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Dear Abby: There’s a reason woman isn’t close with her bio mom

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Dear Abby: Social skills are ‘rusty’ after pandemic lockdown

Dear Abby: I have two mothers: my biological mother and Mom, who raised me. I share everything with Mom — my hopes, dreams, fears and everything in between. My biological mother and I are not as close. We never have been. I don’t have a single good childhood memory with her in it.

Lately, my bio mother has been extremely jealous of my relationship with Mom, even though she has never done anything to facilitate the same relationship with me. She’s pushy and constantly oversteps boundaries. Because of this, when I found out I was pregnant, I chose not to tell her.

I’m now 36 weeks pregnant, and someone adjacent to my inner circle has informed her of my pregnancy and due date. She contacted my family FUMING about my not telling her, insisting she had a “right” to know. I feel this is her, once again, feeling entitled to my life and trying to treat me as property. I do not feel she is entitled to any details about my life. Am I wrong?

— Guarded in Illinois

Dear Guarded: You are not wrong, and I can see why you are feeling invaded. You are entitled to privacy if you want it. Your birth mother is “entitled” only to those details of your life you are willing to share with her. (When DID you intend to share the happy news with her? After the birth?) You may need to distance yourself from the person who gave your birth mother the news if you want to avoid similar breaches in the future.

Dear Abby: I’m writing about “Anxious About Alcohol in Georgia,” the teen who was torn between his parents’ views on alcohol as he prepares for his first year of college. In Colorado, Georgia and many other states, minors ARE prohibited from possessing and drinking alcohol — with an important exception. That is, doing it in the presence of and under the supervision of their parents in their home.

I’m not condoning reckless behavior, but when I was growing up, my parents let us try beer and wine at an early age. It was pretty strong, and we didn’t like it. We were never encouraged to get drunk or use it in excess. But we learned about it, tasted it and understood the good and bad when dealing with alcohol. I believe this is why my sisters and I never had issues. We have always been responsible, and I’m convinced this is a responsible way to introduce alcohol to a minor.

We gain knowledge through experience. Having that experience in a safe environment with the proper guidance and supervision is a must. Better to learn with a responsible parent than a frat brother you just met. Agree?

— Allan in Colorado

Dear Allan: Yes, I do. And thank you for pointing out that provision in the law. Many other readers echoed your sentiments about demystifying the allure of alcohol by introducing it in the home under parental supervision. It could prevent some young people from going wild the minute they reach the campus.


Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com.

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Boston Police subdue suspect near Northeastern University

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Boston Police subdue suspect near Northeastern University

A knife-wielding man who took off running down Huntington Avenue reportedly attempting to pull open car doors Monday afternoon was subdued by police.

That suspect is being identified by Boston Police as 39-year-old Carmen Polito of Brockton, who has warrants out for similar felonies in Cambridge. He was arrested at 1:29 p.m. in the Back Bay.

Preliminary charges include two counts of assault by means of a dangerous weapon, a knife, police said. Further charges are possible and he faces arraignment in Boston Municipal Court Tuesday.

Video of the scene by eyewitnesses showed a tense showdown with the suspect running down the street before confronting police — who used a round from a bean bag gun to take the suspect down.

It all came to an end at the intersection of Huntington Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue, near Boston Symphony Orchestra and Northeastern University.

Nobody was seriously hurt, but a police officer was taken to the hospital, according to reports, for minor injuries. The suspect was tumbling on the street and it all unfolded in front on stunned onlookers.

 

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Legislature promises more testing, better masks and vaccination efforts in $55 million coronavirus response bill

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Howie Carr: Massachusetts hacks enjoy end-of-year shakedown bonanza

Lawmakers have promised to “swiftly” pass a $55 million bill for expanded coronavirus testing, youth vaccination education efforts and higher-quality masks for schools and send it to Gov. Charlie Baker’s desk as early as next week.

“Today, … we (are) increasing the availability of rapid testing sites, increasing access to high quality masks for students and teachers and supporting vaccine equity efforts to ensure we can continue to carefully navigate the coming months,” Ways and Means Committee co-chairmen Sen. Michael Rodrigues, D-Westport, and Rep. Aaron Michlewitz, D-Boston, said in a joint statement.

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Rachael Rollins, FBI special agent meet with Massachusetts Jewish community after synagogue hostage crisis, security trainings highlighted

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Rachael Rollins, FBI special agent meet with Massachusetts Jewish community after synagogue hostage crisis, security trainings highlighted

The Texas synagogue hostage crisis hit home for Jewish communities all across the world over the weekend, including for Bay State Jewish people who heard from the FBI and U.S. Attorney on Tuesday in the wake of the horrifying incident.

After the Texas rabbi said security trainings helped him survive the hostage nightmare, many speakers during Tuesday’s community briefing highlighted the importance of trainings for houses of worship.

The rabbi threw a chair at the terrorist, providing cover for other congregants to run out. He was also able to run away and escape.

“It sounds basic but it’s really important, and this is what we do when we conduct training…practice these kinds of drills,” said Jeremy Yamin, director of security and operations for Combined Jewish Philanthropies.

More than 1,400 people registered for the local community briefing on Tuesday.

Joseph Bonavolonta, special agent in charge of the FBI Boston field office, also touted the trainings for protecting houses of worship.

“Please don’t hesitate if you’d be interested in these kinds of threat briefings, not just on protecting houses of worship but also active shooter-related presentations,” he said.

“We’re here,” Bonavolonta added to the attendees. “And there’s no current threat information at all — that we have any knowledge of — that is currently being levied against any houses of worship within the Jewish community, and if we did, you and your community leaders would be the first to know it.”

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