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CU professor will compete in first-ever Professors Tournament on “Jeopardy!”

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CU professor will compete in first-ever Professors Tournament on “Jeopardy!”

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Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders is an assistant professor at CU Boulder and will be featured on “Jeopardy” starting Dec. 6.

A professor of African American history at the University of Colorado in Boulder will, in her own words, partake in the “coolest nerd thing” she’s ever done next week as she makes an appearance on the first-ever Professors Tournament on “Jeopardy!”

Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders is an assistant professor at CU Boulder, where she teaches U.S. and African American history, with a focus on American Civil War memory, Black cultural history, Black radicalism, and collective memory in the United States, according to CU Boulder.

She is one of 15 educators who will compete for a $100,000 grand prize and spot in the show’s upcoming Tournament of Champions.

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NTSB issues report on fatal St. Charles County plane crash

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More details released on St. Charles County plane crash that killed 2

JEFFERSON COUNTY, Mo. — FOX 2 is learning more about the Fox C-6 middle school teacher at the center of a current investigation.

Investigators said the teacher teaches at Ridgewood Middle School and is a 37-year-old woman. The Fox C-6 school district said the teacher has been on administrative leave since Wednesday.

She’s accused of sending multiple inappropriate photos to a student. We spoke to parent Holly Burch, who said she saw a copy of the photos on her son’s phone.

“The pictures I saw, it’s pretty disturbing. Snapchat mainly, as what she was doing it on,” Burch said.

As of Friday, investigators said they are conducting multiple interviews and reviewing evidence. This comes after the Fox C-6 school district released a letter to parents saying the district has received complaints about “inappropriate behavior by a Fox C-6 employee.”

Burch said she and other parents are shocked.

“Just like wow. It’s just shocking. I just don’t understand somebody that age, especially a teacher, that teaches children. That’s your profession to protect them, to teach them,” Burch said. 

The Fox C-6 school district said it is working with investigators. As of right now, the teacher is not facing any charges.

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Official: 1 officer killed, 1 seriously hurt in NYC shooting

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Official: 1 officer killed, 1 seriously hurt in NYC shooting

NEW YORK — A New York Police Department officer was killed and another gravely injured Friday night after responding to a domestic disturbance call, according to a law enforcement official.

A suspect was also killed in the shooting in Harlem, said the official, who was not authorized to speak publicly and did so on condition of anonymity.

The official said a call had come in shortly after 5 p.m. of a mother needing help with her son. Three officers responded to the ground floor apartment on 135th Street.

They spoke to the mother in a front room, and then two officers went to a back room where the son was, and shots rang out, the official said.

Police dispatch audio captured some of the chaotic scene, including an officer screaming for assistance and another officer informing the dispatcher that two officers had been shot. One officer asks for “three buses” or ambulances to the scene and police to block off traffic on the route to nearby Harlem Hospital.

Mayor Eric Adams was at the hospital where the officers were taken after the shooting, the third time in four days that officers have faced gunfire on the job.

An officer was wounded in the leg Tuesday night in the Bronx during a struggle with a teenager who also shot himself. On Thursday, a narcotics detective was shot in the leg on Staten Island.

The last NYPD officer fatally shot in the line of duty, Brian Mulkeen, was hit by friendly fire while struggling with an armed man after chasing and shooting at him in the Bronx in September 2019.

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Thich Nhat Hanh, influential Zen Buddhist monk, dies at 95

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Thich Nhat Hanh, influential Zen Buddhist monk, dies at 95

By HAU DINH, ELAINE KURTENBACH and HRVOJE HRANJSKI, Associated Press

HANOI, Vietnam — Thich Nhat Hanh, the revered Zen Buddhist monk who helped pioneer the concept of mindfulness in the West and socially engaged Buddhism in the East, has died. He was 95.

A post on the monk’s verified Twitter page attributed to The International Plum Village Community of Engaged Buddhism said that Nhat Hanh, known as Thay to his followers, died at Tu Hieu Temple in Hue, Vietnam.

“We invite our beloved global spiritual family to take a few moments to be still, to come back to our mindful breathing, as we together hold Thay in our hearts,” a follow-up post read.

Born as Nguyen Xuan Bao in 1926 and ordained at age 16, Nhat Hanh distilled Buddhist teachings on compassion and suffering into easily grasped guidance over a lifetime dedicated to working for peace. In 1961 he went to the United States to study, teaching comparative religion for a time at Princeton and Columbia universities.

For most of the remainder of his life, he lived in exile at Plum Village, a retreat center he founded in southern France.

There and in talks and retreats around the world, he introduced Zen Buddhism, at its essence, as peace through compassionate listening. Still and steadfast in his brown robes, he exuded an air of watchful, amused calm, sometimes sharing a stage with the somewhat livelier Tibetan Buddhist leader Dalai Lama.

“The peace we seek cannot be our personal possession. We need to find an inner peace which makes it possible for us to become one with those who suffer, and to do something to help our brothers and sisters, which is to say, ourselves,” Nhat Hanh wrote in one of his dozens of books, “The Sun My Heart.”

Surviving a stroke in 2014 that left him unable to speak, he returned to Vietnam in October 2018, spending his final years at the Tu Hieu Pagoda, the monastery where he was ordained nearly 80 years earlier.

Nhat Hanh plunged into anti-war activism after his return to his homeland in 1964 as the Vietnam War was escalating. There, he founded the Order of Inter-being, which espouses “engaged Buddhism” dedicated to nonviolence, mindfulness and social service.

In 1966, he met the U.S. civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in what was a remarkable encounter for both. Nhat Hanh told King he was a “Bodhisattva,” or enlightened being, for his efforts to promote social justice.

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