2011-12) and offensive assistant (2013-15). After the February 2016 Super Bowl win, he departed for Detroit to work with offensive coordinator and former Broncos assistant Jim Bob Cooter.

With the Raiders, Callahan coached quarterback Derek Carr, who passed for 4,049 yards, the first of a streak of four consecutive 4,000-yard seasons.

This year for the Bengals, quarterback Joe Burrow finished with 4,611 yards (sixth in the league), 34 touchdowns (eighth) and a 108.3 passer rating (second).

O’Connell, 36, played 40 games at quarterback for San Diego State and was a third-round draft pick by New England (No. 94 overall); in the first round, the Patriots selected Jerod Mayo, who interviewed with the Broncos on Wednesday.

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More cowbell: Protests outside of Michelle Wu’s house continue, but sound a bit different

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More cowbell: Protests outside of Michelle Wu’s house continue, but sound a bit different

The anti-vaccine-mandate protesters outside Mayor Michelle Wu’s house have swapped out bullhorns for cowbells after the cops reportedly made it clear they’d start confiscating noise amplifiers.

On Thursday morning, protesters clanged cowbells and blew whistles as they saw Wu off as she left her house for work.

They ditched their characteristic bullhorns after the police precinct commander told residents in a small community meeting that police would confiscate bullhorns, which locals have complained protesters have used in ways that have woken up kids and elderly relatives early in the morning. The police comments were first reported by Universal Hub following the meeting earlier in the week.

Anti-vaccine-mandate protesters have demonstrated on and off outside of Wu’s house for weeks after the mayor announced a pair of changes that went into effect this past weekend. Now, city workers all need to get vaccinated against COVID-19, and many Boston businesses including restaurants must require proof of vaccination from patrons.

Wu’s complained of the heated rhetoric from the protesters, who have yelled obscenities at her and called her “Hitler” along with more common types of chants like “Shame on Wu.”

The protesters had diverted from Wu’s Roslindale home for a few days to heckle Council President Ed Flynn outside his South Boston residence. They called the Navy vet a “communist” and “traitor” for siding with the mayor.

Protesters have tended toward hitting pols’ houses — with varying degrees of legality — over the past couple of years in the Bay State. Gov. Charlie Baker faced demonstrators from the left and the right, who essentially alternated protesting at his Swampscott home. At one point, a demonstrator protesting the situation at Mass and Cass threw used syringes on the sidewalk. Another man just strolled on into the governor’s house.

In Boston, left-wing protesters advocating for more police cuts in 2020 used heavy-duty glue to paste report cards on the property of all of the city councilors who voted for the mayor’s budget.

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

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New Hampshire detectives pin cold case murder of Massachusetts woman on dead man

Investigators have pinned the New Hampshire murder of a Haverhill woman that had remained unsolved for nearly 50 years on a man who died in 2019.

Arlene Clevesy was 48 years old when her nude body was spotted by a local fisherman near Hume Brook in Newton, N.H., on June 4, 1972, according to a N.H. Attorney General Office report. An autopsy found the cause of death to be “traumatic asphyxia, including drowning.”

Investigators re-opened the case in 2015 and announced Thursday they had determined Albert Francis Moore Jr. was the killer. In 1977, Moore was indicted by a grand jury on a second-degree murder charge in connection with Clevesy’s death. Prosecutors decided not to pursue the case in 1979 because Moore was serving a life sentence for the 1972 killing of Donald Rimer in Salem.

Moore, 88, died on Nov. 11, 2019, of metastatic prostate cancer, the N.H. Cold Case Unit said.

Harold Clevesy, Arlene’s husband, had told police they had gone out for drinks in Haverhill the night before. She had stayed out when he left for home. Witnesses later said that they had seen Arlene Clevesy leave in a truck with Moore.

The attorney general’s office said through the years, Moore “made a series of admissions … about his responsibility for Ms. Clevesy’s death,” including that he had “beaten” a polygraph exam when he was asked questions about her.

Moore also had admitted in other accounts during the 1970s that he had driven Clevesy to a wooded, secluded area, became violent with her, killed her and left her lying face-down in the water, the report said.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.

A 1972 artist sketch of the Arlene Clevesy homicide scene in Newton, N.H. (N.H. Attorney General’s Office)
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